Zone

Crash of a Dassault Falcon 20D in San Luis Potosí

Date & Time: Aug 7, 2018 at 0110 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N961AA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Santiago de Querétaro - Laredo
MSN:
205
YOM:
1969
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The aircraft departed Santiago de Querétaro Airport on a night cargo flight to Laredo, Texas, carrying two pilots and a load consisting of automotive parts. En route, the crew encountered engine problems and was clearted to divert to San Luis Potosí-Ponciano Arriaga Airport for an emergency landing. On approach, the crew realized he could not make it and decided to attempt an forced landing. The airplane struck the ground, lost its undercarriage and came to rest in an agricultural area located in Peñasco, about 6 km northeast of runway 14 threshold. The left wing was bent and partially torn off. Both crew members escaped with minor injuries and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Piper PA-31P Pressurized Navajo in Laredo: 2 killed

Date & Time: Mar 8, 2018 at 1038 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N82605
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Laredo - Laredo
MSN:
31P-7730010
YOM:
1977
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
4243
Copilot / Total flying hours:
194
Aircraft flight hours:
3185
Circumstances:
The commercial pilot and passenger, who held a student certificate, departed runway 18R for a local flight in a multi-engine airplane. The pilot held a flight instructor certificate for single-engine airplane. Just after takeoff, the tower controller reported to the pilot that smoke was coming from the left side of the airplane. The pilot acknowledged, stating that they were going to "fix it," and then entered a left downwind for runway 18R, adding that they didn't need any assistance. The controller subsequently cleared the airplane to land on runway 18L, which the pilot acknowledged. Two witnesses reported seeing the smoke come from the left engine. Still images taken from airport security video show the airplane before making the turn to land with white smoke trailing and the landing gear down. The airplane was then seen in a steep left turn to final approach exceeding 90° of bank, before it impacted terrain, just short of the runway in a near vertical attitude. A postcrash fire ensued. The examination of the wreckage found that the left engine's propeller was not being driven by the engine at the time of impact. The left propeller was not in the feathered position and the landing gear was found extended. The damage to the right engine propeller blades was consistent with the engine operating at high power at impact. The examination of the airframe and engines revealed no evidence of preimpact anomalies; however, the examinations were limited by impact and fire damage which precluded examination of the hoses and lines associated with the engines. The white smoke observed from the left side of the airplane was likely the result of an oil leak which allowed oil to reach the hot exterior surfaces of the engine; however, this could not be verified due to damage to the engine. There was no evidence of oil starvation for either engine. Both the extended landing gear and non-feathered left propeller would have increased the drag on the airplane. Because the pilot's operating procedures for an engine failure in a climb call for feathering the affected engine and raising the landing gear until certain of making the field, it is unlikely the pilot followed the applicable checklists in response to the situation. Further, the change from landing on runway 18R to 18L also reduced the radius of the turn and increased the required angle of bank. The increased left banked turn, the right engine operating at a high-power setting, and the airplane's increased drag likely decreased the airplane airspeed below the airplane's minimum controllable airspeed (Vmc), which resulted in a loss of control.
Probable cause:
An engine malfunction for undetermined reasons and the subsequent loss of control, due to the pilot's improper decision to maneuver the airplane below minimum controllable airspeed and his improper response to the loss of engine power.
Final Report:

Crash of a Learjet 24F near Guadalajara: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jan 9, 2007 at 2323 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N444TW
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Laredo – Guadalajara
MSN:
24-348
YOM:
1977
Flight number:
AJI878
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
On January 9, 2007, at 2323 central standard time, a Gates Learjet model 24F airplane, N444TW, serial number 348, was destroyed upon impact with terrain, about 18.8 nautical miles east of Guadalajara, State of Jalisco, in the Republic of Mexico. The airline transport-rated pilot and the commercial pilot functioning as first officer were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to the Sierra American Corporation of Wilmington, Delaware, and was being operated by Ameristar Jet Charter, Inc., of Addison, Texas, as Ameristar flight 878, a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 on-demand cargo flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed for the flight from Laredo, Texas. The cargo flight had originated in Laredo, Texas, at about 2210, with the Don Miguel Hidalgo International Airport (MMGL) near Guadalajara, Mexico, as its intended destination. Mexican Air Traffic Control personnel reported that the flight had approached MMGL from the north. At 2313, Guadalajara Approach Control cleared the flight to descend to 12,000 feet, provided an altimeter setting of 30.28, and told the flight to expect radar vectors for the ILS runway 28 approach to MMGL. After being provided a vector of 190 to intercept the localizer for the ILS runway 28 approach, there were communications between the flight and the controller to clarify which runway was active, and at 2318:00, the flight was given a right turn to a heading of 200 degrees. At 2318:56 the flight was cleared to descend to 10,000 feet, and at 2320:38, the flight was cleared to descend to 9,000 feet. The airplane was last observed on radar descending through 9,200 feet, while crossing the GDL VOR 085 degree radial.
Probable cause:
Controlled flight into terrain.

