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Crash of a Beechcraft 350i Super King Air in Addison: 10 killed

Date & Time: Jun 30, 2019 at 0911 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N511EF
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Addison – Saint Petersburg
MSN:
FL-1091
YOM:
2017
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
10
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from runway 15/33 at Addison Airport, while in initial climb, the twin engine airplane went out of control and crashed in flames onto a hangar located by the airport. The aircraft was totally destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire and all 10 occupants were killed.

Crash of a Beechcraft B60 Duke near Ferris

Date & Time: Mar 1, 2018 at 1100 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N77MM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Addison – Mexia
MSN:
P-587
YOM:
1982
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
6400
Captain / Total hours on type:
2200.00
Aircraft flight hours:
2210
Circumstances:
The pilot in the multi-engine, retractable landing gear airplane reported that, during an instrument flight rules cross-country flight, about 5,000 ft above mean sea level, the left engine surged several times and he performed an emergency engine shutdown. Shortly afterward, the right engine lost power. During the emergency descent, the airplane struck treetops, and landed hard in a field with the landing gear retracted. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings, the engine mounts, and the lower fuselage. The pilot reported that he had requested 200 gallons of fuel from his home airport fixed base operator, but they did not fuel the airplane. The pilot did not check the fuel quantity during his preflight inspection. According to the Federal Aviation Administration Airplane Flying Handbook, Chapter 2, page 2-7, pilots must always positively confirm the fuel quantity by visually inspecting the fuel level in each tank. The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.
Probable cause:
The pilot's improper preflight inspection of the fuel level, which resulted in a loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's failure to lower the landing gear before the emergency landing.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-46-350P Malibu Mirage in Waldron: 1 killed

Date & Time: Apr 4, 1999 at 1831 LT
Registration:
N497CA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Nashville – Addison
MSN:
46-36197
YOM:
1999
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
732
Captain / Total hours on type:
23.00
Aircraft flight hours:
30
Circumstances:
While in cruise flight at 24,000 feet msl, the pilot of the Piper Malibu Mirage advised Memphis Center that he had encountered icing conditions and was experiencing a fuel imbalance. The pilot requested and was cleared to deviate to the north. Subsequently, radio and radar contact were lost. A witness reported hearing the sound of the airplane's engine stop running and observed the airplane descending from the dark clouds in a nose down attitude and rotating clockwise. Residents of the area reported that the weather at the time of the accident was high ceilings with heavy rain just before and after the accident. There were thunderstorms with lightning in the area at the time of the accident. The wreckage of the airplane was scattered along an area of about four miles. The airplane was equipped with an autopilot, weather radar, and an ice protection system. The pilot had recently purchased the 1999 model airplane and had completed a Mirage initial training course. At the time of the accident the pilot had accumulated a total of 21.4 hours in the make and model of the accident aircraft. No anomalies were found with the airframe or engine that would have prevented normal operation.
Probable cause:
The pilot's encounter with adverse weather and loss of aircraft control, which resulted in exceeding the aircraft's design stress limits. Factors were the pilot's lack of total experience in the make and model of airplane, and the icing and thunderstorm weather conditions.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 402B in Roanoke

Date & Time: Nov 29, 1991 at 1720 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N69CR
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Addison - Addison
MSN:
402B-0521
YOM:
1973
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
4500
Circumstances:
During daylight flight, the airplane lost its right engine due to failed piston assembly because of engine overheating. The overheating was due to the engine air cooling baffle not being installed and the improper oil filter being installed. The airplane would not sustain flight due to the inoperative main landing gear which was locked in the down position and the propeller that could not feather due to corrosion. The pilot and his passenger were seriously injured in the landing due to the lack of seat belts. The airplane was operated with 137 known deficiencies.
Probable cause:
The operation of the airplane with known deficiencies, a missing air cooling baffle, and inadequate maintenance. Factors were the frozen propeller, inability of the pilot to feather the propeller, inoperative landing gear, the inability of the pilot to retract the landing gear, and the lack of seat belts.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft F90 King Air in Nacogdoches

Date & Time: Jan 11, 1991 at 1040 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N311DS
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Nacogdoches - Addison
MSN:
LA-41
YOM:
1980
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
6689
Captain / Total hours on type:
56.00
Aircraft flight hours:
3262
Circumstances:
The pilot reported that shortly after lifting off, the airplane began decelerating slowly. He thought the throttles had retarded; however, all of the engine instruments indicated takeoff power. Realizing that he could not return to the airport, the pilot selected a forced landing area and aimed the airplane between two trees. Investigation revealed that both props were at or near feather pitch angles at impact and being driven under power. Both engines had been changed immediately prior to the flight and both ground idle stops had been adjusted after the engine change with the left engine being slaved to the right. The system operated off of a squat switch on the right gear. Misriging of the right engine would be reflected in the left and allow oil pressure to be vented from the domes, which in turn would allow the propeller cylinder springs to drive the props toward feather as the right strut extended during takeoff. The pilot, sole on board, was seriously injured.
Probable cause:
The loss of thrust due to the propeller's feathering on liftoff as a result of improper adjustments made during an engine change. A factor was the lack of suitable terrain to which the pilot could execute a forced landing.
Final Report:

Crash of a Learjet 24B near Cuatro Ciénegas: 2 killed

Date & Time: Dec 16, 1988
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N234CM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Memphis - Addison
MSN:
24-214
YOM:
1970
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The crew departed Memphis on a flight to Addison, Texas. En route, the crew was cleared to climb to FL300 but the aircraft continued to climb without authorization until FL440. ATC tried to contact the crew without success. It was decided to dispatch a USAF Northrop T-38 Talon fighter and his pilot confirmed that the cockpit windows were covered by frost and that he was unable to contact the crew. The aircraft continued its route to the south, entered the Mexican airspace and few minutes later, after both engines failed due to fuel exhaustion, the aircraft entered a dive and crashed near Cuatro Ciénegas. The aircraft disintegrated on impact and both pilots were killed, among them the NASA astronaut-candidate Susan Reynolds aged 27.
Probable cause:
It is believed that the cabin pressurization system failed in flight, causing a slow decompression of the cabin. The crew probably lost consciousness then died after suffering hypoxia. After the fuel exhausted, both engines failed and the aircraft entered a rapid descent and crashed.

Crash of a Rockwell Aero Commander 520 in Addison

Date & Time: Jul 27, 1987 at 1101 LT
Registration:
N4164B
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Addison - Addison
MSN:
520-69
YOM:
1953
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
1176
Captain / Total hours on type:
206.00
Aircraft flight hours:
1920
Circumstances:
Aircraft was destroyed when it struck power lines and the ground during a single engine go-around. Following a left engine shut down due to severe vibrations, the pilot overflew one airport to return to his home base. En route, he elected not to go to full power due to a 3 minutes limitation he did not want to exceed. The pilot overshot the runway while manually extending the nose gear and elected to attempt a right 270° turn to return to final while at 100-150 feet agl. Nose landing did not extend due to hydraulic pump being on left engine and no pressure. During the turn, the pilot lost control and the aircraft struck the wires. Investigation revealed that one of the blade pitch change links on the left prop had disconnected, allowing one blade to free float. The link pin assembly had backed out as a result of the safety screw backing out due to damaged and stripped threads and an improper length screw being installed. Props had 1/4' safety screws installed instead of 3/8'.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: airframe/component/system failure/malfunction
Phase of operation: cruise - normal
Findings
1. (c) propeller system/accessories, pitch change mech - disconnected
2. Propeller feathering - not possible
3. (c) propeller system/accessories, pitch change mech - stripped thread
4. (c) maintenance, overhaul - inadequate - other maintenance personnel
5. (c) propeller system/accessories, pitch change mech - incorrect
6. (c) maintenance, installation - improper - pilot in command
7. Emergency procedure - improper - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #2: forced landing
Phase of operation: descent - emergency
----------
Occurrence #3: loss of control - in flight
Phase of operation: go-around (vfr)
Findings
8. (f) go-around - attempted - pilot in command
9. (c) airspeed (vmc) - not maintained - pilot in command
10. (c) diverted attention - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #4: in flight collision with object
Phase of operation: descent - uncontrolled
Findings
11. Object - wire, transmission
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421A Golden Eagle I in Addison: 4 killed

Date & Time: Jul 19, 1986 at 1150 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N6VR
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Addison - Atlanta
MSN:
421A-0027
YOM:
1967
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
750
Aircraft flight hours:
2896
Circumstances:
Witnesses reported a normal takeoff and climb was made to an altitude of approximately 400 feet agl at which time engine power ceased/decreased. The right wing then dropped, the nose and left wing rose and the aircraft entered a near vertical descent to ground impact. Post accident examination of the engines and turbochargers failed to disclose any pre-impact failures. Examination of the prop governors disclosed an rpm setting below takeoff or climb power; however, exact rpm setting could not be determined. The pilot had recently purchased this aircraft and most of his multi-engine experience was in Beech Barons. The throttle quadrant location of the throttle and prop controls on the Baron are in the reverse position of those on the Cessna 421. The pilot also had not been check out in the Cessna 421. All four occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: loss of control - in flight
Phase of operation: takeoff - initial climb
Findings
1. (c) propeller - reduced - pilot in command
2. (c) improper transition/upgrade training - pilot in command
3. (f) lack of recent experience in type of aircraft - pilot in command
4. (c) airspeed (vs) - not maintained - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #2: in flight collision with terrain/water
Phase of operation: descent - uncontrolled
----------
Occurrence #3: fire
Phase of operation: other
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421C Golden Eagle III in Addison: 1 killed

Date & Time: Oct 18, 1984 at 1452 LT
Registration:
N121BT
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Addison - Naples
MSN:
421C-0806
YOM:
1979
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
1620
Circumstances:
Approximately 7 minutes after takeoff (at 1441), the pilot declared an emergency and said the left engine had lost power. He feathered the engine, diverted back toward the airport and descended to VFR conditions below the clouds. At 1448, the pilot said he had the airport in sight and turned onto a left downwind for runway 15. Reportedly, he extended the landing gear and began a left turn toward the runway. Reportedly, the aircraft was too close in and/or the pilot chose to make a right turn away from the airport to land. Witnesses lost sight of the aircraft during the turn due to low clouds or obstructions. The pilot lost sight of the airport for a short time, then relocated it, but said he had his 'hands full.' Shortly thereafter, the aircraft entered a steep descent, hit the edge (roof) of a building, crashed into a utility pole and the ground and burned. There was evidence the aircraft was inverted just before impact. An exam of the left engine revealed evidence the #6 connecting rod had failed from oil exhaustion. Only one cup of oil was found in the engine and it had a history of high oil consumption. The pilot, sole on board, was killed.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: loss of engine power (total) - mech failure/malf
Phase of operation: climb - to cruise
Findings
1. (f) aircraft preflight - inadequate - pilot in command
2. (f) operation with known deficiencies in equipment - performed - pilot in command
3. (f) fluid, oil - starvation
4. Propeller feathering - performed
5. Initiated
6. Precautionary landing - initiated
----------
Occurrence #2: loss of control - in flight
Phase of operation: descent - normal
Findings
7. (c) emergency procedure - improper - pilot in command
8. (c) gear extension - premature - pilot in command
9. (c) airspeed (vmc) - not maintained - pilot in command
10. (c) aircraft handling - not maintained - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #3: in flight collision with object
Phase of operation: descent - uncontrolled
Findings
11. Object - building (non residential)
12. Object - utility pole
----------
Occurrence #4: in flight collision with terrain/water
Phase of operation: descent - uncontrolled
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 414A Chancellor in Mena: 2 killed

Date & Time: Feb 15, 1984 at 1656 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N6815Z
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Addison - Mena
MSN:
414A-0648
YOM:
1981
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
10100
Aircraft flight hours:
411
Circumstances:
The aircraft was cleared for Mena NDB approach and to maintain 5,000 feet msl until established on the approach. Aircraft descended to 4,800 feet msl on approximately ground track of 040° to 030° after NDB passage. Aircraft then turned to a ground track of 116°. After 12 seconds the aircraft turned to a ground track of 350° during which the ground speed decreased to 93 knots. The aircraft descended to 4,600 feet msl with ground speed increasing to 140 knots. N68152 reported 'we've broken below - will cancel in just a moment.' Radar contact was lost with the aircraft descending to 3,000 feet msl on a heading of 304°. The wreckage was found 6 miles northwest of the airport at an elevation of 2,000 feet msl. The outbound approach heading is 080° with procedure turn heading of 125° and 305°. Reported winds aloft at 5,000 feet msl, 4,000 feet msl and 3,000 feet msl were 191° at 34 knots, 169° at 30 knots and 151° at 32 knots respectively. Both occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: in flight collision with object
Phase of operation: approach - faf/outer marker to threshold (IFR)
Findings
1. (f) compensation for wind conditions - not performed - pilot in command
2. (f) minimum descent altitude - not attained - pilot in command
3. (c) ifr procedure - not followed - pilot in command
4. (f) terrain condition - mountainous/hilly
5. (f) weather condition - low ceiling
6. (f) object - tree(s)
Final Report: