Crash of a Short 330-200 in Myrtle Beach

Date & Time: May 18, 2006 at 0745 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N937MA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Greensboro – Myrtle Beach
MSN:
3040
YOM:
1980
Flight number:
SNC1340
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Aircraft flight hours:
21095
Circumstances:
Following an uneventful cargo flight from Greensboro, NC, the aircraft made a wheels-up landing on runway 18 at Myrtle Beach Airport, SC. The aircraft slid on its belly for few dozen metres before coming to rest on the main runway. Both pilots escaped uninjured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
NTSB did not conduct any investigation on this event.

Crash of a Beechcraft 200 Super King Air in North Myrtle Beach: 6 killed

Date & Time: Feb 3, 2006 at 2045 LT
Registration:
N266EB
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Trenton - North Myrtle Beach
MSN:
BB-266
YOM:
1977
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Captain / Total flying hours:
3400
Aircraft flight hours:
8154
Circumstances:
The multi-engine airplane rolled inverted and dove into the ground on a landing approach. According to witnesses, the airplane made two approaches to runway 23. During the first approach the airplane was observed, "fish tailing" while about 30' feet over the runway. The airplane appeared to regain control and continued flying over the runway until passing the air traffic control tower, at which time the airplane began a climbing left turn. The witnesses stated that they heard the pilot tell the air traffic controller that he was doing a go-around. The controller asked the pilot if he had problems with the sea fog. The pilot responded back to the controller "no that his left engine kept power up a little too much and would not come back." The witnesses observed the airplane circle the airport to the left, and watched it line up on runway 23 for the second time. The witnesses stated that as the airplane descended to the runway and without any indication of trouble, the airplane "climbed and rolled left, went inverted and nosed down into the grass to the left of the runway and burst into flames." Examination of the airplane, airplane systems, engines, and propellers found no abnormal preimpact conditions that would have interfered with the normal operation of the airplane. No recorded radar data for the flight was located that captured the airplane's two attempted landings. Information contained in the Super King Air 200 Pilot's Operating Handbook (POH) and FAA Approved Flight Manual (AFM) showed the stall speed with gear extended, 40-degrees flaps, and zero bank angle as 84 knots Indicated Air Speed.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain control during landing approach for undetermined reasons.
Final Report:

Crash of an Embraer EMB-110P1 Bandeirante in Orangeburg

Date & Time: Dec 9, 2005 at 2240 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N790RA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Savannah - Columbia
MSN:
110-278
YOM:
1980
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2250
Captain / Total hours on type:
195.00
Aircraft flight hours:
14837
Circumstances:
The pilot had flown the airplane the day before the accident and after landing on the morning of the accident; she ordered fuel for the airplane. While exiting the airplane another pilot informed her that he had heard a "popping noise" coming from one of the engines. The pilot of the accident airplane elected to taxi to a run up area to conduct an engine run up. The fuel truck arrived at the run up area and the pilot elected not to refuel the airplane at that time and continued the run up. No anomalies were noted during the run up and the airplane was taxied back to the ramp and parked. The pilot arrived back at the airport later on the day of the accident and did not re-order fuel for the airplane nor did she recall checking the fuel tanks during the preflight inspection of the airplane. The pilot departed and was in cruise flight when she noticed the fuel light on the annunciator panel flickering. The pilot checked the fuel gauges and observed less than 100 pounds of fuel per-side indicated. The pilot declared low fuel with Columbia Approach Control controllers and requested to divert to the nearest airport, Orangeburg Municipal. The controller cleared the pilot for a visual approach to the airport and as she turned the airplane for final, the left engine lost power followed by the right engine. The pilot made a forced landing into the trees about 1/4 mile from the approach end of runway 36. The pilot exited the airplane and telephoned 911 emergency operators on her cell phone. The pilot stated she did not experience any mechanical problems with the airplane before the accident. Examination of the airplane by an FAA inspector revealed the fuel tanks were not ruptured and no fuel was present in the fuel tanks.
Probable cause:
The pilot's inadequate preflight inspection and her failure to refuel the airplane which resulted in total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion, and subsequent in-flight collision with trees.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-61p Aerostar (Ted Smith 601P) in Johns Island: 2 killed

Date & Time: Apr 5, 2004 at 1526 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N869CC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Johns Island - Charleston
MSN:
61-0235-035
YOM:
1975
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
2007
Captain / Total hours on type:
35.00
Aircraft flight hours:
3805
Circumstances:
A witness at a nearby maintenance facility stated the pilot telephoned him and told him that, during engine start, one engine sputtered and abruptly stopped. The witness stated the pilot told him he wanted to fly the airplane over to have the problem looked at. A witness, who was an airline transport-rated corporate pilot, observed the airplane on takeoff roll and stated the airplane rotated "really late," using approximately 4,000 feet of runway. He stated the airplane climbed to about 400 or 500 feet, then descended in a left spin into the trees. The airplane collided with the ground and caught fire. Examination of the right engine revealed external fire damage and no evidence of mechanical malfunction. Examination of the left engine revealed external fire damage. Disassembly examination of the left engine revealed the rear side of the No. 5 piston from top to bottom was eroded away with characteristics consistent with detonation. The spark plugs displayed "normal" deposits and wear, except the No. 5 bottom plug was contaminated with a fragment of piston ring material, the No. 5 top plug had a dark sooty appearance, and the nose core of the No. 2 bottom plug was fragmented. Flow bench examination of the left fuel servo revealed no abnormalities. The fuel flow manifold diaphragm was heat-damaged. Flow bench examination of the fuel injector lines and nozzles on a serviceable fuel flow manifold revealed the lines and nozzles were free of obstruction. A review of Emergency Operating Procedures for the Aerostar 601P revealed the following: "Normal procedures do not require operation below the single engine minimum control speed, however, should this condition inadvertently arise and engine failure occur, power on the operating engine should immediately be reduced and the nose lowered to attain a speed above ... the single engine minimum control speed."
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain airspeed during emergency descent, which resulted in an inadvertent stall/spin and uncontrolled descent into trees and terrain. A factor was the loss of engine power in one engine due to pre-ignition/detonation.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft A90 King Air in Summerville

Date & Time: Sep 21, 2003 at 2330 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N34HA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Barnwell – Summerville
MSN:
LJ-315
YOM:
1967
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
9000
Captain / Total hours on type:
1000.00
Circumstances:
According to the pilot, prior to takeoff, he had the airplane fueled with 20 gallons of fuel in each wing for the short cross-country flight. After takeoff the airplane climbed to an altitude of 9500 feet. During the downwind to the arrival airport the right engine lost power. Shortly after the left engine lost power, the pilot made an emergency off-airport landing. Examination of the fuel system revealed that the fuel tanks were not beached, and there was a small amount of residual fuel in the fuel tanks. The exact amount of fuel onboard the airplane at the time of the departure was not determined.
Probable cause:
The pilot's inadequate preflight planning which resulted in fuel exhaustion and subsequent loss of engine power.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-46-310P Malibu in Hilton Head: 2 killed

Date & Time: Aug 31, 2003 at 1529 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N70DL
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Hilton Head – Myrtle Beach
MSN:
46-8608001
YOM:
1986
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
2536
Captain / Total hours on type:
186.00
Aircraft flight hours:
2676
Circumstances:
The airplane was returning to the airport for landing. A witness reported it was flying erratically streaming a whitish "vapor trail" from the left wing. Another witness reported the airplane banked abruptly into a steep turn to the left, the nose pitched up, and the airplane sank from view behind the trees. The witness then heard a crash and saw smoke. Examination revealed no evidence of flight control, engine, or propeller malfunction. The left inboard fuel cap was absent from the filler port, and a ground search found the left inboard fuel cap in the grass beside the runway. The JetProp LLC, JetProp DLX Supplemental Flight Manual, Section 4, Normal Procedures Checklist, states, "Left Wing 4.9e, ... Inboard Fuel Tank ... CHECK Supply Visually & SECURE CAP ..." Examination of the JetProp LLC, JetProp DLX Supplemental Flight Manual and the Piper Malibu PA-46-310P Information Manual revealed the following instructions on how to secure the fuel caps: "Replace cap securely." There was no evidence of mechanical malfunction with the fuel cap or the filler port.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain control of the airplane during a VFR pattern for a precautionary landing, which resulted in an uncontrolled descent and subsequent collision with terrain. Also causal was the pilot's inadequate preflight inspection of the aircraft, which resulted in his failure to secure the fuel cap.
Final Report:

Crash of a Rockwell Shrike Commander 500S in Mount Pleasant

Date & Time: Apr 14, 2003 at 1140 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N19WL
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Mount Pleasant - Mount Pleasant
MSN:
500-3160
YOM:
1973
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
4578
Captain / Total hours on type:
280.00
Aircraft flight hours:
11617
Circumstances:
According to the pilot, he requested the refueler to top off his fuel tanks with "100 low lead fuel". After refueling, the pilot performed a preflight including taking fuel samples from under the wings, draining the rear fuel drain, and checking the fuel cap for security. The engine start, run-up, and taxi were uneventful. The airplane departed runway 17 and was in a positive rate of climb. At approximately 200 feet AGL the airplane began to lose power. Shortly after the pilot ensured that the throttle, propeller, and mixture controls were in the full forward position, the airplane lost power in both engines. The pilot executed an emergency off field landing. Examination of the wreckage revealed that the left wing had broken off and the aft cabin area was crushed. According to the refueler, he stated that he mistakenly used the Jet-A fuel truck instead of the AVGAS 100 low lead truck, and pumped 58 gallons of Jet-A into the airplane. Examination of the fuel samples taken from both engines revealed the left and right engine contained 70 percent of jet A fuel.
Probable cause:
The improper refueling of the airplane by airport personnel with the incorrect fuel grade that resulted in a total loss in engine power on both engines during initial climb. A factor was the inadequate preflight inspection by the pilot in command.
Final Report:

Crash of a Mitsubishi MU-2B-35 Marquise in Hilton Head: 1 killed

Date & Time: Aug 1, 2001 at 0751 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N1VY
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Columbia – Savannah – Hilton Head
MSN:
567
YOM:
1972
Flight number:
BKA170
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
4184
Captain / Total hours on type:
483.00
Aircraft flight hours:
11612
Circumstances:
The airplane was on final approach to land at Hilton Head Airport, when according to witnesses, it suddenly rolled to the right, and descended, initially impacting trees at about the 70-foot level, and then impacting the ground. A fire then ensued upon ground impact, and the debris field spanned about 370 feet along an azimuth of about 082 degrees. Examination of the airplane wreckage revealed that left wing flap actuator and jack nut measurements were consistent with the wing flaps being extended to 40 degrees, and on the right wing the flap jack nut and actuator measurements were consistent with the right flap being extended to about a 20-degrees. In addition, the right flap torque tube assembly between the flap motor and the flap stop assembly had disconnected, and the flap torque tube assembly's female coupler which attaches to the male spline end of the flap motor and flap stop assembly was found with a cotter pin installed through the female coupler of the flap stop assembly. The cotter pin, had not been placed through the spline and the coupler consistent with normal installation as per Mitsubishi's maintenance manual, or as specified in Airworthiness Directive 88-23-01. Instead, the cotter pin had missed the male spline on the flap motor. In addition, the flap coupler on the opposite side of the flap motor was found to also found to not have a cotter pin installed. Company maintenance records showed that on April 3, 2001, about 87 flight hours before the accident, the airplane was inspected per Airworthiness Directive (AD) 88-23-01, which required the disassembly, inspection, and reassembly of the flap torque tube joints. In addition, on July 9, 2001, the airplane was given a phase 1 inspection, and Bankair records showed that a company authorized maintenance person performed the applicable maintenance items, and certified the airplane for return to service.
Probable cause:
Improper maintenance/installation and and inadequate inspection of the airplane's flap torque tube joints during routine maintenance by company maintenance personnel, which resulted in the right flap torque tube assembly coupler becoming detached and the flaps developing asymmetrical lift when extended, which resulted in an uncontrolled roll, a descent, and an impact with a tree during approach to land.
Final Report:

Crash of a Rockwell Aero Commander 500 in Georgetown: 2 killed

Date & Time: Dec 22, 1999 at 1525 LT
Registration:
N6261B
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Georgetown - Orlando
MSN:
500-0688-34
YOM:
1958
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
564
Captain / Total hours on type:
69.00
Aircraft flight hours:
3783
Circumstances:
The non instrument-rated pilot attempted VFR flight into known instrument flight conditions after being briefed by an FAA Automated Flight Service Station that VFR flight was not recommended. The pilot encountered instrument flight conditions while maneuvering on initial takeoff climb, experienced an in-flight loss of control (stall/spin) due to failure to maintain airspeed, and subsequent in-flight collision with trees and terrain.
Probable cause:
The non instrument-rated pilot's improper decision to attempt VFR flight into known instrument flight conditions, willful disregard of FAA Automated Flight Service Station weather forecast/weather observations, failure to maintain airspeed (VSO) while maneuvering on initial takeoff climb, resulting in an in-flight loss of control (inadvertent stall/spin), and subsequent in-flight collision with trees and terrain.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft King Air 90 in Beaufort: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 19, 1999 at 2035 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N75CF
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Hilton Head - Beaufort
MSN:
LW-212
YOM:
1977
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
21250
Aircraft flight hours:
10316
Circumstances:
The PIC was cleared for an ASR approach to the destination airport. The co-pilot was looking outside to obtain a visual reference on the destination airport. They broke out of the clouds at about 900 feet, and were descending at about 480 feet per minute. The ceiling was overcast, ragged, and very dark with no visible horizon. The co-pilot looked back inside the cockpit to check the radios when he heard a thump. The PIC had continued the descent below the minimum descent altitude, the airplane collided with the marsh and crashed.
Probable cause:
The pilot-in-commands failure to maintain the appropriate altitude (minimum descent altitude) during an area surveillance radar (ASR) approach, resulting in an in-flight collision with swampy terrain. Contributing to the accident was the co-pilot's failure to maintain a visual lookout during the ASR approach.
Final Report: