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Crash of a Cessna 303 Crusader in Louisa: 1 killed

Date & Time: Mar 4, 2010 at 1245 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N9305T
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Manassas - Louisa - Danville
MSN:
303-00001
YOM:
1981
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
2255
Aircraft flight hours:
1374
Circumstances:
During takeoff, one witness noted that at least one engine seemed to be running rough and not making power. Several other witnesses, located about 1/2 mile northwest of the airport, observed the accident airplane pass overhead in a right turn. They reported that the engine noise did not sound normal. Two of the witnesses noted grayish black smoke emanating from the airplane. The airplane then rolled left and descended nose down into the front yard of a residence. Review of maintenance records revealed the airplane underwent an annual inspection and extensive maintenance about 3 months prior to the accident. One of the maintenance issues was to troubleshoot the right engine that was reportedly running rough at cruise. During the maintenance, the right engine fuel pump, metering valve, and fuel manifold were removed and replaced with overhauled units. Additionally, the right engine fuel flow was reset contrary to procedures contained in an engine manufacturer service information directive; however, the fuel pump could not be tested due to thermal damage and the investigation could not determine if the fuel flow setting procedure contributed to the loss of power on the right engine. On-scene examination of the wreckage and teardown examination of both engines did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions. Teardown examination of the right propeller revealed that the blades were not at or near the feather position, which was contrary to the emergency procedure published by the manufacturer, to secure the engine and feather the propeller in the event of an engine power loss. The right propeller exhibited signatures consistent with low or no power at impact, while the left propeller exhibited signatures consistent of being operated with power at impact.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain aircraft control and secure the right engine during a loss of engine power after takeoff. Contributing to the accident was the loss of engine power on the right engine for undetermined reasons.
Final Report:

Crash of a Dornier DO328Jet in Manassas

Date & Time: Jun 3, 2006 at 0719 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N328PD
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Manassas - Myrtle Beach
MSN:
3105
YOM:
2000
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
15615
Captain / Total hours on type:
2523.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
819
Copilot / Total hours on type:
141
Aircraft flight hours:
2830
Circumstances:
Prior to departure on the maintenance repositioning flight, the captain discussed with the first officer an uneven fuel balance that they could "fix" once airborne, and a 25,000 feet msl restriction because of an inoperative air conditioning/pressurization pack. The captain also commented about the right pack "misbehaving", and a bleed valve failure warning. The captain also commented about aborting below 80 knots for everything, except for the bleed shutoff valve. During the takeoff roll, a single chime was heard, and the first officer reported a bleed valve fail message. The captain responded, "ignore it." Another chime was heard, and the first officer reported "lateral mode fail, pusher fail." The captain asked about airspeed and was advised of an "indicated airspeed miscompare." The captain initiated the aborted takeoff approximately 13 seconds after the second chime was heard. The crew was unable to stop the airplane, and it went off the end of the runway, and impacted obstructions and terrain. According to the flight data recorder, peak groundspeed was 152 knots and the time the aborted takeoff was initiated, and indicated airspeed was 78.5 knots. The captain and the airplane owner's director of maintenance were aware of several mechanical discrepancies prior to the flight, and the captain had advised the first officer that the flight was for "routine maintenance," but that the airplane was airworthy. Prior to the flight the first officer found "reddish clay" in one of the pitot tubes and removed it. A mechanic and the captain examined the pitot tube, and determined the tube was not obstructed. The captain's pitot tube was later found to be partially blocked with an insect nest. A postaccident examination of the airplane and aircraft maintenance log revealed that no discrepancies were entered in the log, and no placards or "inoperative" decals were affixed in the cockpit.
Probable cause:
The partially blocked pitot system, which resulted in an inaccurate airspeed indicator display, and an overrun during an aborted takeoff. A factor associated with the accident was the pilot-in-command's delayed decision to abort the takeoff.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft A60 Duke in Manassas: 5 killed

Date & Time: Mar 11, 1989 at 1615 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N98DS
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Manassas – Wilmington
MSN:
P-227
YOM:
1973
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
25130
Aircraft flight hours:
1775
Circumstances:
Witnesses reported the aircraft took off and climbed to about 300 feet while in a wide left turn. According to witnesses, the wings were rocking and erratic engine sounds were noted. The aircraft was turning downwind when it abruptly pitched down, rolled left until inverted, descended and crash. Examination of the aircraft revealed no evidence of malfunction, although the left prop had less rotational damage than the right prop. Examination of aircraft records revealed the aircraft was inactive for about 9 years until it was returned to service less than a year before the accident. The aircraft accumulated about 17 hours since it was returned to service. The pilot stated to a witness before the accident that he had not done single engine operation in the aircraft. The aircraft was overloaded more than 200 lbs. All five occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
A loss of aircraft control due to the pilot's failure to maintain minimum engine control speed after a partial loss of power of the left engine for undetermined reasons. The pilot's inexperience in type of aircraft and an over maximum gross weight aircraft were contributing factors.
Final Report: