Crash of a Beechcraft B90 King Air in Chattanooga

Date & Time: Sep 19, 2007 at 2015 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N10TM
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Birmingham - Chattanooga
MSN:
LJ-476
YOM:
1970
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
11150
Captain / Total hours on type:
371.00
Aircraft flight hours:
9638
Circumstances:
Prior to departing, the pilot looked at the fuel quantity indicators, and believed that approximately 3 hours of fuel was available for the estimated 1 hour 20 minute flight. Upon reaching the cruise portion of the flight, the pilot realized that an insufficient quantity of fuel remained in order to complete the planned flight, and he elected to divert to a closer airport. While on final approach to the diversionary airport, both engines lost power, and the pilot made a forced landing to a parking lot. When asked about the performance and handling of the airplane during the flight, the pilot stated, "the airplane performed the way it was suppose to when it ran out of fuel."
Probable cause:
The pilot's inadequate preflight planning, which resulted in fuel exhaustion during the landing approach.
Final Report:

Crash of a Rockwell CT-39N Sabreliner in Villanow: 4 killed

Date & Time: Jan 10, 2006 at 1120 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
165524
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Chattanooga - Pensacola
MSN:
282-060
YOM:
1966
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
The crew departed Chattanooga-Lovell Field on a training flight to Pensacola-Forrest Sherman Field NAS, Florida. About 20 minutes into the flight, while cruising at low altitude, the aircraft contacted a tree and crashed a mile further on the slope of Mt Johns, near Villanow, Georgia. All four occupants were killed.

Crash of a Mitsubishi MU-2B-20 Marquise in Ames

Date & Time: Jan 24, 1984 at 1055 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N123AX
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Chattanooga - Ames
MSN:
220
YOM:
1972
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
10785
Captain / Total hours on type:
327.00
Circumstances:
The aircraft landed in a crosswind on a snow and ice covered runway. During landing, directional control was lost and the aircraft collided with a snowbank. The pilot stated he attempted to use propeller reversing for braking and the aircraft started to slide to the left. All four occupants escaped uninjured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: loss of control - on ground/water
Phase of operation: landing - roll
Findings
1. (f) terrain condition - icy
2. (c) wrong runway - selected - pilot in command
3. (f) terrain condition - snow covered
4. (c) airspeed - improper - pilot in command
5. (f) weather condition - crosswind
6. (c) directional control - not maintained - pilot in command
7. (c) ground loop/swerve - not corrected - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #2: on ground/water encounter with terrain/water
Phase of operation: landing - roll
Findings
8. (f) terrain condition - snowbank
9. Landing gear - overload
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-61 Aerostar (Ted Smith 601P) near Summerville: 1 killed

Date & Time: Sep 2, 1980 at 1954 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N90463
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Chattanooga – Birmingham
MSN:
61P-0260-050
YOM:
1976
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
1362
Captain / Total hours on type:
56.00
Circumstances:
En route from Chattanooga to Birmingham, while in cruising altitude, the twin engine entered an uncontrolled descent and crashed in an open field. The pilot, sole on board, was killed.
Probable cause:
The exact cause of the loss of control could not be determined.
Final Report:

Crash of a Mitsubishi MU-2B-20 Marquise in Nashville: 5 killed

Date & Time: Nov 1, 1979 at 2141 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N873Q
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Chattanooga - Nashville
MSN:
160
YOM:
1969
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
1498
Captain / Total hours on type:
661.00
Circumstances:
On final approach to Nashville-Metropolitan Airport by night, the crew failed to realize his altitude was too low. The twin engine airplane struck power cables and crashed short of runway. All five occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Collision with power cables on final approach after the copilot misjudged distance and altitude. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Inadequate supervision of flight,
- Operational supervisory personnel: deficiency, company maintained equipment, services, regulation,
- Pilot fatigue,
- Fog,
- Crew scheduled for 18-20 hours, crew time routinely,
- Autopilot found on,
- Trim 10° nose down.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft A100 King Air in Muscle Shoals

Date & Time: Jun 22, 1978 at 0712 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N941K
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Chattanooga - Muscle Shoals
MSN:
B-111
YOM:
1972
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
20834
Captain / Total hours on type:
24.00
Circumstances:
On final approach to Muscle Shoals Airport, the airplane lost speed, stalled and crashed short of runway. All six occupants were seriously injured and the aircraft was destroyed.
Probable cause:
Stall on final approach after the pilot-in-command failed to maintain flying speed. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Improper operation of powerplant and powerplant controls,
- Lack of familiarity with aircraft,
- Fog,
- Poor crew coordination,
- Visibility one mile or less,
- The pilot-in-command reduced props instead of throttles.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft D18S in Tullahoma

