Crash of a Cessna T303 Crusader in Santa Rosa del Toachi: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jun 6, 2009 at 1300 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
HC-BRD
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Guayaquil - Santo Domingo
MSN:
303-00084
YOM:
1981
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
While cruising in poor weather conditions, the twin engine aircraft impacted trees and crashed in a wooded an hilly terrain located in the Santa Rosa del Toachi Mountain Range. The wreckage was found few hours later and the pilot, sole on board, was killed.
Probable cause:
Controlled flight into terrain after the pilot was flying under VFR mode in IMC conditions.

Crash of a Cessna T303 Crusader near Zadar: 4 killed

Date & Time: Feb 5, 2009 at 1454 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
9A-DLN
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Zagreb – Zadar
MSN:
303-00089
YOM:
1981
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
20000
Copilot / Total flying hours:
3000
Circumstances:
The crew departed Zagreb Airport on a training flight to Zadar. While descending to Zadar Airport, he encountered marginal weather with icing conditions. At an altitude of 6,500 feet in clouds, the aircraft lost height and crashed in the Velebit Mountain Range. The aircraft was destroyed by impact forces and all four occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
The most probable cause of the accident is the entry with an uncertified aircraft into icing conditions and in mountain waves. The plane most likely froze on its tail first. After the plane most likely froze completely, it became too heavy, entered mountain waves, became completely uncontrollable, after which it crashed at a sharp angle from a height of about 6,500 feet and hit a hill at the foot of Vaganski Vrh. Due to the force of the impact, the plane completely disintegrated.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna T303 Crusader in Bratislava: 3 killed

Date & Time: Dec 10, 2007
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
9A-DGV
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Zagreb – Bratislava
MSN:
303-00186
YOM:
1982
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
On approach to Bratislava-Ivanka-Milan Ratislav Štefánik Airport, the twin engine aircraft crashed in an open field located few kilometres from the airport, bursting into flames. All three occupants were killed. Weather conditions were marginal at the time of the accident.

Crash of a Cessna T303 Crusader in Mill Creek: 5 killed

Date & Time: Nov 13, 2006 at 2003 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N611BB
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
South Bend - Ankeny
MSN:
303-00145
YOM:
1982
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
504
Aircraft flight hours:
4577
Circumstances:
The pilot departed his home airport at 0502 and landed at another airport where he picked up employees of a marketing company to fly them to an out of state meeting. The accident occurred at 2003 shortly after taking off on the return trip to fly the employees back home. Shortly before departure a fourth passenger was added to the flight after his commercial flight was cancelled. A person who worked for the fixed base operator at the departure airport stated the pilot looked tired or just ready to go home. The pilot received his clearance for the IFR flight prior to takeoff. The pilot misread the clearance back to the controlled and was corrected. Radar data showed the pilot initially flew the assigned south-southwest heading prior to the airplane turning right to a westerly heading. The controller queried the pilot and issued a heading to intercept the VOR. The pilot corrected the heading and shortly thereafter the airplane once again began a right turn back toward the west. The airplane continued to climb throughout the heading changes. Radar data showed the airplane then began another left turn during which time it entered a spiraling rapid descent. According to weather data, the airplane was in instrument meteorological conditions when this occurred. The airplane impacted the terrain in an open cornfield. Weight and balance calculations indicate the airplane was at least 383 pounds over gross weight. Post accident inspection of the airplane and engines did not reveal any preexisting failure/malfunction.
Probable cause:
The pilot became spatially disoriented and as a result failed to maintain control of the airplane. Factors associated with the accident were the instrument meteorological conditions aloft and the pilot being fatigued.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna T303 Crusader off Aldeburgh

Date & Time: Sep 19, 2006 at 1328 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
D-IAFC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Braunschweig – Oxford
MSN:
303-00244
YOM:
1983
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
24000
Captain / Total hours on type:
6000.00
Circumstances:
Whilst on a cargo flight from Braunschweig, Germany, to Oxford, England, when approximately 30 nm from the English coast, the right engine started to run roughly. On checking the fuel gauges, the pilot observed that they were indicating in the ‘red sector’. The right engine subsequently stopped, shortly followed by the left engine. The aircraft then glided from FL100 towards the Suffolk coast and ditched in the sea approximately 9.5 nm southeast of Aldeburgh. The pilot was able to abandon the aircraft, which sank quickly. He was rescued from the sea some 18 minutes later by a Royal Air Force Search and Rescue helicopter and taken to hospital, where he was found to have suffered a fractured a vertebra. The investigation determined that the aircraft had run out of fuel, due to insufficient fuel for the intended journey being on-board the aircraft at the start of the flight.
Probable cause:
The accident occurred as a result of the aircraft running out of fuel approximately 160 nm short of its destination. Although the wreckage of the aircraft was not recovered, all the evidence suggests that this occurred due to insufficient fuel being on-board the aircraft prior to departure, rather than because of a technical problem. The pilot’s lack of awareness of the fuel quantity and the actual weight of the cargo on board D-IAFC prior to takeoff, are considered to have been significant causal factors in the accident. A contributory factor was that the pilot did not monitor the reportedly ‘unreliable’ fuel gauges, thus missing a chance to notice the aircraft’s low fuel state and divert to a suitable airfield before the situation became critical.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna T303 Crusader in Denham Green

Date & Time: Aug 5, 2006 at 1810 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-PTWB
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Durham Tees Valley - Denham Green
MSN:
T303-00306
YOM:
1984
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
1717
Captain / Total hours on type:
662.00
Circumstances:
The aircraft was completing a day VFR flight from Durham Tees Valley Airport to Denham Airfield. As the pilot turned on to the final approach for Runway 06, the right engine ran down. The pilot attempted to increase power on the left engine but it did not appear to respond. The airspeed decayed and the right wing dropped. The aircraft descended into a wooded area short of the runway, seriously injuring all those on board. The investigation identified that fuel starvation of both engines was the cause of the accident.
Probable cause:
The pilot was properly licensed and qualified to conduct the flight. The aircraft was fully serviceable and the weather was suitable for the flight and was not a factor in the accident. From the evidence provided, the loading of the aircraft was such that it was operated initially above the MTOW of 5,150 lbs and throughout the flight the aircraft was operated outside the aft CG limit of 157.2 inches aft of datum. With the payload being carried, the aircraft was not capable of safely completing the ‘round trip’ flight and remaining within the permitted weight and balance envelope without refuelling at Durham Tees Valley. Insufficient fuel was carried for adequate reserves and contingency fuel to complete the flight. The pilot had consumed alcoholic beverage during the day but the effect on his decision making and aircraft handling ability is not known. During the approach, the fuel crossfeed was used, which was not permitted. The selection of crossfeed from the left tank to the right engine was probably the cause of the right engine running down. This was due to insufficient fuel contents being available to allow fuel to be drawn from the left tank by the crossfeed pick-up. Pulling the crossfeed emergency shutoff control therefore did not contribute to the accident. The accident was caused by fuel starvation of both engines with the right engine ceasing to produce power and the left engine operating at reduced power or stopping. Control was then lost when the airspeed decayed and the aircraft stalled, dropping the right wing.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 303 TCrusader near Dossenheim: 1 killed

Date & Time: Oct 20, 2000 at 0900 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N9645C
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Regensburg - Mannheim
MSN:
303-00197
YOM:
1982
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
875
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft departed Regensburg-Oberhub Airport in the morning on a flight to Mannheim City. About 15 minutes prior to arrival, the pilot cancelled his IFR flight plan and started the descent under VFR mode. On approach, at an altitude of 1,700 feet and at a speed of 110 knots, the aircraft struck tree tops and crashed in a wooded and hilly terrain located east of Dossenheim, about 15 km southeast of Mannheim Airport, bursting into flames. The aircraft was destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire and the pilot, sole on board, was seriously injured. He died from his injuries two weeks later.
Probable cause:
The decision of the pilot to continue the approach under VFR mode in IMC conditions. The limited visibility caused by low clouds was considered as a contributing factor. At the time of the accident, the hilly terrain was shrouded in clouds. For unknown reasons, the approach speed was relatively low (110 knots).
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna T303 Crusader in Rottweil

Date & Time: May 7, 2000 at 1859 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
D-IFKL
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Schwenningen - Rottweil
MSN:
303-00261
YOM:
1983
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Upon landing at Rottweil-Zepfenhan Airport, during the last segment, at a height of about 5-10 metres, the aircraft rolled to the left. The pilot initiated a go-around procedure when control was lost. The aircraft crashed and burned. The pilot was injured.

Crash of a Cessna T303 Crusader in Binghamton

Date & Time: Nov 1, 1999 at 0616 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N511AR
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Portland – Youngstown
MSN:
303-00192
YOM:
1982
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2430
Captain / Total hours on type:
60.00
Aircraft flight hours:
5480
Circumstances:
While in cruise flight, at 6,000 feet, the left engine lost power. The pilot attempted a restart of the engine, but only about one-half rotation of the left engine propeller was observed, and the engine was secured. The pilot stated that he was unable to maintain altitude and initiated a decent. He requested and was cleared for an instrument approach at an airport where the weather conditions were, 1/4 statute mile of visibility, fog, and a vertical visibility of 100 feet. On the approach, at the minimum descent altitude, the pilot executed a missed approach. As the airplane climbed, the pilot reported to the controller that the 'best altitude [he] could get was 2,200 feet.' A second approach was initiated to the reciprocal runway. While on the second approach, the pilot 'was going to fly the aircraft right to the runway, and told the controller so.' He put the gear down, reduced power, and decided there was 'no hope for a go-around.' He then 'flew down past the decision height,' and about 70-80 feet above the ground, 'added a little power to smooth the landing.' The pilot also stated, 'The last thing I remember was the aircraft nose contacting the runway.' A passenger stated that once the pilot could not see the runway, [the pilot] 'applied power, pitched the nose up,' and attempted a 'go-around' similar to the one that was executed on the first approach. Disassembly of the left engine revealed that the crankshaft was fatigue fractured between connecting rod journal number 2 and main journal number 2. Review of the pilot's operating handbook revealed that the single engine service ceiling, at a weight of 4,800 pounds, was 11,700 feet. The average single engine rate of climb, at a pressure altitude of 6,000 feet, was 295 feet per minute. The average single engine rate of climb, at a pressure altitude of 1,625 feet, was 314 feet per minute. Review of the ILS approach plate for Runway 34 revealed that the decision height was 200 feet above the ground.
Probable cause:
The pilot's improper in-flight decision to descend below the decision height without the runway environment in sight, and his failure to execute a missed approach. A factor in the accident was the failed crankshaft.
Final Report: