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Harjumaa

Crash of an Airbus A320-214 in Tallinn

Date & Time: Feb 16, 2018 at 1711 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ES-SAN
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Tallinn - Tallinn
MSN:
1213
YOM:
2000
Flight number:
MYX9001
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
7
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The aircraft departed Tallinn-Lennart Meri-Ülemiste Airport in the afternoon to perform a local training flight, carrying one instructor, a second captain, four student pilots and an inspector from the Civil Aviation Authority. The crew complete several circuits, approaches, touch-and-go manoeuvres and also a full stop. At 1704LT, the crew started a new approach to runway 08 when something wrong happened with the airplane that apparently failed to respond to the crew instructions. The aircraft continued to descend and landed too hard. Upon impact, both engines struck the runway surface, the main landing doors were partially torn off and the transponder stopped transmitting. The crew declared an emergency, the instructor resumed control and initiated a go-around. Following a 'normal' approach to runway 26, the airplane landed then started the braking procedure when two loud bangs were recorded. The aircraft went out of control and veered off runway to the left before coming to rest in snow. All seven occupants escaped, two of them were slightly injured. The aircraft was considered as damaged beyond repair and later transferred to Calw, Germany, to be used as a military training aid.

Crash of an Antonovv AN-26B in Tallinn

Date & Time: Aug 25, 2010 at 1747 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
SP-FDP
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
EXN3788
MSN:
119 03
YOM:
1982
Flight number:
Tallinn - Helsinki
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
5569
Captain / Total hours on type:
4432.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
738
Copilot / Total hours on type:
485
Aircraft flight hours:
21510
Circumstances:
On 25th August 2010 cargo aircraft An-26B, registration SP-FDP started from Tallinn-Lennart Meri-Ülemiste Airport to Helsinki. After uneventful flight preparations, the aircraft started its take-off roll on runway 08. Based on pilots statements and FDR/CVR recordings the aircraft entered runway 08 from taxiway B on the West end of the runway and lined up for takeoff. On 16:47:22 the aircraft started its takeoff roll. The calculated V1 was 182 and Vr was 201 km/h. 10 seconds later PF started rotation without Vr callout at 123 km/h. The aircraft pitch angle increased to 4.6˚ 2 seconds later. At 16:47:38 the navigator made V1 call-out at 160.5 km/h. 1 second later flight engineer called “Retracting” in Polish. The aircraft started to pitch down and 3 seconds later it contacted the runway and continued on its belly for 1,228 m before coming to its rest position 3 m right from the runway centerline. No persons were injured and no fire broke up. The occurrence was classified as an accident due to the substantial damage to the aircraft structures.
Probable cause:
The investigation determined the inadequate action of the flight engineer, consisting in early and uncommanded landing gear retraction, as a cause of the accident.
Contributing factors to the accident were:
1. Inadequate crew recourse management and insufficient experience in cooperation and coordination between crewmembers.
2. Start of aircraft rotation at low speed and with fast elevator movement to 17˚, which resulted in:
Lifting the aircraft sufficiently to close the WOW switch and allow the retraction of the landing gear at the speed not sufficient for the climb.
Providing misleading information to FE about the aerodynamic status of the aircraft.
3. Inadequate adjustment of the WOW switch, which allowed the gear retraction to be activated before the aircraft was airborne. The position of the landing gear selector on the central console is not considered as a contributing factor to the accident. However, investigation finds necessary to point it out as a safety concern, specifically in situations, where crewmembers are trained and/or used to operate the aircrafts with gear selector location according to the EASA Certification Standards CS-25. Positioning of the gear lever to the location which is compliant to EASA document CS-25, would create additional safety barrier to avoid similar occurrences, specifically in aircrafts where landing gear is operated by FE.
Final Report:

Crash of an Antonov AN-26B in Tallinn

Date & Time: Mar 18, 2010 at 1018 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
SP-FDO
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Helsinki – Tallinn
MSN:
105 03
YOM:
1980
Flight number:
EXN3589
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
4695
Captain / Total hours on type:
2295.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
990
Copilot / Total hours on type:
495
Aircraft flight hours:
25941
Circumstances:
Exin Co was operating An-26B for regular cargo flight between Tallinn and Helsinki. The crew performed last maintenance check in Tallinn on previous day and made uneventful flight to Helsinki on 17th March afternoon. Next morning the aircraft took off from Helsinki for regular flight EXN3589 to Tallinn at 09:46 local time. The takeoff weight was 23,954 kg, 46 kg below the MTOW. Four crewmembers, company mechanic and one cargo attendant were on board. During takeoff crew used RU 19-300 APU for additional thrust as prescribed in AFM. The RU 19-300 was shot down after takeoff. The flight was uneventful until 08:14:50, 9.5 nm from the runway 26. When power levers were retarded to flight idle crew noticed engine vibration and smelled a smoke in the cockpit. The engine chip detector indicator in the cockpit was lit. After short discussion about which engine should be shot down the flight engineer shot down the left engine and the captain tried to start the RU19A-300 (APU) to gain more thrust. During the approach the air traffic controller noticed the aircraft deviation from the approach path to the left and notified the crew. According to the FDR and CVR data the crew was unable to maintain a proper approach path both in lateral and vertical dimensions. The attempts to start RU19A-300 engine failed. Visual contact with the RWY was established 0.5 nm from the threshold. The aircraft crossed the airport boundary being not configured for landing and with IAS 295-300 km/h. The flaps were extended for 10˚ over the threshold; the landing gear was lowered after passing the RWY threshold and retracted again. The aircraft made a high speed low path over the runway on ca 10-15 feet altitude with the landing gear traveling down and up again. Flaps were extended over runway, and then retracted again seconds before impact. At the end of the RWY the full power on right engine was selected, aircraft climbed 15-20 feet and started turning left. Crew started retracting flaps and lowered landing gear. Aircraft crossed the highway at the end of the RWY on altitude ca 30 feet, then descended again, collided with the treetops at the lake shore and made crash-landing on the snow and ice-covered lake waterline. Due to the thick ice the aircraft remained on the ice and glided 151 m on the ice with heading 238˚ before coming to full stop. After the impact the flight engineer shoot down the RH engine and power and released all engine fire extinguishers. All persons onboard escaped immediately through the main door. No emergency was declares and despite suggestions from FO go-around was not commanded.
Probable cause:
Causes of the accident:
1. The failure of the left engine lubrication oil system, leading to the failure of the rear compressor bearing and inflight engine failure.
2. The failure of the crew to maintain the approach path and adhere to single engine landing procedures.
Factors contributing to the accident:
1. Improper and insufficient crew training, inter alia complete absence of simulator training.
2. The lack of effective coordination between crewmembers.
3. The failure of the crew to start RU19A-300 (APU).
4. Adverse weather conditions.
5. Inadequate company supervision by Polish CAA, consisting in not noticing the lack.
of flight crew training and companies generally pour safety culture.
6. Inadequate company maintenance practices, leaving preexisting breather duct failure unnoticed.
Final Report:

Crash of a PZL-Mielec AN-28PD in Tallinn: 2 killed

Date & Time: Feb 10, 2003 at 1942 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ES-NOY
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Tallinn - Helsinki
MSN:
1AJ006-04
YOM:
1989
Flight number:
ENI827
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
10856
Captain / Total hours on type:
510.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
2827
Copilot / Total hours on type:
475
Aircraft flight hours:
1428
Aircraft flight cycles:
2141
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft departed Tallinn-Ülemiste Airport on a mail flight to Helsinki, carrying three crew members (two pilots and one mechanic) and a load consisting of 514 kilos of mail. Four seconds after lift off from runway 08, while climbing to a height of 12 metres and at a speed of 170 km/h, the left engine suffered vibrations. The power lever for the left engine was brought back to idle then in a full forward position. Nevertheless, the aircraft lost height, nosed down and crashed in a wooded area located one km past the runway end. Both pilots were killed and the mechanic was seriously injured.
Probable cause:
It was determined that the right engine failed during initial climb following the rupture of a turbine ball bearing due to poor lubrication.
Final Report:

Crash of a Junkers JU.52/3mge off Keri Island: 9 killed

Date & Time: Jun 14, 1940 at 1500 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
OH-ALL
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Tallinn – Helsinki
MSN:
5494
YOM:
1936
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
9
Circumstances:
Shortly after take off from Tallinn-Ylemiste Airport, while overflying the Gulf of Finland, the three engine aircraft christened 'Kaleva' was shot down by the pilots of two Soviet Air Force Tupolev SB-2. Out of control, the aircraft crashed into the sea off the Keri Island, killing all nine occupants.
Probable cause:
Shot down by two Soviet fighters.

Crash of a Junkers F.13 off Tallinn

Date & Time: May 28, 1927
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
K-SALA
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Helsinki – Tallinn
MSN:
700
YOM:
1924
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
While landing off Tallinn, the seaplane went out of control and crashed into the sea. All five occupants were slightly injured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair. Exact causes of the accident unknown.

Crash of a Junkers F.13 in Tallinn: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jan 24, 1926
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
E-13
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Tallinn - Helsinki
MSN:
646
YOM:
1923
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from Tallinn Airport, engine lost power. Aircraft stalled and crashed. The pilot Harald Stunde and three passengers were injured while a fourth passenger, Mr. Jakob Tillo, was killed.
Probable cause:
It seems that accident is attributable to the cold benzol used in the engine probably having clogged carburetor.