Crash of a Grumman G-73 Mallard in Perth: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jan 26, 2017
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-CQA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Serpentine - Serpentine
MSN:
J-35
YOM:
1948
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The aircraft left Serpentine Airfield at 1628LT with a pilot and his wife on board. They were performing a demo flight vertical to Perth and the Swan River to take part to the Australian Day celebrations. While cruising at an altitude of about 150 feet, the pilot attempted a turn to the left when the aircraft lost height and crashed in a near vertical attitude into the Swan River. The aircraft was destroyed upon impact and both occupants were killed.

Crash of a Grumman G-73 Turbo Mallard off Miami: 20 killed

Date & Time: Dec 19, 2005 at 1439 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N2969
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Miami - Bimini
MSN:
J-27
YOM:
1947
Flight number:
OP101
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
18
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
20
Captain / Total flying hours:
2830
Captain / Total hours on type:
1630.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1420
Copilot / Total hours on type:
71
Aircraft flight hours:
31226
Aircraft flight cycles:
39743
Circumstances:
On December 19, 2005, about 1439 eastern standard time, a Grumman Turbo Mallard (G-73T) amphibious airplane, N2969, operated by Flying Boat, Inc., doing business as Chalk’s Ocean Airways flight 101, crashed into a shipping channel adjacent to the Port of Miami, Florida, shortly after takeoff from the Miami Seaplane Base. Flight 101 was a regularly scheduled passenger flight to Bimini, Bahamas, with 2 flight crewmembers and 18 passengers on board. The airplane’s right wing separated during flight. All 20 people aboard the airplane were killed, and the airplane was destroyed by impact forces. Flight 101 was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 on a visual flight rules flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident.
Probable cause:
The in-flight failure and separation of the right wing during normal flight, which resulted from:
1) The failure of the Chalk’s Ocean Airways maintenance program to identify and properly repair fatigue cracks in the right wing and
2) The failure of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to detect and correct deficiencies in the company’s maintenance program.
Final Report:

Crash of a Grumman G-73 Turbo Mallard off Key West: 2 killed

Date & Time: Mar 18, 1994 at 1143 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N150FB
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Key West Harbour - Key West
MSN:
J-51
YOM:
1950
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
7725
Captain / Total hours on type:
3100.00
Aircraft flight hours:
17119
Circumstances:
The flightcrew had completed a 14 cfr part 135 charter flight and had landed in the harbor at Key West, Florida. They had moored the seaplane and departed. About an hour later, they reboarded the seaplane to fly it to an airport for refueling, then to return to the harbor to board the passengers. During takeoff, the seaplane was observed to pitch nose up, roll left, and crash nose down in the harbor. Due to the damage done by tidal flow and recovery attempts, the exact condition of the aft bilge drain plugs was unknown. During a check of the CVR recording, the crew was not heard to call out the bilge pumps during the before-takeoff checklist. After lift-off, both pilots made comments about keeping the nose down due to water in the aft portion of the aircraft. Both pilots were killed.
Probable cause:
Failure of the pilot-in-command to assure the bilges were adequately pumped free of water (adequately preflighted), which resulted in the aft center of gravity limit to be exceeded, and failure of the aircrew to follow the checklist. A factor related to the accident was: the water leak.
Final Report:

Crash of a Grumman G-73 Mallard off Christiansted: 1 killed

Date & Time: Oct 28, 1986 at 0915 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N604SS
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Christiansted - Charlotte Amalie
MSN:
J-4
YOM:
1946
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
13
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
10340
Captain / Total hours on type:
195.00
Circumstances:
The pilots lost aileron control shortly after takeoff while in a left turn. The left turning tendencies of the aircraft could not be corrected and the aircraft crash landed in the Caribbean Sea. Post crash inspection of the aircraft revealed the left aileron control cable was trapped within a bundle of electrical wires and cables. This occurred when an electrical cable from a reverse current relay in the right wing to the main junction box in the left cabin area at the center wing was changed and secured. The aileron cable chafed through the protective cover of the large electrical cable. When contact was made with the metal electrical cable the aileron cable arched at several points and separated at two different points causing a loss of aileron control. A passenger was killed while 14 other occupants were rescued.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: airframe/component/system failure/malfunction
Phase of operation: climb
Findings
1. (c) electrical system, electric wiring - incorrect
2. (c) maintenance, service of aircraft/equipment - improper - company maintenance personnel
3. (c) electrical system, electric wiring - chafed
4. (c) electrical system, electric wiring - arcing
5. (c) flt control syst, aileron control - separation
6. (c) flt control syst, aileron control - loss, total
----------
Occurrence #2: loss of control - in flight
Phase of operation: climb
Findings
7. (c) aircraft handling - not possible - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #3: forced landing
Phase of operation: descent
----------
Occurrence #4: in flight collision with terrain/water
Phase of operation: landing - flare/touchdown
Findings
8. Terrain condition - water, rough
Final Report:

Crash of a Grumman G-73 Mallard off Avalon

Date & Time: Jan 14, 1979 at 1640 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N95DF
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Avalon - Long Beach
MSN:
J-19
YOM:
1947
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
9
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
6500
Captain / Total hours on type:
85.00
Circumstances:
While taking off from the Avalon harbour, the seaplane struck three successive waves. On impact, the left engine and the left were torn off. The aircraft came to rest and was damaged beyond repair. All 11 occupants escaped with minor injuries.
Probable cause:
Engine tearaway during takeoff run after the crew selected an unsuitable terrain and failed to abort takeoff. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Premature liftoff,
- Overload failure.
Final Report:

Crash of a Grumman G-73 Mallard into the Pacific Ocean: 4 killed

Date & Time: Sep 30, 1974
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N2965
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Anchorage - Kodiak
MSN:
J-24
YOM:
1947
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
15134
Captain / Total hours on type:
5.00
Circumstances:
The aircraft departed Anchorage on a seabird survey flight to Kodiak. While cruising over the north Pacific Ocean, the airplane crashed into the sea and was lost without trace. The pilot was unable to send any distress call. SAR operations were conducted but eventually suspended after few days as no trace of the aircraft nor the four occupants was found.
Probable cause:
As the aircraft was not recovered, the cause of the accident could not be determined.
Final Report:

Crash of a Grumman G-73 Mallard in Prince Rupert: 3 killed

Date & Time: Mar 5, 1974
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
CF-HPA
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Prince Rupert - Masset
MSN:
J-7
YOM:
1946
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
9
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
About two minutes after it took off from Prince Rupert seaplane base, the pilot initiated a turn when the airplane lost height and crashed onto a mountain slope located about 3 km southeast of Prince Rupert. The wreckage was found a day later and while seven occupants were rescued, three others, among them the pilot, were killed.

Crash of a Grumman G-73 Mallard off Avalon: 1 killed

Date & Time: May 27, 1967 at 1017 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N2968
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Avalon – San Diego
MSN:
J-25
YOM:
1947
Flight number:
216
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
7054
Captain / Total hours on type:
6271.00
Circumstances:
While leaving the Avalon-Pebbly Beach seaplane base, the airplane struck waves caused by an engine-boat. The airplane went out of control, overturned and crashed. A pilot was killed while three other occupants were injured. The aircraft was lost.
Probable cause:
The pilot added power to continue takeoff when the airplane struck waves and failed to abort takeoff.
Final Report:

Crash of a Grumman G-73 Mallard in Huron

Date & Time: May 3, 1967 at 0502 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N298GB
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
J-58
YOM:
1951
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
5500
Captain / Total hours on type:
50.00
Circumstances:
Shortly after a night takeoff from Huron-William Washington Howes Airport, while in initial climb, the seaplane stalled and crashed. Both occupants were seriously injured and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair. At the time of the accident, the OAT was 18° F (-8° C) with a relative high humidity.
Probable cause:
Inadequate preflight preparation on part of the pilot who decided to takeoff without deicing the airplane. The pilot took off with heavy accumulation of frost on wings.
Final Report: