Crash of a Piaggio P.180 Avanti in Flint

Date & Time: Nov 16, 2011 at 0940 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N168SL
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Detroit - West Bend
MSN:
1139
YOM:
2007
Flight number:
VNR168
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3851
Captain / Total hours on type:
2023.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4422
Circumstances:
During climb to cruise, the captain increased left engine power and the engine power lever became jammed in the full forward position. This condition resulted in an engine overtorque and overtemperture condition, and the captain shut down the left engine. After the engine shutdown, both primary flight display screens went blank. The captain reset the right generator and the flight displays regained power and display. Due to the engine shutdown, the captain diverted to a nearby airport and attempted a single-engine precautionary landing in visual flight rules conditions. Based on wind conditions at the airport (290 degrees at 18 knots), runway 27 was being used for operations. During the descent, the crew became confused as to their true heading and were only able to identify runway 27 about a minute before touching down due to a 50-degree difference in heading indications displayed to the crew as a result of the instrument gyros having been reset. Accurate heading information would have been available to the crew had they referenced the airplane’s compass. Having declared an emergency, the crew was cleared to land on any runway and chose to land on runway 18. After touchdown, the captain applied reverse thrust on the right engine and the airplane veered to the right. The airplane flight manual’s single-engine approach and landing checklist indicates that after landing braking and reverse thrust are to be used as required to maintain airplane control. The airplane continued to the right, departed the runway surface, impacted terrain, flipped over, and came to rest inverted. At the point of touchdown, there was about 5,000 feet of runway remaining for the landing roll. The loss of directional control was likely initiated when the captain applied reverse thrust shortly after touchdown, and was likely aggravated by the strong crosswind. Postaccident examination of the airplane showed a clevis pin incorrectly installed by unknown maintenance personnel that resulted in a jammed left engine power lever. No additional anomalies were noted with the airplane or engines that would have precluded normal operation.
Probable cause:
The captain's failure to maintain directional control during landing with one engine inoperative. Contributing to the accident was an improperly installed clevis pin in the left engine power lever, the crew’s delay in accurately identifying their heading, and their subsequent selection of a runway with a strong crosswind.
Final Report:

Crash of a Rockwell Sabreliner 75A in Iron Wood: 2 killed

Date & Time: Aug 14, 2000 at 1822 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N85DW
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Brainerd – Flint
MSN:
380-27
YOM:
1975
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
13037
Captain / Total hours on type:
2560.00
Aircraft flight hours:
7185
Circumstances:
The airplane impacted heavily wooded terrain after experiencing a dual engine failure due to a reported lightning strike. The pilot received a weather brief that included information concerning a Convective Sigmet and a Severe Weather Watch. The weather briefer informed the pilot that a route to the southeast would keep the flight out of the heavy weather, and that, "... you'll get clobbered if you go due east." After departure, the pilot requested a turn to the northeast to stay clear of weather. While in the climb, the flight was advised of a Weather Watch that covered the area of their flight. The CVR revealed that Continuous Ignition was not selected prior to encountering turbulence. About 23 minutes after takeoff, the airplane was climbing at about 30,800 feet msl when the pilot reported a dual engine failure due to a lightning strike. The CVR indicated one engine quit and the second quit about two seconds later. The copilot established a 170 kts descent airspeed for "best glide." The airplane was vectored near a level 5 thunderstorm during the emergency descent. Two air starts were attempted when the airplane's altitude was outside of the air start envelope. Two more air starts were attempted within the air start envelope but were unsuccessful. The minimum airspeed for an air restart is 160 kts and the maximum speed for air start is 358 kts. The CVR indicated that the pilots did not call for the airplane's checklist, and no challenge and response checklists were used during the emergency descent. The CVR indicated the pilots did not discuss load shedding any of the electrical components on the airplane. The CVR indicated the hydraulic system cycled twice during the emergency descent and the landing gear was lowered using the hydraulic system during descent. During the descent the pilots reported they had lost use of their navigation equipment. The airplane impacted the terrain located about 166 nautical miles from the departure airport on a bearing of 083 degrees. No preexisting engines or airframe anomalies were found.
Probable cause:
The pilot's improper in-flight decision, the pilot's continued flight into known adverse weather, the pilot's failure to turn on the continuous ignition in turbulence, and the pilot's failure to follow the procedures for an airstart. Factors included the thunderstorms, the lightning strike, and the woods.
Final Report:

Crash of a Dassault Falcon 10 in Detroit

Date & Time: Jan 24, 1996 at 1018 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N191MC
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Philadelphia - Flint
MSN:
30
YOM:
1974
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
11163
Captain / Total hours on type:
1330.00
Aircraft flight hours:
9829
Circumstances:
The pilot reported getting an unsafe indication on the right main landing gear when the landing gear was lowered. The crew recycled the landing gear and got the same unsafe indication. The crew retracted the gear and diverted to Detroit. On arrival, the crew performed the 'landing gear abnormal extension checklist,' but the unsafe indication remained. The air traffic control tower reported that the gear appeared normal. During the landing, the right main landing gear retracted. The airplane slid sideways, striking a runway marker as it departed the runway, and came to rest in a field. Examination revealed that the right landing gear downlock mechanism could be overcome with physical force. Examination of the right landing gear actuator revealed that one of the six shims which separate the spacers and help guide the safety lock switch was out of position and lying on top of the lock assembly.
Probable cause:
Failure of the right landing gear locking mechanism.
Final Report:

Crash of a Swearingen SA226AT Merlin IV in Detroit

Date & Time: Dec 15, 1995 at 0423 LT
Registration:
N31AT
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Flint - Louisville
MSN:
AT-057
YOM:
1977
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
9550
Captain / Total hours on type:
3977.00
Aircraft flight hours:
6965
Circumstances:
The pilot reported that shortly after takeoff, the airplane's left engine started to surge. The airplane also began experiencing intermittent electrical surges which caused the instrument panel lights, cabin lights, and radios to go off and on. The pilot diverted to an alternate airport to land. He did not secure the left engine before landing because it was still developing some usable power. He placed the gear select handle in the down position and observed three green gear-down-and-locked lights. Prior to touchdown, both power levers were positioned to flight idle and no gear warning horn sounded. The airplane landed gear up. Postaccident examination revealed no abnormalities with the landing gear or electrical system. The landing gear emergency extension functioned properly. The landing gear indicating system showed a safe gear indication when the gear was extended during examination. Substantial damage to the gear doors was observed, but no damage to the landing gear was observed.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to extend the landing gear. A factor in the accident was the pilot's diverted attention.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-46-310P Malibu in Lakeville: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jun 26, 1990 at 1616 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N315RC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Flint – Akron
MSN:
46-8508044
YOM:
1985
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
983
Captain / Total hours on type:
197.00
Aircraft flight hours:
710
Circumstances:
During IFR departure, pilot received progressive altitude clearances to climb to 15,000 feet. At 1607 edt, he was vectored for 'a good rate of climb' thru 14,000 feet with clearance to proceed on course after leveling 14,000 feet for 15,000 feet. Radar data indicated a steady climb til aircraft was above 13,000 feet. As it climbed from 13,300 feet to 13,900 fet (max recorded altitude), its speed slowed from about 115 knots to below 80 knots. At 1613 edt, pilot was cleared to proceed direct and change frequency. Radar data showed that after reaching 13,900 feet, aircraft deviated from course and entered steep descent. Radar contact was lost and inflight breakup occurred. Pieces of wings and stabilizers were found up to 1.5 mile from fuselage. Trajectory study disclosed breakup occurred between 6,000 feet and 9,000 feet msl. Exam of fractures on major components revealed characteristics typical of overstress; no preexisting cracks were found. No autopilot failure or bird strike was found. Clouds were layered to 20,000 feet; freezing level was about 12,500 feet. There was evidence aircraft was in or near convective precipitation above freezing level for about 1.5 minute before rapid descent. Found Pitot heat switch 'off' and induction air door in its primary position. The pilot, sole on board, was killed.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to use the airplane's ice protection equipment, which resulted in a performance loss due to induction icing, propeller icing, or both, while flying in convective instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) at and above the freezing level. The performance loss led to a stall, the recovery from which probably was exacerbated by the pilot's improper response to erroneous airspeed indications that resulted from blockage of the pitot tube by atmospheric icing.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft E18S in Youngstown

