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Crash of an Airspeed AS.6 Envoy in Alcocero de Mola: 4 killed

Date & Time: Jun 3, 1937
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
41-1
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
MSN:
17
YOM:
1934
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
The aircraft was on its way to Vitoria with General Emilio Mola on board. While cruising in poor weather conditions northeast of Burgos, the aircraft hit a mountain slope and crashed near Alcocero de Mola. All four occupants were killed.

Crash of an Airspeed AS.6 Envoy in Titsey Hill: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jan 22, 1937
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-ADBZ
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Croydon – Paris
MSN:
35
YOM:
1935
Location:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The crew was performing a mail flight from Croydon to Paris when the aircraft crashed in unknown circumstances in Titsey Hill, near Oxted. Both occupants were killed.
Crew:
G. S. Jones-Evans, pilot,
J. Walker, radio operator.

Crash of an Airspeed AS.6J Envoy III in Abercorn: 2 killed

Date & Time: Oct 1, 1936
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-AENA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Portsmouth - Johannesburg
MSN:
60
YOM:
1936
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The aircraft christened 'Gabrielle' was owned by the British Max H. Findlay & Ken H. F. Waller who were taking part to the 'Schlesinger Trophy' between Portsmouth and Johannesburg. On takeoff from Abercorn Airfield, Northern Rhodesia, the twin engine aircraft went out of control and crashed in the bush. The pilot Max Findlay and the radio operator A. H. Morgan were killed while both other occupants were injured.
Crew:
Max H. Findlay, pilot,
Ken H. F. Waller, copilot,
A.H. Morgan, radio operator,
C. Derek Peachey, engineer.

Crash of an Airspeed AS.6A Envoy I near Alès: 2 killed

Date & Time: Aug 28, 1936
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
G-ADCA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Paris – Barcelona
MSN:
36
YOM:
1935
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft was on its way to Barcelona to be delivered to the Spanish Nationalists Air Force. En route, while cruising over the region of Alès, the aircraft crashed in unknown circumstances. Both crew were killed. The flight was operated by the French Office Général de l'Air (OGA) according to an international treaty between England, France and Spain.

Crash of an Airspeed AS.6A Envoy off Hawaii: 3 killed

Date & Time: Dec 3, 1934 at 1000 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-UXY
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Vancouver – San Francisco – Oakland – Honolulu – Melbourne
MSN:
31
YOM:
1935
Location:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
The crew was intending to operate a flight from Vancouver to Melbourne with intermediate stops in San Francisco, Oakland and Honolulu, on board this aircraft christened 'Stella Australis'. While approaching Hawaiian coast, crew encountered poor weather conditions. Due to low visibility, he was unable to localize the islands and sent several radio messages advising he was lost and running out of fuel. The aircraft eventually ditched into the sea around 1000LT. Despite an extensive and immediate search by aircraft and 23 naval ships, no trace of the Envoy nor the crew was ever found. Captain Ulm had chosen not to carry a life raft on board, preferring to save weight and predicting the aircraft would float for two days if it were forced to land on water.
Crew:
Charles T.P. Ulm, pilot,
G. M. Littlejohn, copilot,
J.S. Skilling, radio navigator.
Probable cause:
It is believed an unexpected tailwind and bad weather caused the aircraft to fly past the islands in the dark (early morning). The wind was about 35 knots from the south-southeast and the aircraft may also have been pushed north of the islands.