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Crash of an Airbus A320-214 in Tallinn

Date & Time: Feb 16, 2018 at 1711 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ES-SAN
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Tallinn - Tallinn
MSN:
1213
YOM:
2000
Flight number:
MYX9001
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
7
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The aircraft departed Tallinn-Lennart Meri-Ülemiste Airport in the afternoon to perform a local training flight, carrying one instructor, a second captain, four student pilots and an inspector from the Civil Aviation Authority. The crew complete several circuits, approaches, touch-and-go manoeuvres and also a full stop. At 1704LT, the crew started a new approach to runway 08 when something wrong happened with the airplane that apparently failed to respond to the crew instructions. The aircraft continued to descend and landed too hard. Upon impact, both engines struck the runway surface, the main landing doors were partially torn off and the transponder stopped transmitting. The crew declared an emergency, the instructor resumed control and initiated a go-around. Following a 'normal' approach to runway 26, the airplane landed then started the braking procedure when two loud bangs were recorded. The aircraft went out of control and veered off runway to the left before coming to rest in snow. All seven occupants escaped, two of them were slightly injured. The aircraft was considered as damaged beyond repair and later transferred to Calw, Germany, to be used as a military training aid.

Crash of an Antonovv AN-26B in Tallinn

Date & Time: Aug 25, 2010 at 1747 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
SP-FDP
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
EXN3788
MSN:
119 03
YOM:
1982
Flight number:
Tallinn - Helsinki
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
5569
Captain / Total hours on type:
4432.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
738
Copilot / Total hours on type:
485
Aircraft flight hours:
21510
Circumstances:
On 25th August 2010 cargo aircraft An-26B, registration SP-FDP started from Tallinn-Lennart Meri-Ülemiste Airport to Helsinki. After uneventful flight preparations, the aircraft started its take-off roll on runway 08. Based on pilots statements and FDR/CVR recordings the aircraft entered runway 08 from taxiway B on the West end of the runway and lined up for takeoff. On 16:47:22 the aircraft started its takeoff roll. The calculated V1 was 182 and Vr was 201 km/h. 10 seconds later PF started rotation without Vr callout at 123 km/h. The aircraft pitch angle increased to 4.6˚ 2 seconds later. At 16:47:38 the navigator made V1 call-out at 160.5 km/h. 1 second later flight engineer called “Retracting” in Polish. The aircraft started to pitch down and 3 seconds later it contacted the runway and continued on its belly for 1,228 m before coming to its rest position 3 m right from the runway centerline. No persons were injured and no fire broke up. The occurrence was classified as an accident due to the substantial damage to the aircraft structures.
Probable cause:
The investigation determined the inadequate action of the flight engineer, consisting in early and uncommanded landing gear retraction, as a cause of the accident.
Contributing factors to the accident were:
1. Inadequate crew recourse management and insufficient experience in cooperation and coordination between crewmembers.
2. Start of aircraft rotation at low speed and with fast elevator movement to 17˚, which resulted in:
Lifting the aircraft sufficiently to close the WOW switch and allow the retraction of the landing gear at the speed not sufficient for the climb.
Providing misleading information to FE about the aerodynamic status of the aircraft.
3. Inadequate adjustment of the WOW switch, which allowed the gear retraction to be activated before the aircraft was airborne. The position of the landing gear selector on the central console is not considered as a contributing factor to the accident. However, investigation finds necessary to point it out as a safety concern, specifically in situations, where crewmembers are trained and/or used to operate the aircrafts with gear selector location according to the EASA Certification Standards CS-25. Positioning of the gear lever to the location which is compliant to EASA document CS-25, would create additional safety barrier to avoid similar occurrences, specifically in aircrafts where landing gear is operated by FE.
Final Report:

Crash of an Antonov AN-26B in Tallinn

Date & Time: Mar 18, 2010 at 1018 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
SP-FDO
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Helsinki – Tallinn
MSN:
105 03
YOM:
1980
Flight number:
EXN3589
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
4695
Captain / Total hours on type:
2295.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
990
Copilot / Total hours on type:
495
Aircraft flight hours:
25941
Circumstances:
Exin Co was operating An-26B for regular cargo flight between Tallinn and Helsinki. The crew performed last maintenance check in Tallinn on previous day and made uneventful flight to Helsinki on 17th March afternoon. Next morning the aircraft took off from Helsinki for regular flight EXN3589 to Tallinn at 09:46 local time. The takeoff weight was 23,954 kg, 46 kg below the MTOW. Four crewmembers, company mechanic and one cargo attendant were on board. During takeoff crew used RU 19-300 APU for additional thrust as prescribed in AFM. The RU 19-300 was shot down after takeoff. The flight was uneventful until 08:14:50, 9.5 nm from the runway 26. When power levers were retarded to flight idle crew noticed engine vibration and smelled a smoke in the cockpit. The engine chip detector indicator in the cockpit was lit. After short discussion about which engine should be shot down the flight engineer shot down the left engine and the captain tried to start the RU19A-300 (APU) to gain more thrust. During the approach the air traffic controller noticed the aircraft deviation from the approach path to the left and notified the crew. According to the FDR and CVR data the crew was unable to maintain a proper approach path both in lateral and vertical dimensions. The attempts to start RU19A-300 engine failed. Visual contact with the RWY was established 0.5 nm from the threshold. The aircraft crossed the airport boundary being not configured for landing and with IAS 295-300 km/h. The flaps were extended for 10˚ over the threshold; the landing gear was lowered after passing the RWY threshold and retracted again. The aircraft made a high speed low path over the runway on ca 10-15 feet altitude with the landing gear traveling down and up again. Flaps were extended over runway, and then retracted again seconds before impact. At the end of the RWY the full power on right engine was selected, aircraft climbed 15-20 feet and started turning left. Crew started retracting flaps and lowered landing gear. Aircraft crossed the highway at the end of the RWY on altitude ca 30 feet, then descended again, collided with the treetops at the lake shore and made crash-landing on the snow and ice-covered lake waterline. Due to the thick ice the aircraft remained on the ice and glided 151 m on the ice with heading 238˚ before coming to full stop. After the impact the flight engineer shoot down the RH engine and power and released all engine fire extinguishers. All persons onboard escaped immediately through the main door. No emergency was declares and despite suggestions from FO go-around was not commanded.
Probable cause:
Causes of the accident:
1. The failure of the left engine lubrication oil system, leading to the failure of the rear compressor bearing and inflight engine failure.
2. The failure of the crew to maintain the approach path and adhere to single engine landing procedures.
Factors contributing to the accident:
1. Improper and insufficient crew training, inter alia complete absence of simulator training.
2. The lack of effective coordination between crewmembers.
3. The failure of the crew to start RU19A-300 (APU).
4. Adverse weather conditions.
5. Inadequate company supervision by Polish CAA, consisting in not noticing the lack.
of flight crew training and companies generally pour safety culture.
6. Inadequate company maintenance practices, leaving preexisting breather duct failure unnoticed.
Final Report:

Crash of a Britten-Norman BN-2B-26 Islander in Ruhnu Island

Date & Time: Mar 3, 2007 at 1608 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
D-ILFB
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Pärnu - Ruhnu Island
MSN:
2271
YOM:
1994
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
16079
Aircraft flight hours:
2811
Aircraft flight cycles:
27857
Circumstances:
Luftverkehr Friesland Brunzema und Partner KG, registered in Germany and holding the Air Operator Certificate issued by the Federal Republic of Germany in 1983, has been operating scheduled flights between Pärnu (EEPU) and Ruhnu (EERU) since 2006. The flight, initially planned for 26th February 2007, was postponed several times due to adverse meteorological conditions, causing problems with provision supply on the island. On Friday, 3rd March, pilot checked the weather at 13:00 and at 14:00. Based on the received information the pilot decided to depart for Ruhnu at 14:00. At 14:08, the aircraft took off from Pärnu airport to make a scheduled VFR flight to the island of Ruhnu. Flight was carried out in the uncontrolled airspace. Pilot, two passengers and 520 kg of cargo were on board the aircraft. According to the weather briefing received by the pilot via telephone from Kuressaare, at 14:00 the cloud height in Kuressaare (EEKE, 36 Nm northwest of Ruhnu) was 600 ft. and 180 m (approximately 540 ft.) in Ruhnu. During the uneventful flight on the altitude 1500 ft., the coast and the ice border were clearly visible. The aircraft stayed clear from the clouds and no signs of icing were noticed by persons on board. Approaching the island from the northeast it was intended by the pilot to use RWY 32 for landing. The pilot decided to fly low from east to west across the runway to check the windsock and runway condition. While approaching the island, the pilot descended at the rate of 150 ft/min with low power settings and flaps extended by 1 notch. During descent the horizontal and vertical visibility deteriorated and the flight was continued in IMC2 . The descent was continued in clouds; therefore the pilot had no visual contact with the ground and horizon. The aircraft broke off the clouds over the coast on a very low altitude (100-120 ft. by pilot’s statement). Trying to maintain safe altitude and speed pilot added power, at the same time stall warning signal activated and seconds later the lower part of aircraft’s fuselage touched the treetops and collided with the terrain at 14:36. The engines continued producing power until collision with trees which after those were set to the idle by pilot. The passengers and pilot escaped the aircraft without assistance and with no injuries. The accident site is situated 0.24 Nm northeast off the runway 32 threshold. Ground surface is uneven and forested with young pinewoods.
Probable cause:
The investigation established the following causes of the accident:
1. The pilot could not maintain safe flight altitude when approaching Ruhnu aerodrome.
2. The pilot continued the descent in spite of IMC.
Contributing factors to the accident:
The investigation established the following factors contributing to the accident:
1. High motivation to perform the flight.
2. Inadequate weather information from ground services of Ruhnu aerodrome.
3. Inadequate aeronautical oversight in the destination airport.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-46-500TP Malibu Meridian in Tartu

Date & Time: Nov 24, 2006 at 1705 LT
Operator:
Registration:
OE-KDM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Tartu - Dresden
MSN:
46-97111
YOM:
2001
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The single engine aircraft departed Tartu-Ülenurme Airport on a private flight to Dresden, carrying two passengers and one pilot. Shortly after takeoff, while climbing to a height of about 300-500 metres, the aircraft entered an uncontrolled descent and crashed in a field located about 500 metres past the runway end. All three occupants were seriously injured and rescued an hour later. The aircraft was destroyed.
Probable cause:
The following findings were identified:
- Pilot’s inability to maintain necessary altitude and terrain clearance due to the spatial disorientation type 1 (unrecognized).
- Dark terrain, the absence of visual horizon and ambient light, the long duty time of the pilot and unfamiliarity with the airport can be considered as contributing factors to the accident.

Crash of a PZL-Mielec AN-28PD in Tallinn: 2 killed

Date & Time: Feb 10, 2003 at 1942 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ES-NOY
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Tallinn - Helsinki
MSN:
1AJ006-04
YOM:
1989
Flight number:
ENI827
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
10856
Captain / Total hours on type:
510.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
2827
Copilot / Total hours on type:
475
Aircraft flight hours:
1428
Aircraft flight cycles:
2141
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft departed Tallinn-Ülemiste Airport on a mail flight to Helsinki, carrying three crew members (two pilots and one mechanic) and a load consisting of 514 kilos of mail. Four seconds after lift off from runway 08, while climbing to a height of 12 metres and at a speed of 170 km/h, the left engine suffered vibrations. The power lever for the left engine was brought back to idle then in a full forward position. Nevertheless, the aircraft lost height, nosed down and crashed in a wooded area located one km past the runway end. Both pilots were killed and the mechanic was seriously injured.
Probable cause:
It was determined that the right engine failed during initial climb following the rupture of a turbine ball bearing due to poor lubrication.
Final Report:

Crash of a PZL-Mielec AN-28 in Kärdla: 2 killed

Date & Time: Nov 23, 2001 at 1835 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ES-NOV
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Tallinn - Kärdla
MSN:
1AJ003-03
YOM:
1986
Flight number:
ENI1007
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
14
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
9840
Captain / Total hours on type:
192.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
472
Copilot / Total hours on type:
106
Aircraft flight hours:
1690
Circumstances:
En route from Tallinn to Kärdla, at an altitude of 6,000 feet, the crew obtained the last weather bulletin for Kärdla Airport. The actual conditions were as follow: wind 020° at 24 knots, visibility 8,000 metres, snow, overcast 1,200 feet, broken 600 feet, temperature 0°, dewpoint 0°, QNH 1001, braking action is good, runway in use 32. One minute later, the crew was cleared to descend to 1,400 feet and reported this altitude at a distance of 11 km from the airport. The airplane continued on a heading of 240° towards the OZ NDB beacon, which was the Final Approach Fix (FAF) located about 4 km from the runway threshold. The crew continued the descent and initiated a slow turn towards the runway some 2,5 km short of the FAF. The aircraft descended into trees some 1,500 metres short of runway threshold and crashed in a wooded area. Two passengers were killed and 15 other occupants were injured, some seriously. The aircraft was totally destroyed.
Probable cause:
The accident was the consequence of an incorrect assessment of the situation by the commander of the aircraft during the approach, which resulted in errors in the piloting techniques, expressed in:
- Transition from intense icing conditions to active descent with a transition from the originally planned instrument approach to a visual approach;
- Failure to take into account the possibility of complex meteorological conditions in preparation for the approach and during the approach - the crew did not consider the possibility of going around or returning to the point of departure;
- Maintaining an unjustified low airspeed and high vertical descent speed during an approach with poor altitude control;
Associated factors were:
- Difficult weather conditions due to severe icing conditions;
- Reassessment by the aircraft commander of his knowledge and experience in controlling the An-28 aircraft in adverse weather conditions;
- Failure to comply with the requirements of the Airplane Flight Manual of the An-28 aircraft for the operation of aircraft systems and crew resource management;
- Failure to comply with the Airplane Flight Manual in terms of timely termination of the approach and transition to climb;
- The copilot, taking into account the large flying experience of the aircraft commander and overestimating his flight and navigation skills, behaved passively and did not provide him with adequate assistance in difficult conditions during the approach;
- Transition from an instrument approach to a visual approach without ATC clearance;
- The lack of 32 visual assessment of the angle of the descent trajectory (PAPI system) on the runway.
Final Report:

Crash of an Ilyushin II-14FK off Saaremaa Island

Date & Time: Sep 16, 1984
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
CCCP-91611
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Rzhevka - Rzhevka
MSN:
1480 019 44
YOM:
1958
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Aircraft flight hours:
19341
Aircraft flight cycles:
5904
Circumstances:
The crew departed Rzhevka Airport on a mission consisting of temperature reading of the Baltic Sea. While cruising at an altitude of 300 meters, the right engine lost power (possibly due to icing). The aircraft lost speed and height, and the captain decided to ditch the aircraft in the Irben Strait south of the Saaremaa island (Estonia). The aircraft sank after 12 minutes. All 6 crew and 4 passengers were rescued by a patrol boat.
Probable cause:
Engine failure, maybe due to icing.

Crash of an Antonov AN-24 at Tapa AFB: 21 killed

Date & Time: Apr 19, 1977
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Pärnu - Tapa
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
15
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
21
Circumstances:
The airplane was completing a flight from Pärnu to Tapa AFB, carrying six crew members and 15 Sukhoi SU-9 pilots. On final approach, the crew encountered poor visibility due to snow showers and failed to realize his altitude was too low when a wing struck the chimney of a spirit factory. Out of control, the airplane crashed in flames in a field located less than 3 km from runway threshold, in Moe. The aircraft was destroyed and all 21 occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Poor planned approach on part of the flying crew.

Crash of an Avia 14P in Jõhvi: 1 killed

Date & Time: Sep 5, 1958 at 1252 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
CCCP-L2048
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Leningrad – Tallinn
MSN:
058 705 101
YOM:
30
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
11
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Aircraft flight hours:
1195
Circumstances:
While cruising on a flight from Leningrad to Tallinn, a passenger gave a message to the stewardess to be transmitted to the flying crew. The claims remains unclear and unable to enter the cockpit, the hijacker set on an artisanal bomb and a fire erupted in the cabin. From an altitude of 900 meters, the crew started a steep descent and completed an emergency landing at Jõhvi Airport. All crew members and passengers were able to evacuate the cabin and were uninjured while the hijacker was killed when the airplane was destroyed by fire.
Probable cause:
Hijacked and set on fire.