Crash of an IAI-1124 Westwind in Moss Town

Date & Time: May 24, 2006 at 0055 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N475AT
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
San Juan – Norfolk
MSN:
270
YOM:
1979
Location:
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
At 0444Z On May 24 2006, Miami Centre (George Town Sector) informed Nassau ATC That Lifeguard Flight N475AT, a Westwind Jet (WW-1124), en-route from San Juan, Puerto Rico to Norfolk, Virginia reported that it had developed generator problems and the aircraft was looking to land at the nearest airport to its position. Miami Air Traffic Center vectored the aircraft to Exuma International Airport at Great Exuma, Bahamas, as that was the nearest airport. Attempts were made by Nassau ATC to contact the authorities at Exuma International Airport to have the runway lights turned on. At 0454Z, Miami ATC reported loss of contact with the aircraft; therefore, N475AT proceeded with an emergency landing, before Miami ATC could give further instructions. The uncontrolled aircraft came to rest approximately 800 feet beyond the end of runway 30 and approximately 300 feet right of the extended centre line of the runway. The aircraft landing gears were sheered off when the aircraft exited the runway, hence traveling into the clearing and then eventually into the bushes on the right side of the runway. The right wing of the aircraft collided with a mound of dirt, causing it to spin uncontrollably, resulting in it coming to rest on an easterly heading at an approximate 30 degree incline. The occupants were evacuated from the wreckage and received minor injuries while making their way thru the thick brush and shrubbery while being led to safety. All Crew members were ATP rated and both proficiency checks found to be were valid and current neither of the pilots was available for an interview at the time of the field investigation at Exuma International Airport.
Probable cause:
Findings and Probable Cause could not be determined as the aircraft was stripped of its components, instrumentations, manuals and CVR by the owners of the aircraft, without permission or authorization from the Accident Investigation Personnel (Department of Civil Aviation). Documents and manuals requested of the owners were never obtained. The help of the NTSB as well as the FAA were enlisted in an effort to retrieve documents from the owners. All attempts were fruitless.
Final Report:

Crash of a Douglas DC-8-61F at Guantánamo Bay NAS

Date & Time: Aug 18, 1993 at 1656 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N814CK
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Norfolk – Guantánamo Bay
MSN:
46127
YOM:
1969
Flight number:
CB808
Country:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
20727
Captain / Total hours on type:
1527.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
15350
Copilot / Total hours on type:
492
Aircraft flight hours:
43947
Aircraft flight cycles:
18829
Circumstances:
Flight 808 took off from Norfolk at 14:13 for a cargo flight to Guantánamo Bay. The flight and arrival into the Guantánamo terminal area was uneventful. At 16:34, while the flight was descending from FL320, radio contact was established with the Guantánamo radar controller. The radar controller instructed flight 808 to maintain VFR 12 miles off the Cuban coast and report at East Point. The runway in use was runway 10. The flight crew then requested a runway 28 approach, but changed this back to a runway 10 approach a couple of minutes later. Clearance was given at 16:46 with wind reported at 200°/7 knots. The runway 10 threshold was located 0,75 mile East of Cuban airspace, designated by a strobe light, mounted on a Marine Corps guard tower, located at the corner of the Cuban border and the shoreline. On the day of the accident, the strobe light was not operational (both controller and flight crew were not aware of this). The aircraft was approached from the south and was making a right turn for runway 10 with an increasing angle of bank in order to align with the runway. At 200-300 feet agl the wings started to rock towards wings level and the nose pitched up. The right wing appeared to stall, the aircraft rolled to 90deg. angle of bank and the nose pitched down. The aircraft then struck level terrain 1400 feet west of the approach end of the runway and 200 feet north of the extended centreline.
Probable cause:
The impaired judgement, decision-making, and flying abilities of the captain and flight crew due to the effects of fatigue; the captain's failure to properly assess the conditions for landing and maintaining vigilant situational awareness of the airplane while manoeuvring onto final approach; his failure to prevent the loss of airspeed and avoid a stall while in the steep bank turn; and his failure to execute immediate action to recover from a stall. Additional factors contributing to the cause were the inadequacy of the flight and duty time regulations applied to 14 CFR, Part 121, Supplemental Air Carrier, international operations, and the circumstances that resulted in the extended flight/duty hours and fatigue of the flight crew members. Also contributing were the inadequate crew resource management training and the inadequate training and guidance by American International Airways, Inc., to the flight crew for operations at special airports such as Guantanamo Bay; and the Navy's failure to provide a system that would assure that local tower controller was aware of the inoperative strobe light so as to provide the flight crew with such information.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-31-310 Navajo in Norfolk: 5 killed

