Crash of a Beechcraft 200 Super King Air in Oscoda: 1 killed

Date & Time: Sep 25, 2018 at 0613 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N241CK
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Detroit - Oscoda
MSN:
BB-272
YOM:
1977
Flight number:
K985
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
3806
Captain / Total hours on type:
201.00
Aircraft flight hours:
13933
Circumstances:
The aircraft collided with trees and terrain while on an instrument approach to Oscoda-Wurtsmith Airport (OSC), Oscoda, Michigan. The airline transport pilot was fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed by impact forces and a post-impact fire. The airplane was registered to Kalitta Equipment LLC, and was operated by Kalitta Charters as a Title14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 positioning flight. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site at the time of the accident, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed for the flight which originated from Willow Run Airport (YIP), Ypsilanti, Michigan, about 0513. According to Kalitta personnel, the pilot was flying to OSC to pick up passengers and subsequently fly them to Memphis, Tennessee. The airplane departed YIP about 0513 and climbed to a cruise altitude of about 13,500 ft. The airplane en route airspeed was about 250 knots. At 0537, when the airplane was about 85 miles south of OSC, it began its initial descent. At 0548, the airplane was vectored to the right to intercept the final approach course and was cleared for the VOR runway 6 approach at OSC. The last radar return was at 0550 and indicated that the airplane was at an altitude of 2,200 ft and 8.1 miles from the runway threshold. It impacted terrain 4.6 miles past this point, about 3.5 miles from the runway threshold. According to the VOR runway 6 approach procedure, an altitude of 2,500 ft (or higher) is flown during the procedure turn. If the OSC altimeter setting is used, descent is made to 1,660 feet to Dogsy intersection, and then to 1,100 feet, the minimum descent altitude (MDA) to Au Sable (ASP) intersection. When the airplane failed to arrive at the airport as scheduled, Kalitta officials notified the Federal Aviation Administration. The wreckage was subsequently located about 1030.

Crash of a McDonnell Douglas MD-83 in Detroit

Date & Time: Mar 8, 2017 at 1452 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N786TW
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Detroit - Washington DC
MSN:
53123/1987
YOM:
1992
Flight number:
7Z9363
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
110
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
15518
Captain / Total hours on type:
8495.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
9660
Copilot / Total hours on type:
2462
Aircraft flight hours:
41008
Aircraft flight cycles:
39472
Circumstances:
A McDonnell Douglas MD-83, registration N786TW, suffered a runway excursion following an aborted takeoff from runway 23L at Detroit-Willow Run Airport, Michigan, USA. The aircraft had been chartered by the University of Michigan Basketball team for a flight to a game in Washington, DC. The flight crew prepared for take-off and calculated V-speeds (V1, VR, V2) using "Normal Thrust Takeoff", a 10 kts headwind, and a take-off weight of 146,600 lbs. The V-speeds for this configuration were 139 kts, 142 kts, and 150 kts, respectively. However, the flight crew chose to increase VR to 150 kts to allow for more control during take-off in the presence of windshear. During takeoff roll, at 14:51:56 (about 3,000 ft down the runway) and about 138 kts of airspeed, the control column was pulled back slightly from a non-dimensional value of -7 to -5.52. The airplane’s left elevator followed the control input and moved from a position of -15° trailing edge down to -13° trailing edge down. The right elevator did not change and stayed at approximately -16° trailing edge down. At 14:52:01 a large control column input was made (151 kts and 4100 ft down the runway) to a non-dimensional 18.5 and the left elevator moves to a position near 15° trailing edge up. After 14:52:05 the right elevator moves to -13° trailing edge down, but no more. The airplane does not respond in pitch and does not rotate. The captain decided to abort the takeoff. The maximum ground speed was 163 kts (173 kts airspeed) and the airplane began to decelerate as soon as the brakes were applied at 14:52:08. Spoilers were deployed at 14:52:10 and thrust reversers were deployed between 14:52:13 and 14:52:15. The aircraft could not be stopped on the runway. The airplane’s ground speed was 100 kts when it left the paved surface. The aircraft overran the end of the runway, damaged approach lights, went through the perimeter fence and crossed Tyler Road. It came to rest on grassy terrain, 345 meters past the end of the runway, with the rear fuselage across a ditch. The nose landing gear had collapsed. Runway 23L is a 7543 ft long runway.
Probable cause:
The NTSB determines that the probable cause of this accident was the jammed condition of the airplane’s right elevator, which resulted from exposure to localized, dynamic wind while the airplane was parked and rendered the airplane unable to rotate during takeoff. Contributing to the accident were (1) the effect of a large structure on the gusting surface wind at the airplane’s parked location, which led to turbulent gust loads on the right elevator sufficient to jam it, even though the horizontal surface wind speed was below the certification design limit and maintenance inspection criteria for the airplane, and (2) the lack of a means to enable the flight crew to detect a jammed elevator during preflight checks for the Boeing MD-83 airplane. Contributing to the survivability of the accident was the captain’s timely and appropriate decision to reject the takeoff, the check airman’s disciplined adherence to standard operating procedures after the captain called for the rejected takeoff, and the dimensionally compliant runway safety area where the overrun occurred.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 550 Citation II in Milwaukee: 6 killed

Date & Time: Jun 4, 2007 at 1600 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N550BP
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Milwaukee - Detroit
MSN:
550-0246
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Captain / Total flying hours:
14000
Aircraft flight hours:
4402
Circumstances:
On June 4, 2007, about 1600 central daylight time, a Cessna Citation 550, N550BP, impacted Lake Michigan shortly after departure from General Mitchell International Airport, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (MKE). The two pilots and four passengers were killed, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was being operated by Marlin Air under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 and departed MKE about 1557 with an intended destination of Willow Run Airport, near Ypsilanti, Michigan. At the time of the accident flight, marginal visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the surface, and instrument meteorological
conditions prevailed aloft; the flight operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan.
Probable cause:
The pilots’ mismanagement of an abnormal flight control situation through improper actions, including failing to control airspeed and to prioritize control of the airplane, and lack of crew coordination. Contributing to the accident were Marlin Air’s operational safety deficiencies, including the inadequate checkrides administered by Marlin Air’s chief pilot/check airman, and the Federal Aviation Administration’s failure to detect and correct those deficiencies, which placed a pilot who inadequately emphasized safety in the position of company chief pilot and designated check airman and placed an ill-prepared pilot in the first officer’s seat.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 208B Super Cargomaster in Alma: 1 killed

Date & Time: Mar 15, 2002 at 0200 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N228PA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Minneapolis - Detroit
MSN:
208B-0049
YOM:
1988
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
3800
Captain / Total hours on type:
1500.00
Aircraft flight hours:
9942
Circumstances:
The pilot departed with the airplane contaminated with ice, into known severe icing conditions, and was unable to maintain altitude, subsequently impacting trees and terrain. Witnesses reported the accident airplane arrived at the departure airport contaminated with ice. Several witnesses stated they asked the pilot if he needed the airplane deiced prior to his next departure and the pilot stated he did not need any deice service. Several witnesses said they noticed the pilot chipping-off ice from the airplane prior to his departure. While en route the pilot reported the airplane had encountered icing conditions and he was unable to maintain altitude. Several thick pieces of ice were recovered around the accident site and one of the recovered ice pieces had a semicircular shaped edge that was consistent with a leading edge of an airfoil. No pre-impact anomalies were found with the leading edge de-ice boots that were installed on both wings, vertical and horizontal stabilizers, and wing struts. Federal Aviation Regulations state that all ice contamination shall be removed prior to flight. The Cessna 208B Pilot Operating Handbook indicates that continued flight into known icing conditions must be avoided.
Probable cause:
The pilot not removing the ice contamination from the airplane prior to departure and the pilot intentionally flying into known severe icing conditions, resulting in the aircraft not being able to maintain altitude/clearance from the terrain. Factors to the accident included the icing conditions and the trees encountered during the forced landing.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 500 Citation I in Sault Sainte Marie

Date & Time: Feb 26, 2001 at 1030 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N234UM
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Detroit – Sault Sainte Marie
MSN:
500-0105
YOM:
1973
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2770
Captain / Total hours on type:
1410.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
3142
Copilot / Total hours on type:
300
Aircraft flight hours:
8329
Circumstances:
The captain said that he flew the VOR approach to runway 32. At 2,500 feet, the captain said that they were out of the clouds and initiated a visual straight-in approach. After aligning the airplane with the runway, the captain said he noticed that there was contamination on the runway, "maybe compacted snow or maybe ice with fresh snow over it." The captain briefed that they would perform a go-around if by midfield they were not decelerating adequately. The captain said that they touched down within the first third of the runway. Close to midfield the airplane fishtailed. Past midfield, the captain called a go-around. The first officer said that the captain added power and he retracted the airbrakes. The first officer exclaimed, "There is not enough runway! I braced myself as the aircraft went into the snow." The first officer said that at about 2 miles out from the runway, the unicom called and said that braking action was nil. A Notice to Airman, in effect at the time of the accident for the airport stated, "icy runway, nil braking."
Probable cause:
The pilot exceeding the available runway distance during landing and the pilot's delay in executing a go-around. Factors relating to the accident were, the pilots improper in-flight planning/decision, the pilot disregarding the NOTAMS for the airport, the pilot failing to properly consider the warning given by the Unicom operator regarding the icy runway and nil braking action, the icy runway, and the drop-off/descending embankment.
Final Report:

Crash of a Dassault Falcon 20E in Peterborough

Date & Time: Jun 13, 2000 at 2250 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N184GA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Louisville – Marion – Detroit – Peterborough
MSN:
266
YOM:
1972
Flight number:
GAE184
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
11800
Captain / Total hours on type:
9400.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
2300
Copilot / Total hours on type:
150
Aircraft flight hours:
15798
Circumstances:
The Dassault-Breguet Falcon 20E aircraft was on an unscheduled charter cargo flight from Detroit Willow Run, Michigan, USA, to Peterborough, Ontario. The flight was being conducted at night and under instrument flight rules in instrument meteorological conditions. Nearing the destination, the flight crew received a clearance to conduct a non-directional beacon runway 09 approach at Peterborough Airport. The flight crew did not acquire the runway environment during this approach and conducted a missed approach procedure. They obtained another clearance for the same approach from Toronto Area Control Centre. During this approach, the flight crew acquired the runway environment and manoeuvred the aircraft for landing on runway 09. The aircraft touched down near the runway midpoint, and the captain, who was the pilot flying, elected to abort the landing. The captain then conducted a left visual circuit to attempt another landing. As the aircraft was turning onto the final leg, the approach became unstabilized, and the flight crew elected to overshoot; however, the aircraft pitched nose-down, banked left, and struck terrain. As it travelled 400 feet through a ploughed farm field, the aircraft struck a tree line and came to rest about 2000 feet before the threshold of runway 09, facing the opposite direction. The aircraft was substantially damaged. No serious injuries occurred.
Probable cause:
Findings as to Causes and Contributing Factors:
1. The captain's attempt to continue the landing during the second approach was contrary to company standard operating procedures and Federal Aviation Regulations, in that the approach was unstable and the aircraft was not in a position to land safely.
2. Following the aborted landing, the flight crew proceeded to conduct a circling approach to runway 09, rather than the missed approach procedure as briefed.
3. The pilot lost situational awareness during the overshoot after the third failed attempt to land, likely when he was subjected to somatogravic illusion.
4. Breakdown in crew coordination after the aborted landing, lack of planning and briefing for the subsequent approach, operating in a dark, instrument meteorological conditions environment with limited visual cues, and inadequate monitoring of flight instruments contributed to the loss of situational awareness.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft C-45G Expeditor in Detroit: 1 killed

Date & Time: Mar 11, 1999 at 0051 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N234L
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Detroit - Detroit
MSN:
AF-447
YOM:
1958
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
1305
Aircraft flight hours:
7073
Circumstances:
The aircraft declared an emergency following departure from runway 03R at Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport, Romulus, Michigan. The aircraft was resting on a magnetic heading of 055 degrees located approximately 3,400 feet from and 1,900 feet to the left of the departure end and centerline of runway 03R at DTW. Inspection of the forward section of the fuselage door and surrounding fuselage, a circular impression with no exposure of the underlying metal was noted approximately 2 feet 6-1/2 inches from the door hinge line. The door was opened to a point nearly flush with the aircraft's fuselage. The door handle was found to match the circular impression in position and shape. There was no tearing or fracturing of the forward fuselage door pin tips or its door pin holes. Inspection of the door's latching mechanism revealed a brown colored nail connecting the handle and vertical latches. Both engine supercharger turbine wheels displayed scoring and deformation of the impeller blades in the plane of rotation. Aileron, elevator and rudder flight control continuity was established. The elevator trim was in the neutral position. The trailing edge flaps were in the retracted positions. Both engine oil screens showed no evidence of metal contamination.
Probable cause:
The aircraft control not maintained and the inadvertent stall by the pilot while maneuvering to the landing area. The open door was a contributing factor.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft E18S in Detroit: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jun 8, 1993 at 0502 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N51FG
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Detroit - Louisville
MSN:
BA-324
YOM:
1957
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
1700
Captain / Total hours on type:
27.00
Aircraft flight hours:
11916
Circumstances:
The pilot was conducting his initial revenue and solo flight for this company, in this type of airplane. The weather for takeoff included fog and low ceilings. The airplane was equipped with a primary (left) attitude indicator which was electrically operated via an independent switch. This aircraft was the only such airplane operated by this company, with an independent switch configuration for the primary attitude indicator. The airplane collided with the terrain on the airport, just after takeoff. Subsequent examination revealed no anomalies with the engines or airframe. The primary attitude indicator was located. On examination it was found to have a malfunctioning on/off flag which gave the indication of being operative regardless of power to the unit. No rotational damage was noted within the gyro housing. The pilot, sole on board, was killed.
Probable cause:
The pilot-in-command's inadequate preflight preparation, false indication (on/off) of attitude indicator, and attitude indicator switched off. Factors were fog, low ceiling, the pilot-in-command's improper use of the attitude indicator, and his lack of total experience in the type of airplane.
Final Report:

Crash of a Learjet 23 in Ansonia: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jan 18, 1990 at 0551 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N331DP
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Detroit - Louisville
MSN:
23-067
YOM:
1965
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
20000
Aircraft flight hours:
5600
Circumstances:
At 0515 est, the flight was cleared for takeoff on a flight from Ypsilanti, MI to Louisville, KY. About 17 minutes later, the flight crew began to display indications of a deterioration of their ability to control the aircraft. At 1st, they deviated from instruments to hold west of the Findlay VOR at FL220. As the flight continued and was cleared to FL270, the crew displayed confusion about magnetic headings and basic instruments. At 1048 est, the aircraft deviated from the en route heading and the wrong heading was read back after a heading correction was given. Also, the aircraft continued climbing (to FL291), then radar and radio contact were lost at 0551 est. The controller noted the pilot's speech was slurred and some portions of the conversation were unintelligible. Subsequently, the aircraft crashed in a steep dive. No preimpact part failure was verified, though impact forces and post-crash fire resulted in extensive damage of the aircraft. The aircraft was equipped with oxygen and pressurization system. No audible warning was noted on ATC recordings to indicate the cabin altitude had exceeded 10,000 feet, though the aircraft was equipped with such a device. Both pilots were killed.
Probable cause:
The flight crew became incapacitated for undetermined reasons and lost control of the airplane.
Final Report: