Crash of a Gulfstream 690C Jetprop 840 off Myrtle Beach

Date & Time: Nov 12, 2018 at 1415 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N840JC
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Greater Cumberland - Myrtle Beach
MSN:
690-11676
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The airplane sustained substantial damage when it collided with terrain during an approach to landing at the Myrtle Beach International Airport (MYR), Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. The commercial pilot was seriously injured. The airplane was privately owned and operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Greater Cumberland Regional Airport (CBE), Cumberland, Maryland. According to the pilot, he was following radar vectors for the downwind leg of the traffic pattern to runway 36 at MYR. He turned for final approach and was inside the outer marker, when he encountered heavy turbulence. As he continued the approach, he described what he believed to be a microburst and the airplane started to descend rapidly. The pilot added full power in an attempt to climb, but the airplane continued to descend until it collided with the Atlantic Ocean 1 mile from the approach end of runway 36. A review of pictures of the wreckage provided by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed the cockpit section of the airplane was broken away from the fuselage during the impact sequence. At 1456, the weather recorded at MYR, included broken clouds at 6,000 ft, few clouds at 3,500 ft and wind from 010° at 8 knots. The temperature was 14°C, and the dew point was 9°C. The altimeter setting was 30.27 inches of mercury. The airplane was retained for further examination.

Crash of a Dornier DO328Jet in Manassas

Date & Time: Jun 3, 2006 at 0719 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N328PD
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Manassas - Myrtle Beach
MSN:
3105
YOM:
2000
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
15615
Captain / Total hours on type:
2523.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
819
Copilot / Total hours on type:
141
Aircraft flight hours:
2830
Circumstances:
Prior to departure on the maintenance repositioning flight, the captain discussed with the first officer an uneven fuel balance that they could "fix" once airborne, and a 25,000 feet msl restriction because of an inoperative air conditioning/pressurization pack. The captain also commented about the right pack "misbehaving", and a bleed valve failure warning. The captain also commented about aborting below 80 knots for everything, except for the bleed shutoff valve. During the takeoff roll, a single chime was heard, and the first officer reported a bleed valve fail message. The captain responded, "ignore it." Another chime was heard, and the first officer reported "lateral mode fail, pusher fail." The captain asked about airspeed and was advised of an "indicated airspeed miscompare." The captain initiated the aborted takeoff approximately 13 seconds after the second chime was heard. The crew was unable to stop the airplane, and it went off the end of the runway, and impacted obstructions and terrain. According to the flight data recorder, peak groundspeed was 152 knots and the time the aborted takeoff was initiated, and indicated airspeed was 78.5 knots. The captain and the airplane owner's director of maintenance were aware of several mechanical discrepancies prior to the flight, and the captain had advised the first officer that the flight was for "routine maintenance," but that the airplane was airworthy. Prior to the flight the first officer found "reddish clay" in one of the pitot tubes and removed it. A mechanic and the captain examined the pitot tube, and determined the tube was not obstructed. The captain's pitot tube was later found to be partially blocked with an insect nest. A postaccident examination of the airplane and aircraft maintenance log revealed that no discrepancies were entered in the log, and no placards or "inoperative" decals were affixed in the cockpit.
Probable cause:
The partially blocked pitot system, which resulted in an inaccurate airspeed indicator display, and an overrun during an aborted takeoff. A factor associated with the accident was the pilot-in-command's delayed decision to abort the takeoff.
Final Report:

Crash of a Short 330-200 in Myrtle Beach

Date & Time: May 18, 2006 at 0745 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N937MA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Greensboro – Myrtle Beach
MSN:
3040
YOM:
1980
Flight number:
SNC1340
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Aircraft flight hours:
21095
Circumstances:
Following an uneventful cargo flight from Greensboro, NC, the aircraft made a wheels-up landing on runway 18 at Myrtle Beach Airport, SC. The aircraft slid on its belly for few dozen metres before coming to rest on the main runway. Both pilots escaped uninjured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
NTSB did not conduct any investigation on this event.

Crash of a Piper PA-46-310P Malibu in Hilton Head: 2 killed

Date & Time: Aug 31, 2003 at 1529 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N70DL
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Hilton Head – Myrtle Beach
MSN:
46-8608001
YOM:
1986
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
2536
Captain / Total hours on type:
186.00
Aircraft flight hours:
2676
Circumstances:
The airplane was returning to the airport for landing. A witness reported it was flying erratically streaming a whitish "vapor trail" from the left wing. Another witness reported the airplane banked abruptly into a steep turn to the left, the nose pitched up, and the airplane sank from view behind the trees. The witness then heard a crash and saw smoke. Examination revealed no evidence of flight control, engine, or propeller malfunction. The left inboard fuel cap was absent from the filler port, and a ground search found the left inboard fuel cap in the grass beside the runway. The JetProp LLC, JetProp DLX Supplemental Flight Manual, Section 4, Normal Procedures Checklist, states, "Left Wing 4.9e, ... Inboard Fuel Tank ... CHECK Supply Visually & SECURE CAP ..." Examination of the JetProp LLC, JetProp DLX Supplemental Flight Manual and the Piper Malibu PA-46-310P Information Manual revealed the following instructions on how to secure the fuel caps: "Replace cap securely." There was no evidence of mechanical malfunction with the fuel cap or the filler port.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain control of the airplane during a VFR pattern for a precautionary landing, which resulted in an uncontrolled descent and subsequent collision with terrain. Also causal was the pilot's inadequate preflight inspection of the aircraft, which resulted in his failure to secure the fuel cap.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-31P Pressurized Navajo in Myrtle Beach

Date & Time: Sep 25, 1998
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N684AE
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
31-7400207
YOM:
1974
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
For unknown reasons, the twin engine airplane belly landed at Myrtle Beach and was damaged beyond as a result. The pilot, sole on board, escaped uninjured.

Crash of a Piper PA-61 Aerostar (Ted Smith 601P) in Rock Hill: 2 killed

Date & Time: Aug 20, 1995 at 0028 LT
Registration:
N41GA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Myrtle Beach – Rock Hill
MSN:
61-0465-183
YOM:
1978
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
638
Captain / Total hours on type:
458.00
Aircraft flight hours:
2561
Circumstances:
As the flight approached the airport, radar data showed that it went into a shallow descending left turn away from the airport. Radar data was lost at about 650 feet agl with the ground speed about 100 knots. Witnesses observed the aircraft flying on a southerly heading and enter a spin or spiral from which it crashed nose first into the ground. Post-crash examination of the aircraft structure, flight controls, and engines showed no precrash failure or malfunction. Post-mortem examination of the pilot showed he had suffered a heart attack. The pilot had a history of heart disease, a previous heart attack, and heart bypass surgery. He held a special issuance faa medical certificate, due to his history of heart disease.
Probable cause:
The pilot's in-flight loss of aircraft control, due to incapacitation by a heart attack.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-61P Aerostar (Ted Smith 601P) off Sea Isle City: 4 killed

Date & Time: Aug 14, 1994 at 2303 LT
Registration:
N3642A
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Myrtle Beach – Oxford
MSN:
61-0823-8063432
YOM:
1980
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
1275
Circumstances:
While in cruise flight in a level six thunderstorm over the Atlantic Ocean, the pilot reported the airplane's 'gyro' had failed. The airplane then began a left turn and disappeared off radar. The airplane and its occupants were located on the ocean floor about 48 days after the accident. The airplane had broken apart in-flight. The outboard section of each wing and the tail section were not recovered. The airplane's pneumatic system was destroyed. According to fss records, the pilot had been briefed on the weather along his route of flight.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain aircraft control. Factors contributing to the accident were the presence of a level 6 thunderstorm, loss of gyro's for an undetermined reason, and the pilot's poor weather evaluation.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 401 in Linville: 1 killed

Date & Time: Apr 7, 1980 at 0837 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N9912F
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Myrtle Beach - Cincinnati
MSN:
401-0091
YOM:
1969
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
8919
Captain / Total hours on type:
480.00
Circumstances:
While cruising at an altitude of 5,900 feet in limited visibility due to marginal weather conditions, the twin engine airplane struck the slope of a mountain located near Linville. The aircraft was destroyed and the pilot, sole on board, was killed. At the time of the accident, the visibility was reduced to zero due to low ceiling, rains falls and fog.
Probable cause:
Controlled flight into terrain during normal cruise after the pilot continued VFR flight into adverse weather conditions. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Physical impairment of the pilot,
- Alcoholic impairment of efficiency and judgment,
- Low ceiling,
- Rain,
- Fog,
- Blood ethanol level 90 mg %,
- Hit the mountain at 5,909 feet,
- Mountain obscured.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421A Golden Eagle I in Norfolk

Date & Time: Aug 5, 1979 at 1630 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N3126K
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Myrtle Beach - Farmingdale
MSN:
421A-0107
YOM:
1968
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
8000
Circumstances:
En route from Myrtle Beach to Farmingdale, the pilot encountered engine problems, informed ATC about his situation and was vectored to Norfolk for an emergency landing. The aircraft descended from 8,000 to 3,000 feet when the pilot realized he could not reach Norfolk Airport. He attempted an emergency landing when the aircraft crash landed in an open field. Both occupants were seriously injured and the aircraft was destroyed.
Probable cause:
Engine failure during normal cruise due to piston rings failure. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Material failure,
- Failed to maintain flying speed,
- Improper in-flight decisions,
- Complete engine failure,
- Forced landing off airport on land,
- N° two cylinder piston failed,
- Pilot descended from 8,000 to 3,000 feet 12 miles from field with right engine shut down.
Final Report:

Crash of a Lockheed C-130E Hercules near Myrtle Beach: 12 killed

Date & Time: Dec 5, 1972
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
64-0558
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
4059
YOM:
1965
Crew on board:
12
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
12
Circumstances:
The Hercules was engaged in a local training flight and was supposed, as a target, to be intercepted by the pilot of a USAF Convair F-102A Delta Dagger registered 56-1517. In unclear circumstances, both aircraft collided, dove into the ground and crashed, killing all 13 occupants. It is believed the collision was the consequence of poor judgement and lack of coordination between both crews.