Crash of a Beechcraft A65 Queen Air in Tuguegarao

Date & Time: Nov 29, 2010 at 1330 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
RP-C1111
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Basco-Tuguegarao
MSN:
LC-270
YOM:
1968
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
11
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
In flight, crew encountered technical problems and elected to divert for an emergency landing. Aircraft stalled and crashed in a river. All thirteen occupants, among them two children, were safely evacuated. Aircraft damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Beechcraft A65 Queen Air off San Carlos: 3 killed

Date & Time: Sep 2, 2010 at 1151 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N832B
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
San Carlos - Santa Clara
MSN:
LC-112
YOM:
1961
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
15
Captain / Total flying hours:
18000
Captain / Total hours on type:
6000.00
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff for a repositioning flight for the airplane’s upcoming annual inspection, numerous witnesses, including the two air traffic controllers, reported observing the airplane climbing out normally until it was about 1/2 mile beyond the runway. The witnesses stated that the airplane then underwent a short series of attitude excursions, rolled right, and descended steeply into a lagoon. All radio communications between the airplane and the air traffic controllers were normal. Ground-based radar tracking data indicated that the airplane's climb to about 500 feet was normal and that it was airborne for about 40 seconds. Postaccident examination of the airframe, systems, and engines did not reveal any mechanical failures that would have precluded continued normal operation. Damage to both engines’ propeller blades suggested low or moderate power at the time of impact; however, the right propeller blades exhibited less damage than the left. The propeller damage, witness-observed airplane dynamics, and the airplane’s trajectory were consistent with a loss of power in the right engine and a subsequent loss of control due to airspeed decay below the minimum control speed (referred to as VMC). Although required by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)-approved Airplane Flight Manual, no evidence of a cockpit placard to designate the single engine operating speeds, including VMC, was found in the wreckage. The underlying reason for the loss of power in the right engine could not be determined. The airplane's certification basis (Civil Air Regulation [CAR] 3) did not require either a red radial line denoting VMC or a blue radial line denoting the single engine climb speed (VYSE) on the airspeed indicators; no such markings were observed on the airspeed indicators in the wreckage. Those markings were only mandated for airplanes certificated under Federal Aviation Regulation Part 23, which became effective about 3 years after the accident airplane was manufactured. Neither the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) nor the airplane manufacturer mandated or recommended such VMC or VYSE markings on the airspeed indicators of the accident airplane make and model. In addition, a cursory search did not reveal any such retroactive guidance for any twin-engine airplane models certificated under CAR 3. Follow-up communication from the FAA Small Airplane Directorate stated that the FAA has "not discussed this as a possible retroactive action... Our take from the accident studies is that because of the accident record with light/reciprocating engine twins, the insurance industry has restricted them to a select group of pilot/owners…" Toxicology testing revealed evidence consistent with previous use of marijuana by the pilot; however, it was not possible to determine when that usage occurred or whether the pilot might have been impaired by its use during the accident flight.
Probable cause:
A loss of power in the right engine for undetermined reasons and the pilot’s subsequent failure to maintain adequate airspeed, which resulted in a loss of control. Contributing to the loss of control was the regulatory certification basis of the airplane that does not require airspeed indicator markings that are critical to maintaining airplane control with one engine inoperative.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft Queen Air 65 in Campbellsville

Date & Time: Jun 30, 1996 at 1240 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N3870C
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
LC-212
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3500
Captain / Total hours on type:
100.00
Aircraft flight hours:
2549

Crash of a Beechcraft 65 Queen Air in West Point: 12 killed

Date & Time: Sep 10, 1995 at 1840 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N945PA
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
West Point - West Point
MSN:
LC-217
YOM:
1968
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
10
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
12
Captain / Total flying hours:
2980
Captain / Total hours on type:
462.00
Aircraft flight hours:
1530

Crash of a Beechcraft 65 Queen Air near Mauban: 5 killed

Date & Time: Oct 27, 1993
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
RP-C999
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Manila - Virac
MSN:
LC-156
YOM:
1963
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
En route from Manila to Virac, the twin engine aircraft lost altitude then crashed on the slope of a mountain located near Mauban. All five occupants were killed. It is believed that the pilot encountered engine problems for unknown reasons.

Crash of a Beechcraft 65 Queen Air near Orlando: 5 killed

Date & Time: Dec 19, 1992 at 0739 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N555GC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Sanford – Fort Lauderdale
MSN:
LC-164
YOM:
1965
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
8269
Captain / Total hours on type:
40.00
Aircraft flight hours:
3700
Circumstances:
Pilot reported level at 6,000 feet; no further transmissions were received. Radar data shows that after 5 minutes at cruise flight ground speed began to slow, and as speed reached 85 knots (VMC is 83 knots) aircraft made a rapid turn to the left and the speed dropped to 74 knots. Radar contact was then lost. Witnesses reported hearing and seeing aircraft with an engine sputtering and quitting, at which time no engine noise was audible. Engine would then restart, and at one point aircraft was observed initiating a climb after engine start. Engine restarted and obtained near full power, and a short time later sound of impact was heard. The left engine fuel servo was found contaminated with corrosion and dirt, and would not allow fuel flow to the engine. The fuel strainer for this engine was installed backwards allowing unfiltered fuel to enter the engine. The left propeller was not feathered and had no signs of rotation under power. Right engine fuel servo also contained corrosion and contamination. The aircraft did not have a current annual inspection. All five occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to feather the propeller to maintain altitude following a loss of power of the left engine. The power loss was due to an improperly maintained fuel system. In addition, the right engine lost power for an undetermined reason(s).
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft B65 Queen Air near Madison: 2 killed

Date & Time: May 16, 1992 at 1400 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N30RR
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Allentown - Charlottesville
MSN:
LC-186
YOM:
1965
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
6003
Circumstances:
The instrument rated pilot was en route to his granddaughter's graduation exercises scheduled for the following day. He had received two preflight weather briefings from flight service and he was advised that marginal VFR conditions existed en route, and instrument meteorological conditions at his destination, and that VFRflight was not recommended. A witness who was below the mountain said he heard a low flying aircraft overhead. He stated that he caught a glimpse of the airplane and said it was 'well below the crest of the mountain' heading south. The weather as reported by the witness was about 200 overcast and visibility below 1 mile in fog. He also mentioned that the clouds had obscured the mountain. Shortly thereafter, he heard what was later determined to be the collision. Search personnel located the burning wreckage on top of Mitchells mountain 50 miles north of Charlottesville. Both occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
The pilot initiated VFR flight into known adverse weather conditions. Contributing to the accident was low ceiling, high terrain, and low altitude.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft 65 Queen Air in Meridian

Date & Time: Jul 17, 1991 at 1702 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N711SF
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Meridian – Tuscaloosa
MSN:
LC-139
YOM:
1962
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
943
Captain / Total hours on type:
34.00
Aircraft flight hours:
9200
Circumstances:
The pilot reported that shortly after takeoff the aircraft yawed to the right, left then right again. The passenger in the copilot seat stated the right engine rpm gauge indication needle was fluctuating. The pilot positioned the right engine mixture control to idle cutoff and the propeller control to feather. The propeller continued to windmill. Unable to maintain altitude, the pilot attempted to land on a highway but the aircraft collided with an unmarked power line, light pole, then the ground and was destroyed by a post crash fire. The right engine was recovered and due to impact damage, the propeller and fuel servo were replaced. The engine was placed on a test stand and was started and found to operate normally. The prop governor and damaged fuel servo were tested and found to operate normally. The damaged propeller was inspected and found to be free of preimpact failure or malfunction. No determination could be made as to the reason for the reported power fluctuation from the right engine. A witness stated gear retraction was delayed after takeoff.
Probable cause:
Loss of power from the right engine due to undetermined reasons. The failure of the propeller to feather was a factor in the accident.
Final Report: