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Crash of a Cessna 421C Golden Eagle III in Monterey: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jul 13, 2021 at 1045 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N678SW
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Monterey – Salinas
MSN:
421C-1023
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from Monterey Airport runway 10R, while climbing, the pilot reported problems and elected to return. Shortly later, the aircraft entered an uncontrolled descent and crashed on a house located 2 km south of the airfield, bursting into flames. The aircraft was totally destroyed and the pilot, sole on board, was killed. There were no injuries on the ground.

Crash of a Piper PA-31-310 Navajo off Monterey

Date & Time: Apr 14, 1999 at 1800 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N141CM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Honolulu – Long Beach
MSN:
31-234
YOM:
1968
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
427
Captain / Total hours on type:
42.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4882
Circumstances:
The pilot reported that about 150 miles southwest of Monterey, the right engine made unusual noises, began to run rough, and exhibited high cylinder head temperature at the limits of the gauge. He advised Oakland Center of his position and situation, but did not declare an emergency. The pilot attempted to open the right engine cowl flap; however, it malfunctioned. He then increased fuel flow to the right engine in order to cool it and eventually had to reduce power on that side to keep it running. To compensate for the power loss in the right engine, he had to add power to the left engine. The combination of remedial actions increased the fuel consumption beyond his planned fuel burn rate. The flight attitude required by the asymmetric power also induced a periodic unporting condition in the outboard fuel tank pickups. The pilot said he was forced to switch to the inboard tanks until that supply was exhausted and then attempted to feed from the outboard tanks. The pilot said he was unsuccessful in maintaining consistent engine power output and was forced to ditch 20 miles short of the coastline. The pilot's VFR flight plan indicated that the total time en route would be 13 hours 10 minutes and total fuel onboard was 14 hours. The lapsed time from departure until the aircraft ditching was approximately 13 hours 12 minutes.
Probable cause:
An undetermined system malfunction in the right engine, which led to an increase in fuel usage beyond the pilot's planned fuel consumption rate and eventual fuel supply exhaustion.
Final Report:

Crash of a Socata TBM-700 in South Lake Tahoe

Date & Time: Aug 22, 1992 at 1303 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N339W
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Monterey - South Lake Tahoe
MSN:
39
YOM:
1992
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
845
Captain / Total hours on type:
50.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
246
Aircraft flight hours:
94
Circumstances:
According to the aircraft occupants, the aircraft owner, who holds a commercial pilot and cfi certificates, was occupying the right front seat. A friend of the pilot, a 246 hour private pilot with no experience in high performance turbine powered aircraft, was in the left seat and flying the aircraft under the direction of the owner. While on a straight in approach to the airport, the flight was advised three times by the atct of a variable right cross wind from 200 to 220° at speeds from 8 to 14 knots, with higher gust components. The tower also advised the flight of reports of light to moderate turbulence all the way to the ground. Both pilots reported that the aircraft had just touched down on runway 18 when a sudden cross wind gust lifted the right wing. The private pilot did not correct the situation and the aircraft owner could not overpower the other pilots control inputs in time to correct for the wind gust. The left wing tip drug the ground and the aircraft cartwheeled off the left side of the runway and into an airport fence.
Probable cause:
The failure of both pilots to adequately anticipate and compensate for the variable cross wind condition, and, the pilot in command's inadequate supervision of the flight. A factor in the accident was the left seat pilot's limited total experience and experience in high performance aircraft types.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II in Monterey: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jun 24, 1992 at 1030 LT
Registration:
N628RJ
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Monterey - Tucson
MSN:
421B-0028
YOM:
1970
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
75
Captain / Total hours on type:
10.00
Circumstances:
The 3 occupants aboard were: the owner in the left front seat, his wife in the right front seat, and a man hired by the owner to fly the airplane (seat location could not be determined). Prior to takeoff a man telephoned FSS for a weather briefing and to file an IFR flight plan. He told FSS the pilot's name was J. Hamlett; a J. Hamlett was not aboard (it was found later that Hamlett was the maiden name of the wife of the man hired to fly the airplane). Two minutes after takeoff the pilot was told to contact departure; the pilot acknowledged. This was the last recorded radio contact. The airplane collided with a hill obscured by ground fog about 3 miles east of the airport. The man hired to fly the airplane did not possess an airman certificate; his certificate was revoked 2 years prior to the accident. The owner had obtained his private certificate for airplane single-engine land about 1 month prior to the accident, and had not received any multi-engine instruction. All three occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
The owner/pilot's poor judgement in attempting an operation beyond his experience and ability, which resulted in his failure to attain an adequate climb profile necessary for terrain clearance. Also, the owner/pilot lacked instrument experience, and was overconfident in his ability. Factors in the accident were: the hilly terrain and weather conditions.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 340A off Monterey

