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Crash of a Cessna 560 Citation V in Atlanta: 4 killed

Date & Time: Dec 20, 2018 at 1210 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N188CW
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Atlanta - Millington
MSN:
560-0148
YOM:
1991
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
The aircraft was destroyed when it impacted a field after takeoff from Fulton County Airport-Brown Field (FTY), Atlanta, Georgia. The air transport pilot and three passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was owned and operated by Chen Aircrafts LLC. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 and had an intended destination of Millington-Memphis Airport (NQA), Millington, Tennessee. A review of preliminary radar data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that after departing from runway 8 at FTY, the airplane turned left toward the north climbing to about 3,225 ft msl (2,385 ft agl), then made a descending right 180-degree right turn to the south before radar contact was lost at an altitude of about 1,175 feet msl (335 ft agl). A video obtained from a security camera positioned on top of a building, located about a half mile from the accident site, captured the airplane in a descending left turn prior to rolling inverted until it was lost from view behind a tree line. According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot held an air transport pilot certificate with a rating for airplane multiengine land and a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and single-engine sea. The pilot was issued a secondclass medical certificate on May 31, 2018 and reported 2,300 hours of total flight experience and 150 hours of flight experience in the previous 6 months. According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 1991, and was most-recently registered to a corporation in July 2017. It was equipped with two Pratt & Whitney Canada, JT15D series engines, which could each produce 3,050 pounds of thrust. The 1216 recorded weather observation at FTY, which was about 1 mile to the southwest of the accident location, included wind from 050° at 10 knots, visibility 7 miles, overcast clouds at 600 ft above ground level (agl), temperature 8° C, dew point 8° C, and an altimeter setting of 29.52 inches of mercury.The airplane impacted a tree prior to impacting the field about 50 feet beyond the initial tree strike. All major components of the airplane were located in the vicinity of the wreckage. The debris path was about 325 ft long and was located on a 142° heading. The airplane was highly fragmented and dispersed along the debris path. The main wing spar was separated from the airframe and came to rest about 200 ft from the initial ground impact point. The empennage was impact-separated and located about 275 ft from the initial impact crater. Both engines were impact-separated from the airplane. The cockpit, cabin, and wings were highly fragmented. A cockpit voice recorder and an enhanced ground proximity warning system were located along the debris path and retained for data download. The airplane was moved to a secure facility and retained for further examination.

Crash of a Raytheon 390 Premier I in Atlanta: 2 killed

Date & Time: Dec 17, 2013 at 1924 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N50PM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Atlanta - New Orleans
MSN:
RB-80
YOM:
2003
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
7200
Captain / Total hours on type:
1030.00
Aircraft flight hours:
713
Circumstances:
The pilot and passenger departed on a night personal flight. A review of the cockpit voice recorder (CVR) transcript revealed that, immediately after departure, the passenger asked the pilot if he had turned on the heat. The pilot subsequently informed the tower air traffic controller that he needed to return to the airport. The controller then cleared the airplane to land and asked the pilot if he needed assistance. The pilot replied "negative" and did not declare an emergency. The pilot acknowledged to the passenger that it was hot in the cabin. The CVR recorded the enhanced ground proximity warning system (EGPWS) issue 11 warnings, including obstacle, terrain, and stall warnings; these warnings occurred while the airplane was on the downwind leg for the airport. The airplane subsequently impacted trees and terrain and was consumed by postimpact fire. Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed no malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. During the attempted return to the airport, possibly to resolve a cabin heat problem, the pilot was operating in a high workload environment due to, in part, his maneuvering visually at low altitude in the traffic pattern at night, acquiring inbound traffic, and being distracted by the reported high cabin temperature and multiple EGPWS alerts. The passenger was seated in the right front seat and in the immediate vicinity of the flight controls, but no evidence was found indicating that she was operating the flight controls during the flight. Although the pilot had a history of coronary artery disease, the autopsy found no evidence of a recent cardiac event, and an analysis of the CVR data revealed that the pilot was awake, speaking, and not complaining of chest pain or shortness of breath; therefore, it is unlikely that the pilot's cardiac condition contributed to the accident. Toxicological testing detected several prescription medications in the pilot's blood, lung, and liver, including one to treat his heart disease; however, it is unlikely that any of these medications resulted in impairment. Although the testing revealed that the pilot had used marijuana at some time before the accident, insufficient evidence existed to determine whether the pilot was impaired by its use at the time of the accident. Toxicology testing also detected methylone in the pilot's blood. Methylone is a stimulant similar to cocaine and Ecstasy, and its effects can include relaxation, euphoria, and excited calm, and it can cause acute changes in cognitive performance and impair information processing. Given the level of methylone (0.34 ug/ml) detected in the pilot's blood, it is likely that the pilot was impaired at the time of the accident. The pilot's drug impairment likely contributed to his failure to maintain control of the airplane.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain airplane control while maneuvering the airplane in the traffic pattern at night. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's impairment from the use of illicit drugs.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-31-T2 Cheyenne II-XL in Jackson: 5 killed

Date & Time: Jun 3, 2001 at 1611 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N31XL
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Malden – Atlanta
MSN:
31-8166003
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
9500
Captain / Total hours on type:
13.00
Aircraft flight hours:
6025
Circumstances:
About 20 minutes before the accident, the pilot reported to the air traffic controller that he had a problem with an engine and needed to shut the engine down. The flight had just leveled at 23,000 feet. The controller told the pilot that he was near Jackson, Tennessee, and that he could descend to 7,000 feet. About 10 minutes later, the pilot reported he was at 8,000 feet and requested radar vectors for the instrument landing system approach to runway 2 at the McKellar-Sipes Regional Airport, at Jackson. The pilot told the controller he had the left engine shut down. About 5 minutes later, the pilot reported he had a propeller runaway. About 1 minute later, the pilot reported he was in visual conditions and requested radar vectors direct to the airport. About 2 minutes later, the pilot reported he had a cloud layer under him and that he had the localizer frequency for runway 2 set. About 1 minute later, the pilot was told to contact the McKellar Airport control tower. The pilot acknowledged this instruction. No further transmissions were received from the flight. Examination of the left engine at the accident site showed the left propeller control was found disconnected at the point the propeller control extension bracket attaches to the propeller governor. The propeller control cable had also pulled loose from a swaged point at the control rod and was also separated further aft due to overstress. The housing for the propeller control rod was found securely attached to the engine and the control rod was securely attached to the extension bracket. The propeller governor control arm, which was disconnected from the propeller control cable and rod, was found spring loaded into the high RPM position. Examination of the fractured left propeller bracket assembly was performed by the NTSB Materials Laboratory, Washington, D.C. The bracket assembly was fractured in the area of the outermost eyehole, at the point a bolt passes through the bracket assembly and the propeller governor arm. The fracture surface contained small amounts of dirt, grease, and minor corrosion. The fracture surface features include flat areas that lie on multiple planes separated by ratchet marks, features typically left behind by the propagation of a fatigue crack. The fatigue crack emanated from multiple origins on opposite sides of the bracket. The total area of the fatigue crack occupied approximately 85 percent of the fracture surfaces. The fatigue fractures initiated on the outer edges of the surface and propagated inward toward the center. The remaining 15% of the fracture surface had features consistent with overstress separation. Near the middle of each fatigue region were microfissures suggesting that the crack propagated under high-stress conditions. The NTSB Materials Laboratory also examined the separation point between the left propeller control flexible cable and the rigid rod that connects to the bracket assembly. The cable and the swaged part of the rigid rod were in good condition with no fractures or damage. The Piper PA-31-T2 Pilot Operating Handbook, Section 3, Emergency Procedures, does not contain a procedure for loss of propeller control. Section 3 did contain a procedure for "Over speeding Propeller", which stated that if a propellers speed should exceed 1,976 rpm, to place the power lever of the engine with the over speeding propeller to idle, feather the propeller, place the engine condition lever in the stop position, and complete the engine shutdown procedures. Pilot logbook records show the pilot completed a simulator training course for the accident model airplane about 9 days before the accident and had about 13 flight hours in the Piper PA-31-T2.
Probable cause:
The pilot's shutting down the left engine following loss of control of the left propeller resulting in an in-flight loss of control of the airplane due to the windmilling propeller. Factors in the accident were the failure of the propeller control bracket assembly due to fatigue, the pilot's lack of experience in the type of airplane (turbo propeller) and the absence of a procedure for loss of propeller control in the airplane's flight manual.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft B60 Duke in Atlanta:1 killed

Date & Time: Aug 18, 2000 at 2244 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N8WD
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Houston – Atlanta-DeKalb-Peachtree
MSN:
P-258
YOM:
1974
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
1800
Aircraft flight hours:
2665
Circumstances:
The pilot had experienced engine problems during a flight and requested maintenance assistance from the local maintenance repair station. Before the maintenance personnel signed off and completed the repairs, the pilot refueled the airplane, and attempted an instrument flight back to the originating airport. While enroute, the pilot reported a low fuel situation, and deviated to a closer airport. During the approach, the airplane lost engine power on both engines, collided with trees, and subsequently the ground, about a half of a mile short of the intended runway. There was no fuel found in the fuel system at the accident site. No mechanical problems were discovered with the airplane during the post-accident examination. This accident was the second time the pilot had exhausted the fuel supply in this airplane.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to preflight plan adequate fuel for the flight that resulted in fuel exhaustion and the subsequent loss of engine power.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 425 Conquest in Sanford: 1 killed

Date & Time: Feb 11, 1988 at 2212 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N6771Y
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Atlanta - Sanford
MSN:
425-0019
YOM:
1981
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
8750
Aircraft flight hours:
2269
Circumstances:
The flight was cleared for a night ILS approach and advised that tower at destination had closed. Tower had reported at closing that fog was forming and the flight was advised of the fog. The aircraft was located on a remote part of the airport the next morning. The ELT had activated but the signal was weak due to crash damage. Passenger said they never saw runway lights, only taxi lights, and that pilot attempted to perform a go-around. Gear was retracted and aircraft hit level grassy area in a near level attitude. The pilot was not wearing a shoulder harness. The pax crouched in the aisle next to the pilot, helping him find the runway, not wearing restraining belts. No published approach plate for ILS procedure for that runway was found in aircraft. Toxicological report revealed pilot had 3 mcg/ml dextromethorphan, an ingredient found in over counter cold remedies. According to report, levels of that substance in blood greater than 0.1 mcg/ml was sufficient to cause drowsiness.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: in flight collision with terrain/water
Phase of operation: missed approach (ifr)
Findings
1. (f) weather condition - fog
2. (c) decision height - disregarded - pilot in command
3. (f) light condition - night
4. Meteorological services - not operating
5. (c) missed approach - improper - pilot in command
6. Control tower - not operating
7. (c) gear retraction - premature - pilot in command
8. (c) in-flight planning/decision - poor - pilot in command
9. (f) impairment (drugs) - pilot in command
10. Shoulder harness - not used - pilot in command
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft G18S in Atlanta

Date & Time: Dec 13, 1980 at 0601 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N9684R
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
BA-500
YOM:
1960
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2270
Captain / Total hours on type:
262.00
Circumstances:
During a night takeoff from Atlanta-Fulton County- Brown Field Airport, the decision of the pilot to abort the takeoff procedure was taken too late. The airplane overran, struck trees and crashed, bursting into flames. The aircraft was destroyed by fire and the pilot was seriously injured.
Probable cause:
Overrun and subsequent collision with trees on takeoff after the pilot delayed action in aborting takeoff. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Inadequate preflight preparation,
- Improperly loaded aircraft,
- Lack of familiarity with aircraft,
- Windshield dirty, vision restricted,
- The aircraft was at least 1,701 lbs over max gross weight,
- CofG 7,6 inches after the CG limits,
- The pilot accumulated 22 flying hours since 35 years layoff,
- Frost on window.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft U-8F Seminole in Atlanta: 3 killed

Date & Time: Feb 12, 1972 at 1543 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
61-2430
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
LF-29
YOM:
1961
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
On a final VOR approach to Atlanta-Fulton County-Brown Field Airport, the crew encountered marginal weather conditions. The aircraft went out of control and crashed few miles short of runway 08, bursting into flames. A pilot and two passengers were killed while three other occupants were seriously injured. The aircraft was on a round robin IFR service at the time of the accident.
Crew:
Cw3 Lawrence J. Screptock +1.
Passengers:
Ltc Joseph E. Burke Jr.,
Col Lester M. Conger +3.