code

NM

Crash of a Beechcraft A60 Duke near Santa Rosa: 2 killed

Date & Time: May 5, 2019 at 1559 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N102SN
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Arlington - Santa Fe
MSN:
P-217
YOM:
1973
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The twin engine airplane departed Arlington Municipal Airport at 1431LT bound for Santa Fe. En route, while cruising at an altitude of 9,700 feet, the pilot informed ATC about engine problems and was cleared to divert to Santa Rosa-Route 66 Airport at 1551. The pilot continued the descent when control was lost and the airplane crashed eight minutes later few miles from the airport. Both occupants have been killed.

Crash of a Beechcraft E90 King Air in Ruidoso: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jun 13, 2017 at 2210 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N48TA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Ruidoso – Abilene
MSN:
LW-283
YOM:
1978
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
1073
Captain / Total hours on type:
25.00
Aircraft flight hours:
12621
Circumstances:
The commercial pilot had filed an instrument flight rules flight plan and was departing in dark night visual meteorological conditions on a cross-country personal flight. A witness at the departure airport stated that during takeoff, the airplane sounded and looked normal. The witness said that the airplane lifted off about halfway down runway 24, and there was "plenty" of runway remaining for the airplane to land. The witness lost sight of the airplane and did not see the accident because the airport hangars blocked her view. The wreckage was located about 2,400 ft southeast of the departure end of runway 24. Examination of the accident site indicated that the airplane impacted in a nose-down attitude with a left bank of about 20°. A left turn during departure was consistent with the airport's published instrument departure procedures for obstacle avoidance, which required an immediate climbing left turn while proceeding to a navigational beacon located about 7 miles east-northeast of the airport. Examination of the wreckage did not reveal any evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation. The pilot had reportedly been awake for about 15 hours and was conducting the departure about the time he normally went to sleep and, therefore, may have been fatigued about the time of the event; however, given the available evidence, it was impossible to determine the role of fatigue in this event. Although the circumstances of the accident are consistent with spatial disorientation, there was insufficient evidence to determine whether it may have played a role in the sequence of events.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain clearance from terrain after takeoff during dark night conditions.
Final Report:

Crash of a Pilatus U-28A at Cannon AFB: 3 killed

Date & Time: Mar 14, 2017 at 1854 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
08-0724
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Cannon - Cannon
MSN:
724
YOM:
2006
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
The crew was performing a local training flight at Cannon AFB on behalf of the 318th Special Forces Operations Squadron. After performing several touch and goes maneuvers, the crew started a new approach when the single engine aircraft crashed in a field located near the 21st Street, north of the airbase. The airplane came to rest broken in two and a small fire erupted. All three crew were killed in the accident.
Crew:
Cpt Andrew Becker, pilot,
1st Lt Frederick Dellecker, copilot,
Cpt Kenneth Dalga, combat systems officer.

Crash of a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II in Clovis

Date & Time: Aug 9, 2015 at 0925 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N726JB
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Melrose – Clovis
MSN:
421B-0020
YOM:
1970
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3700
Captain / Total hours on type:
300.00
Circumstances:
The private pilot reported that he was approaching the airport for landing in the multi-engine airplane when both engines began to surge. The pilot attempted to switch to the auxiliary fuel tanks, but inadvertently switched the left engine fuel selector to the off position. The left engine subsequently experienced a total loss of engine power. On final approach for landing, the airplane impacted terrain and was subsequently consumed by a postimpact fire; the fuel onboard the airplane at the time of the accident could not be determined. An examination of the airplane's engines and systems revealed no mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.
Probable cause:
The pilot's improper management of fuel to the left engine during approach for landing, which resulted in a total loss of left engine power due to fuel starvation, and his subsequent failure to maintain control during the final landing approach, which resulted in collision with terrain.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421C Golden Eagle III in Las Cruces: 4 killed

Date & Time: Aug 27, 2014 at 1903 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N51RX
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Las Cruces – Phoenix
MSN:
421C-0871
YOM:
1974
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
2432
Captain / Total hours on type:
52.00
Aircraft flight hours:
8181
Circumstances:
According to the line service technician who worked for the fixed-base operator (FBO), before taking off for the air ambulance flight with two medical crewmembers and one patient onboard, the pilot verbally asked him to add 40 gallons of fuel to the airplane, but the pilot did not specify the type of fuel. The line service technician drove a fuel truck to the front of the airplane and added 20 gallons of fuel to each of the multiengine airplane's wing tanks. The pilot was present during the refueling and helped the line service technician replace both fuel caps. Shortly after takeoff, a medical crewmember called the company medical dispatcher and reported that they were returning to the airport because smoke was coming from the right engine. Two witnesses reported seeing smoke from the airplane Several other witnesses reported seeing or hearing the impact and then immediately seeing smoke or flames. On-scene evidence showed the airplane was generally eastbound and upright when it impacted terrain. A postimpact fire immediately ensued and consumed most of the airplane. Investigators who arrived at the scene the day following the accident reported clearly detecting the smell of jet fuel. The airplane, which was equipped with two reciprocating engines, should have been serviced with aviation gasoline, and this was noted on labels near the fuel filler ports, which stated "AVGAS ONLY." However, a postaccident review of refueling records, statements from the line service technician, and the on-scene smell of jet fuel are consistent with the airplane having been misfueled with Jet A fuel instead of the required 100LL aviation gasoline, which can result in detonation in the engine and the subsequent loss of engine power. Postaccident examination of the engines revealed internal damage and evidence of detonation. It was the joint responsibility of the line technician and pilot to ensure that the airplane was filled with aviation fuel instead of jet fuel and their failure to do so led to the detonation in the engine and the subsequent loss of power during initial climb.In accordance with voluntary industry standards, the FBO's jet fuel truck should have been equipped with an oversized fuel nozzle; instead, it was equipped with a smaller diameter nozzle, which allowed the nozzle to be inserted into the smaller fuel filler ports on airplanes that used aviation gasoline. The FBO's use of a small nozzle allowed it to be inserted in the accident airplane's filler port and for jet fuel to be inadvertently added to the airplane.
Probable cause:
The misfueling of the airplane with jet fuel instead of the required aviation fuel, and the resultant detonation and a total loss of engine power during initial climb. Contributing to the accident were the line service technician's inadvertent misfueling of the airplane, the pilot's inadequate supervision of the fuel servicing, and the fixed-base operator's use of a small fuel nozzle on its jet fuel truck.
Final Report:

Crash of a Gulfstream G650 in Roswell: 4 killed

Date & Time: Apr 2, 2011 at 0934 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N652GD
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Roswell - Roswell
MSN:
6002
YOM:
2010
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
11237
Captain / Total hours on type:
263.00
Aircraft flight hours:
434
Circumstances:
While taking off from runway 21 on a test flight (certification program), aircraft banked right and right wing hit the ground. Out of control, aircraft veered off runway to the right, lost its undercarriage and came to rest in flames near the tower. All four occupants, two test pilots and two engineers, were killed.
Probable cause:
An aerodynamic stall and subsequent uncommanded roll during a one engine-inoperative takeoff flight test, which were the result of (1) Gulfstream’s failure to properly develop and validate takeoff speeds for the flight tests and recognize and correct the takeoff safety speed (V2) error during previous G650 flight tests, (2) the G650 flight test team’s persistent and increasingly aggressive attempts to achieve V2 speeds that were erroneously low, and (3) Gulfstream’s inadequate investigation of previous G650 uncommanded roll events, which indicated that the company’s estimated stall angle of attack while the airplane was in ground effect was too high. Contributing to the accident was Gulfstream’s failure to effectively manage the G650 flight test program by pursuing an aggressive program schedule without ensuring that the roles and responsibilities of team members had been appropriately defined and implemented, engineering processes had received sufficient technical planning and oversight, potential hazards had been fully identified, and appropriate risk controls had been implemented and were functioning as intended.
Final Report:

Crash of a Partenavia P.68 Observer in Anthony

Date & Time: Nov 10, 2010 at 1100 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N44956
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
El Paso - El Paso
MSN:
318-13/OB
YOM:
1983
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
4562
Captain / Total hours on type:
106.00
Aircraft flight hours:
7065
Circumstances:
While performing a low-level law enforcement patrol flight, the pilot crossed a ridge and observed a parked vehicle. To investigate further, he lowered the flaps and descended to approximately 200 feet, into a canyon. The pilot made a second pass over the vehicle and initiated a right turn, during which the airplane encountered a tailwind that resulted in a rapid loss of airspeed and a descent. The pilot leveled the airplane and increased the power; however, the airplane was too slow and low to turn out of the canyon. As a result, the airplane stalled and impacted terrain. The pilot stated there were no preflight mechanical malfunctions or anomalies with the airplane.
Probable cause:
The pilot's decision to conduct a low-level flight in mountainous terrain in an area where downdrafts were prevalent, resulting in the inadvertent loss of control and the collision with the terrain.
Final Report:

Crash of a Pilatus PC-12 in Santa Fe: 1 killed

Date & Time: Sep 29, 2008 at 2216 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N606SL
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
New York-Lubbock-Santa Fe
MSN:
1020
YOM:
2008
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:

The pilot, owner of the Gardner Leasing Company, was performing a delivery flight from New York to Santa Fe with a refuelling stop at Lubbock, Texas. On final approach by night, the single engine crashed few miles from Santa Fe-Smith airport. The pilot, sole occupant, was killed.

Crash of a Beechcraft King Air 90 in Ruidoso: 5 killed

Date & Time: Aug 5, 2007 at 2141 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N369CD
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Ruidoso-Albuquerque
MSN:
LW-162
YOM:
1975
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
2775
Captain / Total hours on type:
23.00
Aircraft flight hours:
10358
Circumstances:

The twin engine aircraft was performing an ambulance flight from Ruidoso to Albuquerque with two doctors, one female patient, one baby of 15 months and one pilot. Few minutes after takeoff, the aircraft crashed in the Devils Canyon located 3 miles northeast of Ruidoso airport. Nobody survived.

Crash of a Piper PA-31 Navajo Chieftain in Gallup: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 29, 2004 at 1018 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N573B
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Glendale-Newton
MSN:
31-7530008
YOM:
1975
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
936
Captain / Total hours on type:
62.00
Aircraft flight hours:
6773
Circumstances:
The pilot was performing a private flight from Glendale (Arizona) to Newton (Kansas), when he informed ATC about engine problem. He decided to divert to Gallup, New Mexico, but the twin engine aircraft crashed in a desert few kilometers short of runway. The pilot was killed upon impact.