Country
code

Corse-du-Sud

Crash of a Beechcraft King Air 90 in Ajaccio: 5 killed

Date & Time: Jul 17, 1994 at 1400 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
F-ZBBF
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Marseille-Marseille
MSN:
LJ-0518
YOM:
1971
Flight number:
Bengal 97
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5

Crash of a Britten-Norman BN-2A-8 Islander in Ajaccio

Date & Time: Jun 23, 1984
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
F-BVTD
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Ajaccio - Ajaccio
MSN:
710
YOM:
1974
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew was completing a local training flight at Ajaccio-Campo dell’Oro Airport, simulating engine failure. In unclear circumstances, the pilot lost control of the aircraft that crashed near the airport. Both occupants were injured and the aircraft was destroyed.

Crash of a McDonnell Douglas MD-82 on Mt San Pietro: 180 killed

Date & Time: Dec 1, 1981 at 0853 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
YU-ANA
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Ljubljana - Ajaccio
MSN:
48047/998
YOM:
1981
Flight number:
JP1308
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
8
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
172
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
180
Captain / Total flying hours:
12123
Captain / Total hours on type:
188.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
4213
Copilot / Total hours on type:
288
Aircraft flight hours:
683
Circumstances:
The McDonnell Douglas MD-82 departed Ljubljana at 0741LT on a charter flight to Ajaccio, carrying 173 passengers and a crew of seven. Following an uneventful flight at FL330, the crew descended at FL190 at 0835LT then the copilot's son entered the cockpit and was allowed to take the observer's seat. Further descent instructions and radar vectors were obtained and at 08:47 the flight transferred to the Ajaccio Approach controller. The controller cleared the flight to the AJO VOR at FL110 and to report when overhead the VOR. He also passed on weather information and the reported that runway 21 was the runway in use. At 0849LT the crew reported over the AJO VOR. The controller cleared the flight to descend to 3,300 feet on the 247 radial of the AJO VOR. Three minutes later the flight radioed: "Rolling inbound out of six thousand". By that time the airplane had descended below the minimum holding altitude of 6,800 feet for that area. He then reported: "Turning inbound to Ajaccio because at the moment we are in cloud." The controller then replied: "Roger, 1308, report Charlie Tango on final, surface wind two eight zero degrees, twenty knots." There was no response from flight 1308. Flight 1308 was flying a holding pattern to lose altitude, but the controller believed the aircraft was going to make a direct descent to begin the final approach. Hence the reference to the Charlie Tango (CT) NDB beacon. The GPWS warning sounded in the cockpit and the crew increased engine power to gain altitude. 13 seconds later, at a speed of 285 knots, the left wing struck the Punta di Junca and was partially torn off. The aircraft rolled to the left and crashed seven seconds later in steep cliffs located 700 meters below, about 32 km southeast of Ajaccio-Campo dell’Oro Airport. The aircraft was totally destroyed and all 180 occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
The Committee considers that the cause of this accident was that the descent undertaken by the crew led the aircraft to find itself in clouds below the instruments safety altitude for that part of the flight path. The Committee noted that when the crew, alerted by the GPWS, tried to regain altitude, the maneuver proved to be insufficient to overcome the effect of strong descending air currents due to relief and strong wind, present in the area where the aircraft was flying at that time. The following contributing factors were reported:
- The committee felt that the crew did not show the necessary rigor when preparing its approach. It does not appear that a logical order has guided the crew in the revision and memorization of various parameters, including the safe altitude and the maximum speed of the holding circuit, which in any case, did not catch the attention of the crew in an appropriate manner. In addition, the presence of a young child on the observer seat cockpit, until the end of the flight was a dispersion factor of attention;
- The misunderstandings which have developed in the exchange of messages between the captain and the approach controller could disrupt, at certain times, the working conditions of the crew. The controller consequently did not have an accurate representation of the progress of the aircraft in the performance of its procedure and, therefore, did not intervene when two messages "call you inbound on radial two forty seven", and then "rolling inbound out of six thousand" would have told him, if he had better interpreted them, an ambiguous situation for the first and abnormal and dangerous for the second;
- The advice to the commission on vectoring habits and on habits supposedly used by some national air traffic services to systematically take into account the safety altitudes in formulating control permissions, leads to the suspicion that some crew have a slightest concern about the safe altitudes;
- Airspeed of the aircraft was greater than the maximum speed of the holding pattern and crew did not adopt the correction factors adapted to altitude wind they had encountered during the previous segment th flight. This led to the airplane overfly an area where, although it is included in the protected area of the holding pattern, the upper air movements were particularly important;
- The symbolic representation of the holding pattern on the approach chart used by the crew corresponds to a path, with no wind, and an aircraft which would have approximately 150 knots indicated airspeed. It calls not evident attention to Airmen on the actual dimensions of the actually travelled circuits in flight, nor therefore on altitude over the terrain reliefs.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-31-310 Navajo off Ajaccio

Date & Time: Jun 28, 1981
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N9068Y
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
31-98
YOM:
1968
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Crashed in unknown circumstances in the Mediterranean Sea shortly after takeoff from Ajaccio-Campo dell’Oro Airport. The pilot, sole on board, was rescued while the aircraft was lost.

Crash of a Nord 2501 Noratlas near Petreto-Bicchisano: 4 killed

Date & Time: Sep 6, 1974
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
143
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
MSN:
143
YOM:
1957
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
While in a liaison flight on behalf of 01/062 Vercors Squadron, the twin engine airplane struck the slope of Monte San Petru (1,400 meters high) located three km southeast of Petreto-Bicchisano, Corsica. The aircraft was destroyed and all four crew members were killed.
Crew:
Cdt Yvon Mussetta,
Cpt Jean Bombes de Villiers,
Adj Albert Rougies,
Sgt Patrick Steffen.

Crash of a Canadair CL-215-1A10 into the Gulf of Sagona: 2 killed

Date & Time: Aug 3, 1971
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
F-ZBBG
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
1025
YOM:
1970
Flight number:
Pélican 25
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The crew was engaged in a fire fighting in south Corsica. While conducting a scooping mission, the crew lost control of the airplane that crashed into the Gulf of Sagona. Both pilots, Mr. Patillaud & J. Lebel were killed. The airplane was operated under call sign Pélican 25.

Crash of a Boeing 307B-1 Stratoliner on Monte Renoso: 25 killed

Date & Time: Dec 29, 1962 at 1312 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
F-BELZ
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Bastia – Ajaccio – Nice
MSN:
2001
YOM:
1940
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
22
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
25
Captain / Total flying hours:
9865
Captain / Total hours on type:
3130.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
7388
Copilot / Total hours on type:
497
Aircraft flight hours:
41150
Circumstances:
The Boeing SA.307 Stratoliner F-BELZ arrived at Bastia (BIA), France from Nice (NCE) at 05:25 UTC. The plane took off again for the return flight via Ajaccio (AJA), Corsica at 11:49 and was cleared for a cruising altitude of FL120, estimating Ajaccio at 12:20 UTC. Last radio contact with the flight was at 12:09 when the flight crew replied to the weather and active runway information from Ajaccio Approach. At 12:12 the flight flew into a sheer rock face of Monte Renoso which is located 45 km from the Ajaccio VOR on the 048 radial. Impact was at an altitude of 2,285 m (7,500 feet) and about 50 m (165 feet) below the summit. The aircraft rebounded after impact and fell about 100 m down the slope of the mountain. All 25 occupants were killed, among them members of the Bastia Basketball team who were flying to Nice for the National Championship. The aircraft was totally destroyed.
Crew:
Roger Mercier, pilot,
Fernand Delime, copilot,
Antoine Blois, mechanic.
Probable cause:
The accident was attributed to a series of errors by the crew who:
- Made insufficient preparation for the flight and committed a serious error in estimating the duration of the flight,
- Failed to observe the cruising altitude entered on the flight plan,
- Failed to check properly the navigation of the aircraft which resulted in a wrong estimation of the position of the aircraft,
- Failed to maintain the safety altitude, and
- Started the descent prematurely, subsequently entering into instrument flight conditions.
The errors of the crew were made possible:
- By a lack of supervision of the flights on the part of the operator; and
- By a lack of correct route instructions for the segment Bastia-Ajaccio. The Board was led to conclude that the crew of F-BEIZ did not have the necessary instructions for the route via the turning point. Even supposing that the instructions supplied to the Board by the operator were issued before the accident, and that they were available to the pilot-in-command, the Board considered that these instructions were inaccurate and dangerous since they did not give the altitude at the turning point and they provided for a flight time between Bastia and Ajaccio which was incompatible with the attainment of safety altitudes.
- By a certain fatigue of the crew. Although the regulations concerning flight time limitations were strictly observed, it is worth mentioning that the flight activity of the crew was fairly strenuous during the three days preceding the accident.
Final Report:

Crash of a Vickers 610 Viking 1B off Tralicetu

Date & Time: Sep 5, 1959
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
F-BFDN
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Athens – Bastia
MSN:
248
YOM:
1948
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
While approaching the south coast of Corsica, the twin engine aircraft crashed in unknown circumstances into the sea off the village of Tralicetu. The aircraft sank and was lost while both pilots were able to swim to the beach.

Crash of a CAMS 53/1 off Ajaccio: 6 killed

Date & Time: Jan 21, 1936 at 1000 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
F-AJIR
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Marseille – Ajaccio – Tunis
MSN:
19
YOM:
1929
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Circumstances:
While descending to Ajaccio, the crew sent a short mayday message following a power plant failure. The seaplane aircraft went out of control and crashed into the sea, few km off shore. All six occupants were killed.
Crew:
Edmond Larbonne, pilot,
Laurent Caillebotte, radio navigator,
Robert Juge, engineer.
Probable cause:
Engine failure.

Crash of a CAMS 53/1 off Ajaccio

Date & Time: Dec 15, 1935
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
F-AJZX
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Algiers – Ajaccio – Marseille
MSN:
26
YOM:
1930
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On approach to Ajaccio, the seaplane crashed in unknown circumstances in the harbor of Ajaccio. All six occupants were rescued while the aircraft christened 'Saintonge' was lost.