Crash of a Cessna 421 Golden Eagle near Génova: 2 killed

Date & Time: May 27, 2018
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N113FT
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Guatemala City – El Petén
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
En route, the twin engine aircraft went out of control and crashed in unknown circumstances in an open field located near Génova. The aircraft came to rest inverted and both occupants were killed. It is understood that the registration is false as N113FT is officially attributed to a Piper PA-46 according to the FAA. Thus, it is believed the flight was illegal.

Crash of a Cessna 421 in Monterrey

Date & Time: May 21, 2015
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
XB-MTC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Monterrey – Piedras Negras
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Shortly after take off from Monterrey-Del Norte Airport, while climbing, the pilot encountered unknown technical problems and attempted an emergency landing in the Seventh Military Zone of the Secretary of the National Defense located west of the airport. The aircraft crashed in a pasture and came to rest in flames upside down. All five occupants were quickly rescued by military personal while the aircraft was partially destroyed by fire. As the s/n is unknown yet, it is unconfirmed if the aircraft involved was a Cessna 414 Chancellor or a Cessna 421 Golden Eagle.

Crash of a Cessna 421C Golden Eagle III in Annino AFB: 2 killed

Date & Time: Aug 22, 2012 at 1535 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
RA-0879G
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Annino - Annino
MSN:
421-0075
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
Crew was engaged in a training flight consisting of touch and goes and left Annino AFB (Gorelovo) in the afternoon. During initial climb, twin engine aircraft went out of control and crashed in a kindergarten located one km of the airport, 10 km west of Pulkovo Airport, St Petersburg. Aircraft was destroyed and both pilots were killed. It appears that right engine failed, aircraft banked right and crashed into the ground.

Crash of a Cessna 421C Golden Eagle III in Sioux Falls: 4 killed

Date & Time: Dec 9, 2011 at 1424 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N421SY
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Sioux Falls - Rapid City
MSN:
421-0051
YOM:
1975
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
3848
Captain / Total hours on type:
357.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4882
Circumstances:
Shortly after the airplane lifted off, the tower controller informed the pilot that a plume of smoke was visible behind the airplane. No communications were received from the pilot after he acknowledged the takeoff clearance. Witnesses reported that white smoke appeared to be trailing from the area of the left engine during takeoff. The witnesses subsequently observed flames at the inboard side of the left engine. The airplane began a left turn. As the airplane continued the turn, the flames and trail of white smoke were no longer visible. When the airplane reached a southerly heading, the nose dropped abruptly, and the airplane descended to the ground. Witnesses stated that they heard an increase in engine sound before impact. A postimpact fire ensued. The accident site was located about 3/4 mile from the airport. A postaccident examination determined that the left engine fuel selector and fuel valve were in the OFF position, consistent with the pilot shutting down that engine after takeoff. However, the left engine propeller was not feathered. Extensive damage to the right engine propeller assembly was consistent with that engine producing power at the time of impact. The landing gear and wing flaps were extended at the time of impact. Teardown examinations of both engines did not reveal any anomalies consistent with a loss of engine power. The left engine oil cap was observed to be unsecured at the accident site; however, postaccident comparison of the left and right engine oil caps revealed disproportionate distortion of the left oil cap, likely due to the postimpact fire. As a result, no determination was made regarding the security of left engine oil cap before the accident. Emergency procedures outlined in the pilot’s operating handbook (POH) noted that when securing an engine, the propeller should be feathered. Performance data provided in the POH for single-engine operations were predicated on the propeller of the inoperative engine being feathered, and the wing flaps and landing gear retracted. Thus, the pilot did not follow the emergency procedures outlined in the POH for single-engine operation.
Probable cause:
The pilot’s failure to maintain adequate airspeed after shutting down one engine, which resulted in an inadvertent aerodynamic stall and impact with terrain. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s failure to follow the guidance contained in the pilot’s operating handbook, which advised feathering the propeller of the secured engine and retracting the flaps and landing gear.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421C Golden Eagle III in Demopolis: 7 killed

Date & Time: Jul 9, 2011 at 1740 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N692TT
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Creve Coeur - Destin-Fort Walton Beach
MSN:
421-0616
YOM:
1974
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Captain / Total flying hours:
1000
Captain / Total hours on type:
340.00
Aircraft flight hours:
7800
Circumstances:
The multi-engine airplane was in cruise flight at flight level 210 when the pilot declared an emergency due to a rough-running right engine and diverted to a non-towered airport about 10 miles from the airplane’s position. About 4 minutes later, the pilot reported that he had shut down the right engine. The pilot orbited around the diversion airport during the descent and reported to an air traffic controller that he did not believe he would require any assistance after landing. The airplane initially approached the airport while descending through about 17,000 feet mean sea level (msl) and circled above the airport before entering a left traffic pattern approach for runway 22. About 7,000 feet msl, the airplane was about 2.5 miles northeast of the airport. The airplane descended through 2,300 feet msl when it was abeam the runway threshold on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern. According to the airplane information manual, procedures for landing with an inoperative engine call for “excessive altitude;” however, the airplane's last radar return showed the airplane at an altitude of 700 feet msl (about 600 feet above ground level) and about 3 miles from the approach end of the runway. The airplane was configured for a single-engine landing and was likely on or turning to the final approach course when it rolled and impacted trees. The airplane came to rest in a wooded area about 0.8 miles north of the runway threshold, inverted, in a flat attitude with no longitudinal deformation. A majority of the airplane, including the cockpit, main cabin, and left wing, were consumed by a postcrash fire. Search operations located the airplane about 6 hours after its expected arrival time. Due to the severity of the postcrash fire, occupant survivability after the impact could not be determined. Examination of the airframe, the left engine, and both propellers did not reveal any preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. The investigation revealed that the right engine failed when the camshaft stopped rotating after the camshaft gear experienced a fatigue fracture on one of its gear teeth. The remaining gear teeth were fractured in overstress and/or were crushed due to interference contact with the crankshaft gear. Spalling observed on an intact gear tooth suggested abnormal loading of the camshaft gear; however, the origin of the abnormal loading could not be determined.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain airplane control during a single-engine approach and his failure to fly an appropriate traffic pattern for a single-engine landing. Contributing to the accident was a total loss of engine power on the right engine due to a fatigue failure of the right engine cam gear.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421C Golden III Eagle in Connersville: 1 killed

Date & Time: Feb 23, 2011 at 2002 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N3875C
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Indianapolis - Connersville
MSN:
421-0127
YOM:
1976
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
1360
Captain / Total hours on type:
558.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4158
Circumstances:
A witness reported that, despite the darkness, he was able to see the navigation lights on the airplane as it flew over the south end of the airport at an altitude of 150 to 200 feet above the ground. The airplane made a left turn to the downwind leg of the traffic pattern and continued a descending turn until the airplane impacted the ground in a near-vertical attitude. Due to the airplane’s turn, the 10- to 20-knot quartering headwind became a quartering tailwind. The airplane was also turned toward a rural area with very little ground lighting. A postaccident examination of the airplane and engines did not reveal any preimpact anomalies that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane.
Probable cause:
The pilot did not maintain control of the airplane while making a low-altitude turn during dark night conditions.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421A Golden I Eagle in Tulsa: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jul 10, 2010 at 2205 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N88DF
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Pontiac - Riverside
MSN:
421-0084
YOM:
1968
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
592
Captain / Total hours on type:
67.00
Aircraft flight hours:
640
Circumstances:
During the 3.5-hour flight preceding the accident flight, the airplane used about 156 gallons of the 196 gallons of usable fuel. After landing, the airplane was topped off with 156 gallons of fuel for the return flight. During the preflight inspection, a line serviceman at the fixed based operator observed the right main fuel tank sump become stuck in the open position. He estimated 5 to 6 gallons of fuel were lost before the sump seal was regained, but the exact amount of fuel lost could not be determined. The lost fuel was not replaced before the airplane departed. Data from an on board GPS unit indicate that the airplane flew the return leg at an altitude of about 4,500 feet mean sea level for about 4 hours. About 4 minutes after beginning the descent to the destination airport, the pilot requested to divert to a closer airport. The pilot was cleared for an approach to runway 18R at the new destination. While on approach to land, the pilot reported to the air traffic control tower controller, “we exhausted fuel.” The airplane descended and crashed into a forested area about 1/2 mile from the airport. Post accident examination of the right and left propellers noted no leading edge impact damage or signatures indicative of rotation at the time of impact. Examination of the airplane wreckage and engines found no malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. The pilot did not report any problems with the airplane or its fuel state before announcing the fuel was exhausted. His acceptance of the approach to runway 18R resulted in the airplane flying at least 1 mile further than if he had requested to land on runway 18L instead. If the pilot had declared an emergency and made an immediate approach to the closest runway when he realized the exhausted fuel state, he likely would have reached the airport. Toxicological testing revealed cyclobenzaprine and diphenhydramine in the pilot’s system at or above therapeutic levels. Both medications carry warnings that use may impair mental and/or physical abilities required for activities such as driving or operating heavy machinery. The airplane would have used about 186 gallons of fuel on the 4-hour return flight if the engines burned fuel at the same rate as the previous flight. The fuel lost during the preflight inspection and the additional 30 minutes of flight time on the return leg reduced the airplane’s usable fuel available to complete the planned flight, and the pilot likely did not recognize the low fuel state before the fuel was exhausted due to impairment by the medications he was taking.
Probable cause:
The pilot’s inadequate preflight fuel planning and management in-flight, which resulted in total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s use of performance-impairing medications.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II in Alpine: 5 killed

Date & Time: Jul 4, 2010 at 0015 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N31AS
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Alpine - Odessa
MSN:
421-0473
YOM:
1973
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
1650
Captain / Total hours on type:
160.00
Aircraft flight hours:
2302
Circumstances:
The airplane impacted terrain shortly after takeoff. The wreckage distribution was consistent with a high airspeed, low angle-of-attack impact. Examination of the ground scars and wreckage indicated that the landing gear was down, the flaps were down, and the engines were operating at a high power setting at the time of impact. An examination of the airframe, engines, and related systems revealed no mechanical malfunctions or failures. According to the owner’s manual for the airplane, the flaps should have been retracted and the landing gear should have been brought up as soon as a climb profile was established. Based upon the location of the wreckage, the direction of the impact, and the location of the airport, it is likely that the airplane crashed within one or two minutes after takeoff. The extended landing gear and flaps degraded the climb performance of the airplane. The pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate and had recent night flight experience. Toxicological results were positive for azacyclonol and ibuprofen but were not at levels that would have affected his performance. According to family members, the pilot normally slept from 2230 or 2300 to 0700; the accident occurred at 0015. Although the investigation was unable to determine how long the pilot had been awake before the accident or his sleep schedule in the three days prior to the accident, it is possible that the pilot was fatigued, as the accident occurred at a time when the pilot was normally asleep. The company did not have, and was not required to have guidance or a policy addressing fatigue management.
Probable cause:
The degraded performance of the airplane due to the pilot not properly setting the flaps and retracting the landing gear after takeoff. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s fatigue.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421 Golden Eagle in Tegucigalpa: 3 killed

Date & Time: Mar 10, 2010 at 1405 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
TG-JYM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Tegucigalpa-La Mesa
MSN:
421-0403
YOM:
1973
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:

The twin engine aircraft crashed three minutes after takeoff from Tegucigalpa-Toncontin airport. All three occupants were killed.

Crash of a Cessna 421 Golden Eagle in Florida: 5 killed

Date & Time: Jul 8, 2009 at 1352 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N4467D
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
McKinney-Tampa
MSN:
421-0634
YOM:
1974
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:

While approaching Florida coast, the pilot informed ATC about severe turbulences. Later, the aircraft crashed into the sea, 20 miles off shore. All five occupants were killed.