Date & Time: Feb 14, 1974 at 0235 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N313A
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Nashville - Chattanooga
MSN:
A-257
YOM:
1946
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
1244
Captain / Total hours on type:
385.00
Circumstances:
While on a night approach to Tullahoma Airport, the left engine caught fire. The crew was able to extinguish the fire and the propeller was feathered. Unfortunately, the pilot missed the runway and the captain decided to initiate a go-around manoeuvre when the airplane stalled and crashed. Both occupants were injured and the aircraft was destroyed.
Probable cause:
Fire on left engine after a fuel line failed on approach. The following factors were reported:
- Loose parts,
- Failed to maintain flying speed,
- Fire in engine,
- Low ceiling,
- Obstructions to vision,
- Suspected or known aircraft damage,
- Loose fuel line.
Final Report:

Crash of a Douglas DC-9-32 in Chattanooga

Date & Time: Nov 27, 1973 at 1851 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N3323L
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Atlanta - Chattanooga
MSN:
47032/204
YOM:
1967
Flight number:
DL516
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
74
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
15949
Captain / Total hours on type:
3218.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
6301
Copilot / Total hours on type:
4000
Aircraft flight hours:
18233
Circumstances:
Following an uneventful flight from Atlanta, the crew started the approach to Chattanooga Airport in poor weather conditions with limited visibility due to heavy rain falls. On short final, the crew failed to realize his altitude was insufficient when the airplane struck approach light located 1,600 feet short of runway 20 threshold. The airplane then struck the ground, lost its left wing and skidded for another 1,200 feet before coming to rest 250 feet to the left of the runway centerline. All 79 occupants evacuated safely and only seven passengers were slightly injured.
Probable cause:
The pilot did not recognize the need to correct an excessive rate of descent after the aircraft had passed decision height. This occurred despite two verbal reports of increasing sink rate by the first officer. The captain disregarded the reports by the first officer, possibly because of the influence of a visual illusion caused by the refraction of light through the heavy rain on the windshield. The excessive rate of descent was initiated by a wind shear condition which extended in the lower levels of the approach path and a glide slope that tended toward the lower signal limit.
Final Report:

Crash of a Curtiss C-46F-1-CU Commando in Chattanooga

Date & Time: Jan 22, 1955
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N1242N
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Norfolk – Knoxville – Oklahoma City
MSN:
22406
YOM:
1945
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew left Norfolk NAS on a cargo flight to Oklahoma City with an intermediate stop at Knoxville, carrying a load of 12,000 pounds of various goods on behalf of the US Army. As the weather conditions worsened at Knoxville, the crew was diverted to Chattanooga. With a ceiling at 900 feet, the crew continued the approach at an insufficient altitude when the airplane hit trees, lost its left wing and crashed 2,660 feet short of runway. The aircraft was destroyed and both crew members were seriously injured.
Probable cause:
The crew decided to continue the approach below the glide without any visual contact with the ground.

Crash of a Douglas C-47A-25-DK in Atlanta

Date & Time: Jun 15, 1954 at 1745 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N51359
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Atlanta – Chattanooga – Knoxville – Cincinnati – Chicago
MSN:
13759
YOM:
1944
Flight number:
DL134X
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
6014
Captain / Total hours on type:
4575.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
6803
Copilot / Total hours on type:
6800
Aircraft flight hours:
18827
Circumstances:
As the aircraft became airborne the landing gear was retracted. Light rain was encountered at this time. When the air-craft had climbed to 200 to 250 feet, power was reduced to 35 inches of manifold pressure and a shallow right turn was begun. Before a reduction in r.p.m. was made the aircraft began to settle and the airspeed was observed to decrease rapidly from above 105 to 80 knots. The nose was immediately lowered to level flight, & the turn stopped, and full power applied. When this was done, the air-speed returned to about 100 knots and the settling appeared to lessen considerably. The increased airspeed with the attendant better flying characteristics was monetary, however, as the airspeed abruptly dropped to 60 knots and the airplane again began to settle. As the aircraft continued to settle and it became obvious that it was going to strike the ground, the first officer attempted to raise tile nose. Upon feeling the aircraft strike the ground, both throttles were closed. The aircraft then skidded to a stop in a wooded area approximately 600 feet north-west of the far end of runway 21. The airplane was destroyed and both pilots were injured.
Probable cause:
The Board determines that the probable cause of this accident was a rapid loss of airspeed immediately following takeoff caused by unexpected, strong gusts or divergent winds accompanying a local rain shower. The following findings were reported:
- At the time of takeoff a large thunderstorm was 8 to 10 miles south of the airport and a local rain shower was approaching the southeast end of runway,
- The aircraft took off from runway 21 and climbed to approximately 200 to 250 feet,
- A portion of the rain shower was encountered which contained strong gusts,
- While in the rain shower the aircraft lost airspeed and settled to the ground.
Final Report: