Crash of an Avro 652 Anson C.19 in Hendon: 3 killed

Date & Time: Nov 21, 1952
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VM327
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Hendon – Saint Athan
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from Hendon Airfield, while in initial climb, the crew informed ground that the right engine failed and elected to return for an emergency landing. The aircraft lost height and hit tree tops before crashing in a wooded area. All three crew members were killed.
Probable cause:
Engine failure.

Crash of an Avro 652 Anson C.19 in RAF Hendon: 2 killed

Date & Time: Feb 9, 1948
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
TX168
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Hendon - Hendon
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
On final approach to RAF Hendon, while performing a local training sortie, the aircraft stalled and hit several buildings located 1'100 yards short of the runway threshold. On impact, the aircraft nosed down and crashed on a trolleybus. Both pilots were killed while eight civilians seating in the trolleybus were seriously injured.
Probable cause:
It appears that the crew completed the final approach with an engine voluntarily inoperative. Due to an insufficient approach speed, the aircraft stalled and crashed. Following this accident, training flights with engine shut down will be prohibited at RAF Hendon and will be operated at RAF Bassingbourn.

Crash of a Consolidated B-24C Liberator II off Gibraltar: 16 killed

Date & Time: Jul 4, 1943 at 2307 LT
Operator:
Registration:
AL523
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Gibraltar - Hendon
Region:
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
11
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
16
Circumstances:
The Captain Eduard Prchal, the only survivor, confirmed he received the green light from the tower and began the night take-off roll. He pulled the stick back and the aircraft started to climb. At an altitude of 150 feet, he pushed the controls of the aircraft forward to gain speed when he discovered he was unable to pull the stick back. The steering mechanism was jammed or locked. The aircraft then lost height rapidly. The Captain closed the four throttles and warned the others through the intercom "Attention, crash". The aircraft crashed into the sea 16 seconds after take off. The Captain was the only survivor as all 16 other occupants were killed, among them the Polish General and Prime Minister Władysław Sikorski, his daughter Zofia and his Chief of Staff, the Major General Tadeusz Klimecki. The crew was from the 511th Squadron.
Passengers:
Col Victor Cazalet,
Jan Gralewski,
Maj Gen Tadeusz Klimecki,
Adj Adam Kułakowski,
Zofia Leśniowska,
Walter Heathcote Lock,
Col Andrzej Marecki,
Adj Harry Pinder,
Lt Józef Ponikiewski,
Gen Władysław Sikorski
Brig John Percival Whiteley.
Probable cause:
A British Court of Inquiry convened on 7 July 1943 to investigate the crash, following the order by Air Marshal Sir John Slessor of 5 July 1943. On 25 July 1943 the Court concluded that the accident was caused by the "jamming of elevator controls" which led to the aircraft being uncontrollable after take-off. The report noted that "it has not been possible to determine how the jamming occurred" although it ruled out sabotage. Slessor was not satisfied with the report and on 28 July ordered the Court to continue its investigation to find out whether the controls were indeed jammed or not, and if they were, then for what reason. Despite further investigation the Court was unable to resolve Slessor's doubts. The Polish government refused to endorse this report because of the contradictions cited therein, and the lack of conclusive findings.

Crash of a Lockheed 12 Electra Junior on Mt Low Water Tarn: 3 killed

Date & Time: Oct 14, 1942
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
LA622
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Ayr – Hendon
MSN:
1277
YOM:
1942
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
En route to Hendon, the twin engine aircraft hit the slope of Mt Low Water Tarn located near Coniston, Cumbria. All three occupants were killed, two pilots from the American manufacturer Lockheed and an Inspector of the Royal Air Force.
Crew:
George Werner Bransom, pilot.
Osbourne R. Keith, pilot.
Passenger:
F/O George Bevil Grenfell.

Crash of a Lockheed L-414 Hudson in Llanfair: 13 killed

Date & Time: Jul 20, 1942
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N7253
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Sydenham - Hendon
MSN:
414-1649
YOM:
1940
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
10
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
13
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft was performing a flight from RAF Sydenham (Belfast City) to RAF Hendon (Middlesex) with ten VIP passengers and a crew of three on board. While cruising over Wales in poor weather conditions, the aircraft went out of control, dove into the ground and crashed in a pasture located in Llanfair, near Ruthin. All thirteen occupants were killed. It appears at the time of the accident, there was stormy weather with turbulence and it seems the aircraft went out of control after being striked by lightning.
Probable cause:
Aircraft went out of control while flying in thunderstorm activity and may have been struck by lightning.

Crash of a De Havilland DH.89A Dragon Rapide near Dalmellington

Date & Time: Apr 20, 1942
Operator:
Registration:
BD143
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
6344
YOM:
1936
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
En route, an engine failed, forcing the pilot to attempt an emergency landing. While approaching a field located in Breston Farm, near Dalmellington, the aircraft hit the ground so violently that the tail was sheared off. The aircraft came to rest and was damaged beyond repair while all eight occupants escaped slightly injured.
Probable cause:
Engine failure.

Ground accident of a De Havilland DH.89A Dragon Rapide in RAF Hendon

Date & Time: Apr 11, 1942
Operator:
Registration:
W6456
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
6342
YOM:
1936
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
While taxiing for departure, the aircraft's left tyre burst. The aircraft went out of control, veered off taxiway and came to rest. While all six occupants were unhurt, the aircraft was no repaired.
Probable cause:
Tyre burst.

Crash of a De Havilland DH.89A Dragon Rapide in Yoxall

Date & Time: Mar 25, 1941
Operator:
Registration:
R9551
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
6479
YOM:
1940
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew was performing a ferry flight from RAF Hendon. En route, he encountered bad weather conditions and attempted to make an emergency landing. Both pilots were unhurt while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a De Havilland DH.80 Puss Moth in Tewkesbury

Date & Time: Apr 5, 1940
Operator:
Registration:
G-ABSO
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Hendon – Aston Down
MSN:
2217
YOM:
1932
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew was performing a flight from RAF Hendon to RAF Asont Down on behalf of the 24th Squadron. En route, the engine failed, forcing the pilot to attempt an emergency landing in a field located in Tewkesbury. Both occupants escaped unhurt while the aircraft was considered as written off.
Probable cause:
Engine failure.