Country

Crash of a De Havilland DH.84 Dragon near Gympie: 6 killed

Date & Time: Oct 1, 2012 at 1421 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-UXG
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Monto - Caboolture
MSN:
6077
YOM:
1934
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Captain / Total flying hours:
1134
Captain / Total hours on type:
662.00
Circumstances:
At about 1107 Eastern Standard Time on 01OCT2012, a de Havilland Aircraft Pty Ltd DH-84 Dragon, registered VH-UXG (UXG), took off from Monto on a private flight to Caboolture, Queensland under the visual flight rules (VFR). On board the aircraft were the pilot/owner and five passengers. The weather conditions on departure were reported to include a light south-easterly wind with a high overcast and good visibility. Sometime after about 1230, the aircraft was seen near Tansey, about 150 km north-west of Caboolture on the direct track from Monto to Caboolture. The aircraft was reported flying in a south-easterly direction at the time, at an estimated height of 3,000 ft and in fine but overcast conditions. At 1315, the pilot contacted Brisbane Radar air traffic control (ATC) and advised that the aircraft’s position was about 37 NM (69 km) north of Caboolture and requested navigation assistance. At 1318, the pilot advised ATC that the aircraft was in ‘full cloud’. For most of the remainder of the flight, the pilot and ATC exchanged communications, at times relayed through a commercial flight and a rescue flight in the area due to the limited ATC radio coverage in the area at low altitude. At about 1320, a friend of one of the aircraft’s passengers received a telephone call from the passenger to say that she was in an aircraft and that they were ‘lost in a cloud’ and kept losing altitude. Witnesses in the Borumba Dam, Imbil and Kandanga areas 70 to 80 km north-north-west of Caboolture later reported that they heard and briefly saw the aircraft flying in and out of low cloud between about 1315 and 1415. At 1348, the pilot advised ATC that the aircraft had about an hour’s endurance remaining. The pilot’s last recorded transmission was at 1404. A search for the aircraft was coordinated by Australian Search and Rescue (AusSAR). The aircraft wreckage was located on 3 October 2012, about 87 km north-west of Caboolture on the northern side of a steep, densely wooded ridge about 500 m above mean sea level (Figure 1). The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) later determined that the aircraft probably impacted terrain at about 1421 on 01OCT2012. Preliminary analysis indicated that the aircraft collided with trees and terrain at a moderate to high speed, with a left angle of bank. The aircraft’s direction of travel at impact was toward the south-south-west.

Crash of an IAI-1124 Westwind in Norfolk Island

Date & Time: Nov 18, 2009 at 2156 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-NGA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Apia - Norfolk - Melbourne
MSN:
387
YOM:
1983
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3596
Captain / Total hours on type:
923.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1954
Copilot / Total hours on type:
649
Aircraft flight hours:
21528
Aircraft flight cycles:
11867
Circumstances:
On 18 November 2009, the flight crew of an Israel Aircraft Industries Westwind 1124A aircraft, registered VH-NGA, was attempting a night approach and landing at Norfolk Island on an aeromedical flight from Apia, Samoa. On board were the pilot in command and copilot, and a doctor, nurse, patient and one passenger. On arrival, weather conditions prevented the crew from seeing the runway or its visual aids and therefore from landing. The pilot in command elected to ditch the aircraft in the sea before the aircraft’s fuel was exhausted. The aircraft broke in two after ditching. All the occupants escaped from the aircraft and were rescued by boat.
Probable cause:
The pilot in command did not plan the flight in accordance with the existing regulatory and operator requirements, precluding a full understanding and management of the potential hazards affecting the flight. The flight crew did not source the most recent Norfolk Island Airport forecast, or seek and apply other relevant weather and other information at the most relevant stage of the flight to fully inform their decision of whether to continue the flight to the island, or to divert to another destination. The flight crew’s delayed awareness of the deteriorating weather at Norfolk Island combined with incomplete flight planning to influence the decision to continue to the island, rather than divert to a suitable alternate.

Final Report:

Crash of a Gippsland GA8 Airvan in Australia: 1 killed

Date & Time: Oct 16, 2008 at 0945 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
VH-WRT
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Elcho Island-Mata Mata-Muthamul-Nyinyikay-Rurruwuy-Elcho Island
MSN:
GA8-05-005
YOM:
2001
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
1300
Captain / Total hours on type:
300.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4750
Circumstances:
While cruising at 4,500 feet over Buckingham Bay, the aircraft lost altitude and crashed. Some debris were found the day after but not the pilot who is believed to die.
Probable cause:
Following a review of the available evidence covering:
• witness information,
• the pilot's fatigue and health,
• the airworthiness of the aircraft,
• aircraft fuel,
• the weather affecting the flight, and
• the aircraft’s loading and weight and balance,
the investigation was unable to identify any factors that may have contributed to the accident.
From the evidence available, the following findings are made with respect to the missing aircraft at Buckingham Bay, Northern Territory on 16 October 2008 involving Gippsland Aeronautics GA-8 Airvan aircraft, registered VH-WRT. They should not be read as apportioning blame or liability to any organisation or individual.
No contributing safety factors were identified.
Other safety factors:
• The main vertical net and the throwover net were not used to restrain the cargo.
• The full jerry cans were not secured in the aircraft cabin.
• At the time of departure, the aircraft’s centre of gravity (c.g) was probably to the rear of the permitted c.g limit that was published in the Aircraft Flight Manual.
• There was no record that the pilot lodged a flight notification for the flight with Airservices Australia.

Crash of a Rockwell Shrike Commander 500S off Norfolk Island: 1 killed

Date & Time: Sep 11, 1984
Operator:
Registration:
N9031N
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Pago Pago – Norfolk Island – Sydney
MSN:
500-1867-43
YOM:
1969
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
After takeoff from Norfolk Island Airport, while climbing, the twin engine aircraft lost height and crashed into the sea. The pilot, sole on board, was killed.

Crash of a Rockwell Aero Commander 685 in the Bass Strait: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jul 17, 1983 at 1505 LT
Operator:
Registration:
VH-WJC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Hobart - Melbourne
MSN:
685-12005
YOM:
1972
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
On 17 July 1983 the pilot of Rockwell (Aero Commander) 685 aircraft VH-WJC submitted a flight plan to the Hobart Briefing Office for a private category flight from Hobart to Moorabbin, tracking via Launceston and Wonthaggi. The plan indicated that the flight would be conducted under the Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) at Flight Level 120 (12 000 feet altitude on standard atmospheric pressure of 1013.2 millibars), with two persons on board. The flight plan showed that the aircraft had a fuel endurance of 220 minutes, and carried an Emergency Locator Beacon (ELB) and life jackets. There was no indication that a life raft was carried. The aircraft departed Hobart at 1352 hours and, thereafter, the pilot made the appropriate radio reports to Hobart Tower, Launceston Control and Launceston Tower. The flight apparently progressed normally until 1452 hours when the pilot advised Launceston Control, "Er Whiskey Juliet Charlie we seem to have been in trouble with er fuel here the red er warning light comes on and the gauge is down . . .".At 1454 hours the pilot transmitted a Mayday call, indicating that he was descending from Flight Level 120 on track to Bass (a position reporting point), present position was 85 nautical miles (nm) from Launceston and he would be making a controlled ditching. Launceston Control immediately initiated the Distress phase of the Search and Rescue procedures and advised the Melbourne Operational Control Centre (OCC). Further communications between the aircraft and Launceston Control indicated that the aircraft was continuing descent on track towards Wonthaggi. The last position report from the pilot, at 1500 hours, was 94 nm from Wonthaggi. The last recorded transmission from the aircraft was at 1501 hours when the pilot confirmed that there were two persons on board. There were no indications at any time from the pilot that the fuel supply had been exhausted or that either engine had failed. It was estimated that the aircraft ditched at about 1505 hours, at an approximate position of 81 nm from Wonthaggi on the planned track. No trace of the aircraft nor both occupants was found.
Probable cause:
Due to lack of evidences, the exact cause of the accident could not be determined.
Final Report:

Crash of a Lockheed L-414 Hudson I into Bass Strait: 5 killed

Date & Time: Jul 6, 1943
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
A16-32
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Sale - Sale
MSN:
414-1883
YOM:
1940
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
The aircraft took off at 1944LT to carry out practice DR9. This practice was a night flight from Base-Flinders-Currie-Hogan Group-Base. The aircraft was on wireless silence and failed to return. The maximum endurance of the aircraft was 7 hours. The aircraft failed to return and all searches have proved negative.
Crew:
P/O John James Bowman, pilot,
P/O Alan Joseph Malone, navigator,
P/O Harry Robert Alfred Guymer, wireless operator and air gunner,
P/O Alexander Frederick McDonald, wireless operator and air gunner,
P/O John Alexander Buchanan, air gunner.
Source: http://www.adf-gallery.com.au/

Crash of a Martin B-26 Marauder in Australia

Date & Time: Sep 30, 1942 at 1200 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
40-1403
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
1403
YOM:
1940
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
8
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Following an uneventful mission and landing, crew evacuate the runway to rich his parking place. While rolling on taxiway, aircraft became uncontrollable, run down an embankment and came to rest in a ravine. All eight crew were uninjured as the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Lockheed 18-40-11 LodeStar off Queensland: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jul 14, 1942
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-CAD
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Townsville – Cooktown
MSN:
2109
YOM:
1941
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
The crew was performing a flight from Townsville to Cooktownn when the twin engine aircraft crashed in unknown circumstances into the sea off Queensland. No trace of the aircraft nor the crew was ever found.

Crash of a De Havilland DH.89A Dragon Rapide into the Bass Strait: 4 killed

Date & Time: May 29, 1942
Operator:
Registration:
VH-UXZ
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Melbourne - Flinders Island
MSN:
6365
YOM:
1937
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
The aircraft christened 'Marika' was performing a schedule flight from Melbourne to the Flinders Island. En route, while cruising over the Bass Strait, an engine failed. The pilot attempted to ditch the aircraft that crashed into the sea and was lost. SAR operations were suspended after few days as no trace of the aircraft nor the occupant was found. An engine was eventually found fifty years later.
Probable cause:
Engine failure may be caused by fuel starvation.

Crash of a De Havilland DH.60M Moth in Australia

Date & Time: Nov 24, 1938
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
A7-68
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
1361
YOM:
1929
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The single engine aircraft crashed in unknown circumstances somewhere in Australia. Both pilots were injured while the aircraft was destroyed.
Crew:
P. McDonough, instructor pilot,
J. Costello, student pilot.