Date & Time: Jan 2, 1983 at 1720 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N1947E
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Monterey – Oakland
MSN:
340A-0677
YOM:
1978
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3200
Captain / Total hours on type:
41.00
Circumstances:
The aircraft began to lose power at about 400 feet agl after takeoff and the pilot elected to land along the shoreline in the ocean. The aircraft ditched about 100 yards off shore. All 4 occupants were able to exit thru the airstair door and received only minor injuries. The aircraft sank after about 5 minutes. It was not recovered from the 27 feet deep water. Two occupants swam ashore and two were rescued by the coast guard. The line attendant who serviced the aircraft mistook it for a king air. The pilot requested that all four tanks be topped off. The line attendant added 110 gallons of Jet A fuel.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: loss of engine power(partial) - mechanical failure/malfunction
Phase of operation: takeoff - initial climb
Findings
1. (c) fluid,fuel grade - improper
2. (c) maintenance,service of aircraft/equipment - improper - airport personnel
3. (c) aircraft service - inattentive - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #2: ditching
Phase of operation: landing - flare/touchdown
Final Report:

Crash of a Lockheed L-188C Electra in Ardmore: 83 killed

Date & Time: Apr 22, 1966 at 2030 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N183H
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Monterey - Ardmore - Columbus
MSN:
1136
YOM:
1961
Flight number:
AFA280D
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
93
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
83
Captain / Total flying hours:
16247
Captain / Total hours on type:
1247.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
12355
Copilot / Total hours on type:
1155
Aircraft flight hours:
4019
Circumstances:
The aircraft departed Monterey Airport, California, on a charter flight to Columbus, Georgia, with an intermediate stop at Ardmore Municipal Airport, Oklahoma, carrying 93 US soldiers and a crew of five on behalf of the Military Air Command. Following an uneventful flight from Monterey, the crew started the descent to Ardmore Municipal Airport by night and marginal weather conditions. An ADF instrument approach to runway 08 was abandoned and the crew decided to follow a visual approach to runway 30. While descending to runway 30 in poor visibility, the captain (also PIC) suffered a heart attack. The aircraft commenced an uncontrolled descent slightly banked to the right until it struck the ground and disintegrated about 1,5 mile short of runway 30. All five crew members and 75 passengers were killed while 18 others were seriously injured. Few hours later, three of the survivors died from their injuries.
Probable cause:
The Board determined the probable cause of this accident was the incapacitation, due to a coronary insufficiency, of the pilot-in-command at a critical point during visual, circling approach being conducted under instrument flight conditions. The Board was concerned by the fact that the pilot-in-command has an established medical history of cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus, both of which are disqualifying for the issuance of a first-class medical certificate, and that he deliberately falsified his application for this certificate.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft SNB-2 Navigator on Mt Cajon: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jan 9, 1955
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
67260
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Monterey - Norton
MSN:
5091
YOM:
1942
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
The aircraft was completing a flight from Monterey to Norton AFB in San Bernardino, carrying a crew of two and a sailor passenger, fireman of the USS Badoeng Strait. While cruising by night at an altitude of 5,000 feet, the airplane hit the slope of Mt Cajon located south of Cajon Pass. The wreckage was found four days later, on January 13. The aircraft was destroyed and all three occupants have been killed.
Crew:
Lt Marshall Hand, pilot,
Lt Lasley K. Lacewell Jr., copilot.
Passenger:
Haskel Lewis Reichbach.

Crash of a Douglas C-49K near Vail: 21 killed

Date & Time: Sep 1, 1953 at 1830 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N19941
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Fort Ord - McChord
MSN:
6333
YOM:
1942
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
19
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
21
Captain / Total flying hours:
3935
Captain / Total hours on type:
1000.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
2085
Copilot / Total hours on type:
500
Aircraft flight hours:
8398
Circumstances:
The aircraft was performing a special flight from Fort Ord AFB (Monterey) to McChord AFB, carrying 19 military passengers and two pilots. En route, the crew cancelled the IFR flight plan and continued under VFR in poor weather conditions. At an altitude of 2,600 feet in foggy conditions, the aircraft hit the slope of a mountain, was totally destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire and all 21 occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
The Board finds that the probable cause of this accident was the pilot’s attempt to continue flight under the provisions of Visual Flight Rules during instrument conditions. The following findings were pointed out:
- All ground radio facilities were functioning normally,
- An instrument flight plan had been cancelled and the flight was proceeding in accordance with visual flight rules,
- The crash occurred during daylight on a fog-covered hillside at an altitude of about 2,600 feet MSL,
- The crash site was on the airway and the direction of impact was near the on-course heading.
Final Report: