Crash of a Short 330-200 in Charleston: 2 killed

Date & Time: May 5, 2017 at 0653 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N334AC
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Louisville – Charleston
MSN:
SH3029
YOM:
31
Flight number:
2Q1260
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The crew departed Louisville, Kentucky, at 0541LT on a cargo flight to Charleston on behalf of UPS. Upon landing on runway 05, the left wing touched the runway surface 340 feet past the runway threshold, veered off runway to the left 300 feet farther and came to rest in a wooded area located 100 feet below the runway. The main fuselage, tail and right wing are all together about 100 feet down the slope from the runway in a hollow of trees. The front part of the aircraft is pointing down the hill toward Barlow Drive. It’s laying on its left side with the right wing folded over the top. The aircraft was destroyed and both crew members were killed. It was reported that the aircraft was not equipped with CVR & FDR recording systems.

Crash of a Short C-23 Sherpa in Dodoma

Date & Time: Jun 1, 2007
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
JW9036
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Sumbawanga – Dodoma
MSN:
3121
YOM:
1986
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
9
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On approach to Dodoma Airport, both engines failed simultaneously. The captain attempted an emergency landing in a cornfield located near the Kizota district. Upon landing, the aircraft lost its nose gear and slid for few dozen metres before coming to rest. All 13 occupants escaped with minor injuries and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Short 330-200 in Myrtle Beach

Date & Time: May 18, 2006 at 0745 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N937MA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Greensboro – Myrtle Beach
MSN:
3040
YOM:
1980
Flight number:
SNC1340
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Aircraft flight hours:
21095
Circumstances:
Following an uneventful cargo flight from Greensboro, NC, the aircraft made a wheels-up landing on runway 18 at Myrtle Beach Airport, SC. The aircraft slid on its belly for few dozen metres before coming to rest on the main runway. Both pilots escaped uninjured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
NTSB did not conduct any investigation on this event.

Crash of a Short 330-200 in DuBois

Date & Time: Apr 9, 2003 at 0715 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N805SW
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Pittsburgh – DuBois
MSN:
3055
YOM:
1980
Flight number:
SKZ1170
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3470
Captain / Total hours on type:
2100.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1347
Copilot / Total hours on type:
431
Aircraft flight hours:
24401
Circumstances:
The airplane was on an instrument landing system (ILS) approach in instrument meteorological conditions. The captain initially stated that the airplane was on the ILS approach with the engine power set at flight idle. About 300 feet above the ground, and 1/4 to 1/2 mile from the threshold, the captain made visual contact with the runway. The captain stated that the left engine then surged, which caused the airplane to yaw right and drift left. At the time, the airplane was in visual conditions, and on glideslope, with the airspeed decreasing through 106 knots. The captain aligned the airplane with the runway and attempted to go-around, but the throttles were difficult to move. The airplane began to stall and the captain lowered the nose. The airplane subsequently struck terrain about 500 feet prior to the runway. After the captain was informed that the engine power should not be at flight idle during the approach, he amended his statement to include the approach power setting at 1,000 lbs. of torque. The co-pilot initially reported that the engine anomaly occurred while at flight idle. However, the co-pilot later amended his statement and reported that the anomaly occurred as power was being reduced toward flight idle, but not at flight idle. Examination of the left engine did not reveal any pre-impact mechanical malfunctions. Examination of the airplane cockpit did not reveal any anomalies with the throttle levers. Review of a flight manual for the make and model accident airplane revealed that during a normal landing, 1,100 lbs of torque should be set prior to turning base leg. The manual further stated to reduce the power levers about 30 feet agl, and initiate a gentle flare. The reported weather at the airport about 5 minutes before the accident included a visibility 3/4 mile in mist, and an overcast ceiling at 100 feet. The reported weather at the airport about 7 minutes after the accident included visibility 1/4 mile in freezing fog and an overcast ceiling at 100 feet. Review of the terminal procedure for the respective ILS approach revealed that the decision height was 200 feet agl, and the required minimum visibility was 1/2 mile.
Probable cause:
The captain's failure to maintain the proper glidepath during the instrument approach, and his failure to perform a go-around. Factors were a low ceiling and reduced visibility due to mist.
Final Report:

Crash of a Short C-23B Sherpa in Unadilla: 21 killed

Date & Time: Mar 3, 2001 at 0955 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
93-1336
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Hurlburt Field - Oceana
MSN:
3420
YOM:
1985
Flight number:
PAT528
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
18
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
21
Circumstances:
The Sherpa departed Hurlburt Field AFB, Florida, on flight PAT528 to Oceana NAS, Virginia, carrying 18 passengers and a crew of three. While in cruising altitude over Georgia, the crew encountered poor weather conditions with thunderstorm activity, heavy rain falls, severe turbulences, windshear conditions and wind gusting up to 72 knots. The aircraft became unstable, lost 100 feet in three seconds then adopted a nose up attitude. Within the next 12 seconds, the aircraft suffered a positive aerodynamic acceleration then entered an uncontrolled descent, partially disintegrated in the air and eventually crashed in an open field. All 21 occupants were killed.
Crew (171st Aviation Regiment Lakeland):
CW4 Johnny W. Duce,
CW2 Erik P. Larson,
S/Sgt Robert F. Ward Jr.
Passengers (213rd Red Horse Flight, Virginia Beach):
M/Sgt James Beninati,
S/Sgt Paul J. Blancato,
T/Sgt Ernest Blawas,
S/Sgt Andrew H. Bridges,
M/Sgt Eric G. Bulman,
S/Sgt Paul E. Cramer,
T/Sgt Michael E. East,
S/Sgt Ronald L. Elkin,
S/Sgt James P. Ferguson,
S/Sgt Randy V. Johnson,
SRA Mathrew K. Kidd,
M/Sgt Michael E. Lane,
T/Sgt Edwin B. Richardson,
T/Sgt Dean J. Shelby,
S/Sgt John L. Sincavage,
S/Sgt Gregory T. Skurupey,
S/Sgt Richard L. Summerell,
Maj Frederick V. Watkins III.
Probable cause:
The Collateral Investigation Board found the preponderance of the evidence concluded that the aircraft accident was due to crew error. The board found other factors present but not contributing directly to this aircraft accident. These factors may have influenced the crew's decision making process and aircraft performance. This is normally the case in most aircraft human factor accidents. The board did find the preponderance of the evidence directed the board toward the crew's failure to properly load the aircraft. In particular, the crew's failure to properly manage the weight and balance of the aircraft resulted in an 'out-of-CG' condition that exceeded the aircraft design limits, rendering the aircraft unstable and leading to a violent departure from controlled flight. Once the aircraft departed controlled flight, the rapid onset of significant G-force shifts rendered the crew and passengers incapacitated and unconscious and led to a structural break-up of the aircraft in flight. This ultimately resulted in the aircraft impacting the ground, killing all on board.