Crash of a Rockwell Grand Commander 690 in Soto la Marina: 1 killed

Date & Time: Sep 16, 2003 at 1430 LT
Registration:
N302WB
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Soto La Marina - Laredo
MSN:
690-11003
YOM:
1971
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
On September 16, 2003, at 1430 central daylight time, an Aero Commander 690 twin-engine airplane, N302WB was destroyed upon impact with trees and terrain while attempting a takeoff from an airstrip near Soto La Marina, in the State of Tamaulipas, in the Republic of Mexico. The commercial pilot, sole occupant of the airplane, was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to the QEAT-4 LLC., in Naples, Florida, and was being operated by the MGS Corporation of Laredo, Texas. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the business flight for which no flight plan was filed. The flight's destination was reported to be Laredo, Texas. Local authorities reported that the turboprop powered airplane, serial number 11003, had previously sustained some damage to the nose landing gear and the owner had replaced the nose landing gear prior to attempting to depart from the airstrip.

Crash of a Douglas DC-3A-197D in Laredo

Date & Time: May 21, 2002 at 1100 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
XB-JBR
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Laredo - Laredo
MSN:
3261
YOM:
1940
Location:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew was completing a local post maintenance test flight at Laredo Airport. After several touch-and-goes, the aircraft was in initial climb when the left engine lost power, followed shortly later by the right engine. The crew reduced his altitude and ditched the aircraft in the Casa Blanca Lake, about 50 feet from the shore. All three crew members were evacuated safely while the aircraft sank in six feet of water.

Crash of a Rockwell Aero Commander 500B in Ennis: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jan 10, 1998 at 1427 LT
Registration:
N556BW
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Lancaster - Laredo
MSN:
500-1625-215
YOM:
1966
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
1550
Aircraft flight hours:
8081
Circumstances:
After departing on an IFR flight in VFR conditions, the flight had been cleared to climb from 3,000 to 4,000 feet, when the right engine lost power. The pilots diverted toward an uncontrolled airport, secured the right engine, & cancelled their IFR clearance. They made an approach to land on runway 15, then attempted a single engine go-around. During the go-around, the airplane yawed/rolled to the right in what the passenger believed was a VMC roll. It then struck power lines & crashed in a right wing low attitude. Investigation revealed that both pilots held multi-engine ratings. The owner said the pilot (PIC) had flown the airplane for a short time on 12/21/98; however, no other record was found to verify that either the pilot or copilot had flight experience in this make/model of airplane. Examination of the wreckage revealed evidence that the flaps were retracted, the landing gear was in transit, the left propeller was operating with power, & the right propeller was feathered. The airplane had a history of fuel flow fluctuations in the right engine. The diaphragm (P/N 364446) in the right engine distributor valve assembly was found ruptured. It was an old style diaphragm, which was colored black. Bendix Service Bulletin RS-76, issued 11/15/80, called for replacement of the black diaphragm with a red fluorosilicone diaphragm (P/N 245088) at overhaul. The engine was overhauled in June 1992. During maintenance in December 1997, both fuel system injectors & nozzles were tested; however, the distributor valve assembles were not tested. Calculations showed the airplane was loaded 116.3 lbs over the maximum allowable gross weight & 1.3 inches forward of the allowable CG range.
Probable cause:
failure of the flight crew to maintain minimum control speed (VMC) during go-around from a single-engine approach, which resulted in loss of control and collision with power lines and the ground. Related factors were: a ruptured diaphragm in the distributor valve (flow divider) of the right engine's fuel injector system, which resulted in loss of power in the right engine; inadequate maintenance; a failure to comply with Bendix Service Bulletin RS-76; the airplane's excessive gross weight and forward center-of-gravity (CG); and both pilots' lack of experience in this make and model of airplane.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft C-45H Expeditor in Mooringsport: 1 killed

Date & Time: Apr 6, 1993 at 0150 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N492DM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Pine Bluff - Laredo
MSN:
AF-804
YOM:
1954
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
10870
Captain / Total hours on type:
4020.00
Aircraft flight hours:
16268
Circumstances:
Radar data showed the airplane tracking north of the planned route. It made several heading changes, and descended to 500 feet msl. The pilot advised ATC that he was landing at Shreveport, and was assigned a transponder code. No further transmissions were received by ATC. The airplane impacted transmission lines, poles, and trees approx 19 miles northwest of the airport. Examination of the propellers revealed that the right spinner dome marks equated to 74°; the operating range is 17-35°. The three blades of the left propeller showed only leading edge damage at the tips. Examination of the right engine revealed the following: carbon buildup in the exhaust and intake manifolds, exhaust valves pitted and scored, valve seats worn and pitted, spark plugs worn, compression below 60 on 4 cylinders, and a separated magneto block with pitting and fretting. Time since last annual inspection by operator maintenance personnel was 78 hrs. The left engine and accessories were extensively damaged by fire. The pilot, sole on board, was killed.
Probable cause:
A total loss of right engine power, and a partial loss of left engine power, for undetermined reasons.
Final Report:

Crash of an Embraer EMB-120RT Brasília in Eagle Lake: 14 killed

Date & Time: Sep 11, 1991 at 1003 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N33701
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Laredo - Houston
MSN:
120-077
YOM:
1987
Flight number:
CO2574
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
11
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
14
Captain / Total flying hours:
4243
Captain / Total hours on type:
2468.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
11543
Copilot / Total hours on type:
1066
Aircraft flight hours:
7229
Aircraft flight cycles:
10009
Circumstances:
The airplane broke up in flight while descending from FL240. The horizontal stabilizer, or top of the T-type tail, had separated from the fuselage before ground impact. Examination revealed that the 47 screw fasteners that would have attached the upper surface of the leading edge assembly for the left side of the horizontal stabilizer were missing. They had been removed the night before during scheduled maintenance. Investigation revealed that there was a lack of compliance with the FAA-approved general maintenance manual procedures by the mechanics, inspectors, and supervisors responsible for assuring the airworthiness of the airplane the night before the accident. In addition, routine surveillance of the continental express maintenance department by the FAA was inadequate and did not detect deficiencies, such as those that led to this accident. All 14 occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
The failure of continental express maintenance and inspection personnel to adhere to proper maintenance and quality assurance procedures for the airplane's horizontal stabilizer deice boots that led to the sudden in-flight loss of the partially secured left horizontal stabilizer leading edge and the immediate severe nose down pitchover and breakup of the airplane. Contributing to the cause of the accident was the failure of continental express management to ensure compliance with the approved maintenance procedures, and the failure of the faa surveillance to detect and verify compliance with approved procedures.
Final Report:

Crash of a Douglas C-47A-70-DL in Laredo

Date & Time: Jan 18, 1989 at 2043 LT
Operator:
Registration:
XB-DYP
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Laredo - Torreón
MSN:
19239
YOM:
1943
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
8000
Captain / Total hours on type:
3800.00
Circumstances:
The pilot stated that during takeoff from runway 35L, the copilot on the flight controls reduced left propeller and right engine power at an altitude of less than 100 feet agl. He attempted to restore takeoff power while applying forward pressure on the control yoke, but lost control of the aircraft and impacted the terrain adjacent to the departure runway. He further stated that the cargo may have shifted to the rear of the aircraft during takeoff. The aircraft was destroyed and both pilots were seriously injured.
Probable cause:
The pic's disregard for the security of the cargo that permitted its shift during the takeoff roll. This resulted in an aft cg situation and a subsequent stall and loss of aircraft control. A contributing factor in the accident was the mismanagement of the engine power by the crew and the lack of experience of the copilot.
Occurrence #1: cargo shift
Phase of operation: takeoff - initial climb
Findings
1. (f) security of cargo - disregarded - pilot in command
2. (f) procedure inadequate - pilot in command
3. (c) aircraft weight and balance - exceeded
----------
Occurrence #2: loss of control - in flight
Phase of operation: takeoff - initial climb
Findings
4. (f) throttle/power control - reduced - copilot/second pilot
5. (f) lack of total experience in type of aircraft - copilot/second pilot
6. (f) propeller - reduced - copilot/second pilot
7. (c) airspeed (vs) - not maintained - pilot in command
8. Stall/mush - inadvertent - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #3: in flight collision with terrain/water
Phase of operation: descent - uncontrolled
Findings
9. Terrain condition - grass
Final Report:

Crash of a Hawker-Siddeley HS.125-600A in Houston: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jan 18, 1988 at 1010 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
XA-KUT
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Laredo - Houston
MSN:
256028
YOM:
1974
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
10000
Captain / Total hours on type:
4000.00
Aircraft flight hours:
2812
Circumstances:
Before takeoff, a pilot of XA-KUT was briefed that the Houston Hobby (HOU) weather was IFR with '. . . Indefinite ceiling zero sky obscured visibility's 1/16 of a mile and fog . . .' He was also advised IFR conditions were forecast until 0900 cst, gradually improving to marginal VFR by 1100 cst with 1,000 feet broken, 5 miles visibility and fog. The flight took off at 0900 cst. At HOU, arrival was delayed due to weather. The crew requested an ILS approach, with intentions of diverting if a missed approach was made. The RVR was variable. After being cleared for an ILS runway 04 approach, the pilot was advised the RVR had dropped to 1,400 feet. After changing to tower frequency, the flight was cleared to land and was told again the RVR was 1,400 feet. When the aircraft was on final approach, the pilots were advised of a low altitude alert. However, the aircraft continued below the decision height (dh), hit a 70 feet power line (approximately 6,500 feet short of the runway) and crashed. No preimpact malfunction of the aircraft or its systems was found. The ILS was flight checked, but only a minor discrepancy (concerning the outer marker width) was noted. The dh was 200 feet agl, minimum RVR for the approach was 2,400 feet. The copilot was killed and seven other occupants were injured, three seriously.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: in flight collision with object
Phase of operation: approach - faf/outer marker to threshold (ifr)
Findings
1. Weather condition - low ceiling
2. Weather condition - fog
3. Weather condition - obscuration
4. (f) weather condition - below approach/landing minimums
5. (c) ifr procedure - improper - pilot in command
6. (c) decision height - not identified - pilot in command
7. (f) object - wire, transmission
----------
Occurrence #2: in flight collision with terrain/water
Phase of operation: descent - uncontrolled
Final Report: