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Crash of a Mitsubishi MU-2B-60 Marquise in Hattiesburg: 4 killed

Date & Time: May 4, 2021 at 2305 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N322TA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Shepard AFB - Destin
MSN:
760
YOM:
1980
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
On May 4, 2021, about 2305 central daylight time, a Mitsubishi MU-2B-60 airplane, N322TA, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Hattiesburg, Mississippi. The pilot and two passengers were fatally injured. The airplane collided with a private residence; one occupant was fatally injured, and two other occupants sustained minor injuries. The airplane was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. According to Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the flight departed Wichita Falls Municipal Airport (SPS), Wichita Falls, Texas, about 2057 and was en route to the Bobby L Chain Municipal Airport (HBG), Hattiesburg, Mississippi. The pilot had filed and activated an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan. The pilot requested and received clearance to fly the RNAV 13 approach to HBG. The airplane flew to the initial approach fix, performed the procedure turn, and flew a portion of the final approach course. The last ADS-B point was recorded at 2300 about 1.6 miles northwest from the accident site, at an altitude of 1,475 ft mean sea level (msl). An Alert Notification (ALNOT) was issued by air traffic control when the pilot did not provide a cancellation radio call as required after the instrument approach to a non-towered airport. At 2320, law enforcement received a 911 call reporting the accident. There were no radio distress calls recorded from the pilot. The airplane impacted the front section of an occupied residence about 2.2 miles from the approach end of runway 13. A post impact fire ensued and consumed a majority of the airplane and the residential structure. Cockpit instrumentation was mostly consumed by the post-impact fire. The flaps were found at 20° down, and landing gear was extended at the time of impact. According to FAA records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine land, multiengine land, and instrument airplane. Documents provided by his MU-2 training facility revealed the pilot completed a flight review in the accident airplane on November 13, 2020, and completed Advisory Circular 91-89 approved MU-2 recurrent training on November 14, 2020. The pilot had purchased the airplane in February 2012. An associate of the pilot reported that the pilot owned a MU-2F model before he acquired the B model. On June 24, 2020, the pilot was issued a second-class medical certificate. On the medical certificate application, the pilot reported having accrued 7,834 total hours. The airplane was not equipped, and was not required to be equipped, with any type of crashresistant recorder device.

Crash of a Beechcraft 60 Duke in Destin: 4 killed

Date & Time: Aug 30, 2018 at 1030 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N1876L
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Toledo - Destin
MSN:
P-386
YOM:
1976
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
2427
Captain / Total hours on type:
100.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4167
Circumstances:
The commercial pilot and three passengers departed on a cross-country flight in a twin-engine airplane. As the flight neared the destination airport, the pilot canceled his instrument flight rules (IFR) clearance. The approach controller transferred the flight to the tower controller, and the pilot reported to the tower controller that the airplane was about 2 miles from the airport. However, the approach controller contacted the tower controller to report that the airplane was 200 ft over a nearby joint military airport at the time. GPS data revealed that, when pilot reported that the airplane was 2 miles from the destination airport, the airplane's actual location was about 10 miles from the destination airport and 2 miles from the joint military airport. The airplane impacted a remote wooded area about 8 miles northwest of the destination airport. At the time of the accident, thunderstorm cells were in the area. A review of the weather information revealed that the pilot's view of the airport was likely obscured because the airplane was in an area of light precipitation, restricting the pilot's visibility. A review of airport information noted that the IFR approach course for the destination airport passes over the joint military airport. The Federal Aviation Administration chart supplement for the destination airport noted the airport's proximity to the other airport. However, it is likely that the pilot mistook the other airport for the destination airport due to reduced visibility because of weather. The accident circumstances were consistent with controlled flight into terrain. The ethanol detected in the pilot's blood specimens but not in his urine specimens was consistent with postmortem bacteria production. The carbon monoxide and cyanide detected in the pilot's blood specimens were consistent with inhalation after the postimpact fire.
Probable cause:
The pilot's controlled flight into terrain after misidentifying the destination airport during a period of restricted visibility due to weather.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421C Golden Eagle III in Demopolis: 7 killed

Date & Time: Jul 9, 2011 at 1740 LT
Registration:
N692TT
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Creve Cœur – Destin
MSN:
421C-0616
YOM:
1979
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Captain / Total flying hours:
1000
Captain / Total hours on type:
340.00
Aircraft flight hours:
7800
Circumstances:
The multi-engine airplane was in cruise flight at flight level 210 when the pilot declared an emergency due to a rough-running right engine and diverted to a non-towered airport about 10 miles from the airplane’s position. About 4 minutes later, the pilot reported that he had shut down the right engine. The pilot orbited around the diversion airport during the descent and reported to an air traffic controller that he did not believe he would require any assistance after landing. The airplane initially approached the airport while descending through about 17,000 feet mean sea level (msl) and circled above the airport before entering a left traffic pattern approach for runway 22. About 7,000 feet msl, the airplane was about 2.5 miles northeast of the airport. The airplane descended through 2,300 feet msl when it was abeam the runway threshold on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern. According to the airplane information manual, procedures for landing with an inoperative engine call for “excessive altitude;” however, the airplane's last radar return showed the airplane at an altitude of 700 feet msl (about 600 feet above ground level) and about 3 miles from the approach end of the runway. The airplane was configured for a single-engine landing and was likely on or turning to the final approach course when it rolled and impacted trees. The airplane came to rest in a wooded area about 0.8 miles north of the runway threshold, inverted, in a flat attitude with no longitudinal deformation. A majority of the airplane, including the cockpit, main cabin, and left wing, were consumed by a postcrash fire. Search operations located the airplane about 6 hours after its expected arrival time. Due to the severity of the postcrash fire, occupant survivability after the impact could not be determined. Examination of the airframe, the left engine, and both propellers did not reveal any preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. The investigation revealed that the right engine failed when the camshaft stopped rotating after the camshaft gear experienced a fatigue fracture on one of its gear teeth. The remaining gear teeth were fractured in overstress and/or were crushed due to interference contact with the crankshaft gear. Spalling observed on an intact gear tooth suggested abnormal loading of the camshaft gear; however, the origin of the abnormal loading could not be determined.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain airplane control during a single-engine approach and his failure to fly an appropriate traffic pattern for a single-engine landing. Contributing to the accident was a total loss of engine power on the right engine due to a fatigue failure of the right engine cam gear.
Final Report:

Crash of a PZL-Mielec AN-2TP in Loxley

Date & Time: Apr 11, 2011 at 1216 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N122AN
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Destin – DeRidder
MSN:
1G176-31
YOM:
1977
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
4888
Captain / Total hours on type:
21.00
Aircraft flight hours:
10371
Circumstances:
According to the pilot, during cruise flight the engine began to run rough and lose power. He heard a loud metallic sound; the engine vibrated violently and then lost power. He performed a forced landing to a farm field, and the airplane nosed over in the soft terrain, resulting in substantial damage to the wings. A postaccident inspection revealed that the crankshaft would not rotate. An internal inspection of the cylinders and spark plugs did not reveal a reason for the power loss. The oil system was examined and there were large amounts of metal particles in the oil. Due to a lack of suitable equipment and facilities, further disassembly of the engine was not attempted.
Probable cause:
A loss of engine power due to internal failure.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-46-350P Malibu Mirage off Destin: 3 killed

Date & Time: Nov 23, 2010 at 1930 LT
Registration:
N548C
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
New Orleans – Destin
MSN:
46-36322
YOM:
2001
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
408
Captain / Total hours on type:
34.00
Aircraft flight hours:
761
Circumstances:
The instrument-rated pilot was executing a night instrument approach when the airplane impacted the water. The published approach minimums for the area navigation/global positioning system approach were 460-foot ceiling and one-mile visibility. Recorded air traffic control voice and radar data indicated that prior to the approach the pilot had turned to an approximately 180-degree heading and appeared to be heading in the direction of another airport. The controller reassigned the pilot a heading in order to intercept the final approach. The airplane was located in the water approximately 5,000 feet from the runway threshold. A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the left main landing gear was in the retracted position and the right main and nose landing gear were in the extended position. Examination of the left main landing gear actuator revealed no mechanical anomalies. The pilot had likely just commanded the landing gear to the down position and the landing gear was in transit. It is further possible that, as the gear was in transit, the airplane impacted the water in a left-wing and nose-down attitude and the left gear was forced to a gear-up position.
Probable cause:
Controlled flight into water due to the pilot's improper descent below the published minimum descent altitude.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-46-310P Malibu in Destin: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jan 1, 1994 at 1420 LT
Registration:
N243KW
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Naples - Destin
MSN:
46-8508089
YOM:
1985
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
4000
Captain / Total hours on type:
1262.00
Aircraft flight hours:
1262
Circumstances:
The pilot was executing an ASR approach to runway 32 and 9 seconds after the approach controller advised the pilot that the flight was over the missed approach point, the pilot advised the controller that the airport was in sight and he would be circling to land. The controller acknowledged this and witnesses observed the airplane flying northwesterly west of runway 32 about 150-200 feet above ground level. They then observed the airplane enter a left bank between 60-80 degrees and the airplane pitched nose down and collided with trees then a fence and the ground. There was a small post crash fire which was extinguished by the fire department. Examination of the airframe revealed no evidence of preimpact failure or malfunction of the flight controls. The engine was removed and placed on a test bench and after replacement of several components which were impact damaged, the engine started and operated normally. The passenger was seated in the furthest aft right seat and the lap belt attach point on the right side of this seat failed due to overload.
Probable cause:
Airspeed not maintained, inadvertent stall/mush, and altitude inadequate for recovery from the inflight loss of control by the pilot-in-command while circling for landing.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-61 Aerostar (Ted Smith 601P) in Destin: 3 killed

Date & Time: Dec 8, 1982 at 2230 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N90692
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Destin – Huntsville
MSN:
61P-0335-097
YOM:
1976
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
959
Captain / Total hours on type:
200.00
Aircraft flight hours:
1035
Circumstances:
Two minutes after takeoff the pilot reported a loss of the left engine. He was immediately cleared for a landing at Eglin AFB. While maneuvering for a landing the left engine and wing separated from the aircraft. The engine was separated from the wing and showed evidence of in flight fire. The most intense heat was in the engine accessory section in the area between the bendix fuel servo and the inboard turbocharger. There was extensive fire damage to the oil and fuel lines on the right side of the accessory section, the oil dipstick showed no oil and there was no evidence to show that the oil had spilled in the impact crater. About 25 min prior to takeoff the pilot telephoned the maintenance facility who had accomplished recent major repairs on the aircraft and related he was experiencing difficulty with the left throttle. The pilot was advised to have a mechanic check it out. All three occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: fire
Phase of operation: takeoff - initial climb
Findings
1. (f) operation with known deficiencies in equipment - attempted - pilot in command
2. (c) engine assembly - failure,total
3. (c) engine assembly - fire
4. (c) engine assembly - undetermined
----------
Occurrence #2: forced landing
Phase of operation: maneuvering - turn to landing area (emergency)
----------
Occurrence #3: airframe/component/system failure/malfunction
Phase of operation: maneuvering - turn to landing area (emergency)
Findings
5. (c) wing,spar - fire
6. (c) wing,spar - failure,total
7. (c) wing - separation
----------
Occurrence #4: in flight collision with terrain/water
Phase of operation: maneuvering - turn to landing area (emergency)
Final Report:

Crash of a Consolidated OA-10B Catalina off Fort Walton Beach: 3 killed

Date & Time: Sep 27, 1946 at 1400 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
45-57837
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Crew on board:
7
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
The crew was performing takeoffs and landings on rough sea off Fort Walton Beach. On takeoff, the seaplane hit waves and plunged into the water. As only one watertight door was closed, a huge amount of water flood into the plane that sank quickly about 15 miles offshore. Four crew members were rescued while three others were killed. The aircraft was never recovered.
Source: http://aviation-safety.net/wikibase/wiki.php?id=166047
Probable cause:
It appears that the pilot of command, in transition at the time of the accident, was practicing against regulations.