Date & Time: Apr 14, 1986 at 1013 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N6700L
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Norfolk - Omaha
MSN:
31-105
YOM:
1968
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
5980
Circumstances:
The airplane departed on runway 31 with a low ceiling and visibility variable from 1/4 mile to 1/16 mile and winds from 290° at 38 knots, gusting to 47 knots. A witness stated that the airplane was airborne no more than two minutes after the engines were started. The airplane was heard and observed 1/4 of a mile northeast of the airport at low altitude. It climbed into the clouds and impacted the terrain in an almost flat attitude, 1/8 of a mile beyond and was demolished by impact and post-impact fire. All five occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: loss of control - in flight
Phase of operation: takeoff - initial climb
Findings
1. (f) weather condition - low ceiling
2. (f) weather condition - obscuration
3. (f) weather condition - snow
4. (c) preflight planning/preparation - inadequate - pilot in command
5. (f) stall - inadvertent - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #2: in flight collision with terrain/water
Phase of operation: descent - uncontrolled
----------
Occurrence #3: fire
Phase of operation: other
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-31-300 Navajo in Appomattox

Date & Time: Feb 29, 1980 at 1030 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N77QC
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Norfolk - Roanoke
MSN:
31-511
YOM:
1969
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3330
Captain / Total hours on type:
1027.00
Circumstances:
While in cruising altitude on a taxi flight from Norfolk to Roanoke, the pilot informed ATC about a double engine failure and elected to divert to the nearest airport. Shortly later, he decided to attempt an emergency landing when the airplane crashed in an open field. Both occupants were slightly injured and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
Douglas engine failure in flight due to inadequate preflight preparation on part of the pilot. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Mismanagement of fuel,
- Fuel exhaustion,
- Powerplant-instruments: fuel quantity gauge, improperly alignment/adjustment,
- Forces landing off airport on land,
- Fuel gauges read 1/8 full, tanks empty.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421A Golden Eagle I in Norfolk

Date & Time: Aug 5, 1979 at 1630 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N3126K
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Myrtle Beach - Farmingdale
MSN:
421A-0107
YOM:
1968
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
8000
Circumstances:
En route from Myrtle Beach to Farmingdale, the pilot encountered engine problems, informed ATC about his situation and was vectored to Norfolk for an emergency landing. The aircraft descended from 8,000 to 3,000 feet when the pilot realized he could not reach Norfolk Airport. He attempted an emergency landing when the aircraft crash landed in an open field. Both occupants were seriously injured and the aircraft was destroyed.
Probable cause:
Engine failure during normal cruise due to piston rings failure. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Material failure,
- Failed to maintain flying speed,
- Improper in-flight decisions,
- Complete engine failure,
- Forced landing off airport on land,
- N° two cylinder piston failed,
- Pilot descended from 8,000 to 3,000 feet 12 miles from field with right engine shut down.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft C18S off West Falmouth

Date & Time: Jul 30, 1973 at 1100 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N44565
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Norfolk - Norfolk
MSN:
6859
YOM:
1944
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2700
Captain / Total hours on type:
280.00
Circumstances:
The pilot, sole on board, departed Norfolk in the morning on a local pleasure flight. While flying over the ocean, he elected to transfer fuel from the right tank to the left tank when both engines failed simultaneously. Unable to restart them, he attempt to ditch the aircraft few miles off West Falmouth. The aircraft sank and was lost while the pilot was uninjured.
Probable cause:
Double engine failure in flight caused by a mismanagement of fuel. The following factors were reported:
- Inattentive to fuel supply,
- Fuel starvation,
- Pilot exhausted fuel from right tank, unable to restart on left tank.
Final Report:

Crash of a Mitsubishi MU-2B-20 Marquise in Salisbury

Date & Time: Jan 16, 1970 at 0115 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N764Q
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Miami – Norfolk – Philadelphia
MSN:
141
YOM:
1969
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
9100
Captain / Total hours on type:
137.00
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft was completing a flight from Miami to Philadelphia with an intermediate stop in Norfolk, Virginia. On the second leg, the pilot encountered fuel problems and was forced to divert to Salisbury Regional Airport for an emergency landing. On final, both engines stopped simultaneously and the airplane stalled, struck trees and crashed in a wooded area. All five occupants were injured, two of them seriously. The aircraft was destroyed.
Probable cause:
Double engine failure caused by a fuel starvation. The following factors were considered as contributing:
- Mismanagement of fuel on part of the pilot,
- Miscalculation of fuel consumption on part of the pilot,
- Fuel starvation,
- Double engine failure,
- Fuel in tip tanks only as the others were empty,
- Undetermined amount of fuel lost due to broken O ring seal,
- Fuel level control valve.
Final Report:

Crash of a Douglas DC-7BF in Philadelphia

Date & Time: Jul 2, 1968 at 1811 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N762Z
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Norfolk – Philadelphia
MSN:
44922
YOM:
1956
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
19616
Captain / Total hours on type:
7095.00
Circumstances:
The crew was completing a cargo flight from Norfolk to Philadelphia on behalf of the US Air Force. After touchdown on wet runway 09/27 at Philadelphia-Intl Airport, the crew encountered difficulties to decelerate properly. The four engine aircraft suffered hydroplaning then went out of control and veered off runway to the right. While contacting soft ground, the undercarriage collapsed and the right wing was torn off. The airplane came to rest in flames and was destroyed by a post crash fire while all three crew members escaped uninjured.
Probable cause:
The accident was the consequence of the following factors:
- The crew failed to maintain directional control,
- Improper operation of powerplant,
- Asymmetrical thrust reversal,
- Wet runway,
- Hydroplaning,
- Overload failure,
- Asymmetrical power applied during reversing phase of landing due to n° 1 prop circuit breaker deactivated.
Final Report:

Crash of a Vickers 745D Viscount in Norfolk

Date & Time: Jan 19, 1967 at 1359 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N7431
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
129
YOM:
1956
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
46
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
14048
Captain / Total hours on type:
352.00
Circumstances:
Following a normal touchdown at Norfolk Municipal Airport, the crew started the braking procedure when the airplane collided with a snow plow. A wing was torn off and the snowplow was dragged over several meters. There were no injuries but the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
It was determined that the snowplows driver went onto runway without clearance after he misinterpreted ATC instructions.
Final Report:

Crash of a Vickers 745D Viscount in Holdcroft: 50 killed

Date & Time: Jan 18, 1960 at 2219 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N7462
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Chicago – Washington DC – Norfolk
MSN:
217
YOM:
1957
Flight number:
CA020
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
44
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
50
Captain / Total flying hours:
20850
Captain / Total hours on type:
3560.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
5215
Copilot / Total hours on type:
2952
Aircraft flight hours:
9247
Circumstances:
While cruising at an altitude of 8,000 feet in foggy and icing conditions, both engines number three and four failed. The crew elected to restart the engines, without success. The airplane went out of control and plunged before crashing in a wooded area, striking the ground in a level attitude, with no forward velocity. The airplane was destroyed and all 50 occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
The Board determines the probable cause of this accident was the delayed arming of the engine ice-protection systems while flying in icy conditions, resulting in the loss of engine power and attendant electrical energy required to unfeather propellers and relight sufficient engines to maintain flight.
Final Report: