code

VA

Crash of a Cessna 525 CJ1 in Crozet: 1 killed

Date & Time: Apr 15, 2018 at 2100 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N525P
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
MSN:
525-0165
YOM:
1996
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
On April 15, 2018, at 2054 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 525, N525P, was destroyed after it impacted terrain near Crozet, Virginia. The private pilot was fatally injured. The flight was operated by an individual under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Night instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and there was no flight plan filed for the flight, which departed Richmond Executive – Chesterfield County Airport (FCI), Richmond, Virginia, around 2035, and was destined for Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (SHD), Weyers Cave, Virginia. According to preliminary air traffic control data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), a radar target identified as the accident airplane departed FCI, then at 2040 it reached a maximum altitude of about 11,500 ft mean sea level (msl). The airplane began to descend, and at 2044, the airplane leveled off around 4,300 and remained at that altitude until 2053 when it began a descending left turn until radar contact was lost at 2054. According to a witness, he heard the "screaming of the engines" and then felt the terrain shake when the airplane impacted the ground nearby. Furthermore, he stated that the cloud ceiling was "really low," the winds were moderate, and that it was raining heavily at the time of the accident. According to FAA records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, multiengine land, and instrument airplane. In addition, he had a type rating for a CE-525S. The pilot was issued a third-class medical certificate on November 30, 2016. At that time, he reported 1,900 hours total hours of flight experience, of which the 25 hours were within the previous 6 months of the medical examination. According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 1996 and issued an airworthiness certificate in July 2004. In addition, it was equipped with two Williams International FJ44-1A engines, which each produced 1,900 lbs of thrust. The most recent continuous airworthiness inspection was recorded on March 1, 2017, and at that time the airframe had accumulated 3,311.6 total hours of operation.The 2057 recorded weather observation at Charlottesville-Albemarle Airport (CHO), Charlottesville, Virginia, which was about 13 miles to the northeast of the accident location, included wind from 020° at 4 knots, visibility 2 ½ miles, rain and mist, broken clouds at 700 ft above ground level (agl), overcast clouds at 1,500 ft agl, temperature 11° C, dew point 11° C; and an altimeter setting of 29.79 inches of mercury. In the remarks section it indicated that lightning was detected to the northeast and south of the airport. According to Lockheed Martin Flight Services, the pilot had no contact with them or or the direct user access terminal service for the accident flight. The airplane impacted three 40 ft trees about 15 ft prior to impacting terrain at an elevation of 1,520 ft msl. The initial impact crater was about 4 ft deep and an odor similar to Jet A fuel was noted at the accident site. The airplane was highly fragmented and all major components of the airplane were located at the accident site. The debris path fanned out from a 120° heading and the slope of the accident site was noted as a 25° incline. All flight control cables and bell cranks observed remained attached in their appropriate locations through overstress failures. The left engine was impact separated and located in the initial impact crater. The compressor turbine blades were impact-damaged and rotational scoring was noted on the blades. Furthermore, the turbine blade bases exhibited rotational scoring. The right engine was impact separated and located about 60 ft beyond the initial impact location and was partially consumed by fire. The compressor fan blades exhibited rotational scoring and several blades were bent forward. In addition, the compressor turbine blade housing exhibited rotational scoring and the blades were bent the opposite direction of travel. A Garmin 496 handheld GPS was retained and sent to the NTSB Recorders Laboratory for data download.

Crash of a Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain in Richmond

Date & Time: Apr 11, 2011 at 2127 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N3547C
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Richmond - Charlotte
MSN:
31-8052018
YOM:
1980
Flight number:
SKQ601
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
1948
Captain / Total hours on type:
31.00
Aircraft flight hours:
17265
Circumstances:
The twin-engine airplane was scheduled for a routine night cargo flight. Witnesses and radar data described the airplane accelerating down the runway to a maximum ground speed of 97 knots, then entering an aggressive climb before leveling and pitching down. The airplane subsequently impacted a parallel taxiway with its landing gear retracted. Slash marks observed on the taxiway pavement, as well as rotation signatures observed on the remaining propeller blades, indicated that both engines were operating at impact. Additionally, postaccident examination of the wreckage revealed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions of the airframe or either engine. The as-found position of the cargo placed the airplane within the normal weight and balance envelope, with no evidence of a cargo-shift having occurred, and the as-found position of the elevator trim jackscrew was consistent with a neutral pitch trim setting. According to the airframe manufacturer's prescribed takeoff procedure, the pilot was to accelerate the airplane to an airspeed of 85 knots, increase the pitch to a climb angle that would allow the airplane to accelerate past 96 knots, and retract the landing gear before accelerating past 128 knots. Given the loading and environmental conditions that existed on the night of the accident, the airplane's calculated climb performance should have been 1,800 feet per minute. Applying the prevailing wind conditions about time of the accident to the airplane's radar-observed ground speed during the takeoff revealed a maximum estimated airspeed of 111 knots, and the airplane's maximum calculated climb rate briefly exceeded 3,000 feet per minute. The airplane then leveled for a brief time, decelerated, and began descending, a profile that suggested that the airplane likely entered an aerodynamic stall during the initial climb.
Probable cause:
The pilot’s failure to maintain adequate airspeed during the initial climb, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall and subsequent impact with the ground.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 303 Crusader in Louisa: 1 killed

Date & Time: Mar 4, 2010 at 1245 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N9305T
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Manassas - Louisa - Danville
MSN:
303-00001
YOM:
1981
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
2255
Aircraft flight hours:
1374
Circumstances:
During takeoff, one witness noted that at least one engine seemed to be running rough and not making power. Several other witnesses, located about 1/2 mile northwest of the airport, observed the accident airplane pass overhead in a right turn. They reported that the engine noise did not sound normal. Two of the witnesses noted grayish black smoke emanating from the airplane. The airplane then rolled left and descended nose down into the front yard of a residence. Review of maintenance records revealed the airplane underwent an annual inspection and extensive maintenance about 3 months prior to the accident. One of the maintenance issues was to troubleshoot the right engine that was reportedly running rough at cruise. During the maintenance, the right engine fuel pump, metering valve, and fuel manifold were removed and replaced with overhauled units. Additionally, the right engine fuel flow was reset contrary to procedures contained in an engine manufacturer service information directive; however, the fuel pump could not be tested due to thermal damage and the investigation could not determine if the fuel flow setting procedure contributed to the loss of power on the right engine. On-scene examination of the wreckage and teardown examination of both engines did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions. Teardown examination of the right propeller revealed that the blades were not at or near the feather position, which was contrary to the emergency procedure published by the manufacturer, to secure the engine and feather the propeller in the event of an engine power loss. The right propeller exhibited signatures consistent with low or no power at impact, while the left propeller exhibited signatures consistent of being operated with power at impact.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain aircraft control and secure the right engine during a loss of engine power after takeoff. Contributing to the accident was the loss of engine power on the right engine for undetermined reasons.
Final Report:

Crash of a Pilatus PC-12 in Lynchburg: 4 killed

Date & Time: Jul 5, 2009 at 1002 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N578DC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Teterboro-Tampa
MSN:
0570
YOM:
2004
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
1873
Captain / Total hours on type:
715.00
Aircraft flight hours:
723
Circumstances:
While in instrument meteorological conditions flying 800 feet above the airplane’s service ceiling (30,000 feet), with no icing conditions reported, the pilot reported to the air traffic controller that he, “...lost [his] panel.” With the autopilot most likely engaged, the airplane began a right roll about 36 seconds later. The airplane continued in a right roll that increased to 105 degrees, then rolled back to about 70 degrees, before the airplane entered a right descending turn. The airplane continued its descending turn until being lost from radar in the vicinity of the accident site. The airplane impacted in a nose-down attitude in an open field and was significantly fragmented. Postaccident inspection of the flight control system, engine, and propeller revealed no evidence of preimpact failure or malfunction. The flaps and landing gear were retracted and all trim settings were within the normal operating range. Additionally, the airplane was within weight and balance limitations for the flight. The cause of the pilot-reported panel failure could not be determined; however, the possibility of a total electrical failure was eliminated since the pilot maintained radio contact with the air traffic controller. Although the source of the instrumentation failure could not be determined, proper pilot corrective actions, identified in the pilot operating handbook, following the failure most likely would have restored flight information to the pilot’s electronic flight display. Additionally, a standby attitude gyro, compass, and the co-pilot’s electronic flight display units would be available for attitude reference information assuming they were operational.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain control of the airplane while in instrument meteorological conditions following a reported instrumentation failure for undetermined reasons.

Crash of a Raytheon 390 Premier I in Leesburg

Date & Time: Feb 12, 2008 at 2055 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N16DK
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Wichita-Leesburg
MSN:
RB-019
YOM:
2001
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
6000
Aircraft flight hours:
1584
Circumstances:

On landing, the aircraft encountered problem at midfield to decelerate normally. The airplane eventually left the runway and lost its left undercarriage. The aircraft was declared damaged beyond repair. Both occupant escaped uninjured.

Crash of a Dornier DO328Jet in Manassas

Date & Time: Jun 3, 2006 at 0719 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N328PD
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Manassas-Myrtle Beach
MSN:
3105
YOM:
2000
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
15615
Captain / Total hours on type:
2523.00
Aircraft flight hours:
2830
Circumstances:
Prior to departure on the maintenance repositioning flight, the captain discussed with the first officer an uneven fuel balance that they could "fix" once airborne, and a 25,000 feet msl restriction because of an inoperative air conditioning/pressurization pack. The captain also commented about the right pack "misbehaving", and a bleed valve failure warning. The captain also commented about aborting below 80 knots for everything, except for the bleed shutoff valve. During the takeoff roll, a single chime was heard, and the first officer reported a bleed valve fail message. The captain responded, "ignore it." Another chime was heard, and the first officer reported "lateral mode fail, pusher fail." The captain asked about airspeed and was advised of an "indicated airspeed miscompare." The captain initiated the aborted takeoff approximately 13 seconds after the second chime was heard. The crew was unable to stop the airplane, and it went off the end of the runway, and impacted obstructions and terrain. According to the flight data recorder, peak groundspeed was 152 knots and the time the aborted takeoff was initiated, and indicated airspeed was 78.5 knots. The captain and the airplane owner's director of maintenance were aware of several mechanical discrepancies prior to the flight, and the captain had advised the first officer that the flight was for "routine maintenance," but that the airplane was airworthy. Prior to the flight the first officer found "reddish clay" in one of the pitot tubes and removed it. A mechanic and the captain examined the pitot tube, and determined the tube was not obstructed. The captain's pitot tube was later found to be partially blocked with an insect nest. A postaccident examination of the airplane and aircraft maintenance log revealed that no discrepancies were entered in the log, and no placards or "inoperative" decals were affixed in the cockpit
Probable cause:
The partially blocked pitot system, which resulted in an inaccurate airspeed indicator display, and an overrun during an aborted takeoff. A factor associated with the accident was the pilot-in-command's delayed decision to abort the takeoff.

Crash of a Cessna 414 Chancellor in Petersburg

Date & Time: Dec 2, 2004 at 1310 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N2EQ
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Petersburg-Petersburg
MSN:
414-0373
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3000
Captain / Total hours on type:
130.00
Circumstances:

With 2 technicians and 2 pilots on board, the twin engine aircraft was performing a test flight before its delivery to a new owner. On final approach to runway 05, the aircraft suddenly yawed to the right and crashed to the right of the runway before coming to rest on a parking lot and colliding with a Cessna 172. Both aircraft were destroyed but nobody was injured.

Crash of a Beechcraft Super King Air 200 in Martinsville: 10 killed

Date & Time: Oct 24, 2004 at 1235 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N501RH
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Concord-Martinsville
MSN:
BB-0805
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
10
Captain / Total flying hours:
10733
Captain / Total hours on type:
210.00
Aircraft flight hours:
8078
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft was flying from Concord to Martinsville-Blue Ridge airport. On final approach to runway 30, the crew made a missed approach and the aircraft crashed shortly later on the side of Bull mountain. Nobody survived. Crew negliged approach procedures.

Crash of a Socata TBM-700 in Leesburg: 3 killed

Date & Time: Mar 1, 2003 at 1445 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N700PP
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Greenville-Leesburg
MSN:
059
YOM:
1992
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
8375
Copilot / Total flying hours:
730
Aircraft flight hours:
1049
Circumstances:

On final approach to runway 17, the aircraft struck tree tops and crashed three km short of runway. Some witnesses told NTSB that the aircraft suddenly doved to the ground after passing the last clouds.

Crash of a Bae Jetstream 41 in Charlottesville

Date & Time: Dec 29, 2000 at 2234 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N323UE
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Washington D.C.-Charlottesville
MSN:
41059
YOM:
1995
Flight number:
UA331
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
15
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
4050
Captain / Total hours on type:
1425.00
Aircraft flight hours:
14456