Date & Time: Apr 10, 1979 at 1442 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N617M
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Flint - Youngstown
MSN:
BA-322
YOM:
1957
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
1369
Captain / Total hours on type:
106.00
Circumstances:
For unknown reasons, the twin engine airplane landed hard and bounced. It went out of control and crashed. The pilot, sole on board, was uninjured.
Probable cause:
Controlled collision with ground following an improper level off. The following contributing factors were reported.
- Improper recovery from bounced landing,
- Touch and go landing,
- Aircraft porpoised.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft D18S in Flint

Date & Time: Nov 3, 1978 at 0427 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N80369
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Saint Louis - Flint
MSN:
A-157
YOM:
1946
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2391
Captain / Total hours on type:
247.00
Circumstances:
Following a normal landing and braking procedure at Flint-Bishop Airport, while performing a cargo flight from St Louis, the pilot vacated the runway and rolled to the apron with he collided with a parked Piper PA-28-140 registered N54393. The pilot was uninjured while both aircraft were destroyed by a post crash fire.
Probable cause:
Ground collision with a parked aircraft after the pilot failed to see and avoid other aircraft. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Taxied without proper ground assistance,
- Windshield dirty,
- Fog,
- Restricted vision.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft D18S in Pontiac: 2 killed

Date & Time: Mar 14, 1978 at 0413 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N427Q
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Flint - Pontiac
MSN:
A-336
YOM:
1947
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
5443
Captain / Total hours on type:
421.00
Circumstances:
The twin engine airplane was completing a cargo flight from Flint to Pontiac. While descending to Pontiac-Oakland County Airport by night, the pilot encountered bad weather conditions when on final, the airplane went out of control and crashed in White Lake, about three miles west of the airport. The aircraft was destroyed and both occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Uncontrolled descent on finale approach due to windshear. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Turbulences associated with clouds and thunderstorm activity,
- Visibility two miles or less,
- Fog,
- IFR conditions,
- Local residents reported tornado like winds in area.
Final Report:

Crash of a Learjet 25B in Sanford: 5 killed

Date & Time: Sep 8, 1977 at 2020 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N999HG
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Sanford - Flint
MSN:
25-178
YOM:
1974
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
9364
Aircraft flight hours:
700
Circumstances:
About 2020 EST, on September 8, 1977, Champion Home Builders Company, Gates Learjet 25B, N999HG, crashed shortly after takeoff at Sanford, North Carolina. All five persons aboard were killed, and the aircraft was destroyed. The aircraft departed Sanford Airport about 2018 EST, for a flight to Flint, Michigan. In accordance with departure instructions from Fayetteville departure control, the flight was about 3 mi west of the airport, climbing through 3,000 ft, on a heading of 270°, when it disappeared from radar. There were no distress calls, but several witnesses west of the airport saw the aircraft on fire below the 600 feet suddenly dove to the ground. People in the immediate vicinity reported that the overcast ceiling. The flight completed a right turn to a northeasterly heading and aircraft was on fire before it crashed.
Probable cause:
The National Transportation Safety Board determines that the probable cause of this accident was one or more low-order explosions in the aircraft's aft fuselage determine conclusively the fuel and ignition sources of the initial explosion; which resulted in a fire and loss of control capability. The Safety Board could not however, gases from the aircraft's batteries or fuel leakage from fuel system components, or both, could have been present in the area of the initial explosion.
Final Report:

Crash of a Learjet 23 in Flint: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jan 6, 1977 at 1912 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N332PC
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Detroit - Flint
MSN:
23-056
YOM:
1965
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
18320
Captain / Total hours on type:
1648.00
Circumstances:
The approach to Flint-Bishop Airport runway 27 was completed in poor weather conditions with limited visibility due to snow falls. On final, the airplane stalled then rolled to the right to an angle of 45° and crashed in flames. The aircraft was destroyed and both pilots were killed. They were completing a cargo flight from Detroit-Willow Run (Ypsilanti) Airport.
Probable cause:
Stall on final approach after the crew failed to maintain flying speed. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Failed to initiate go-around,
- Improper operation of flight controls,
- ATC issued improper or conflicting instructions,
- Lack of familiarity with aircraft,
- Poorly planned approach,
- Pilot had limited recent jet experience,
- Vectored and cleared for ILS back course 3NM southeast of middle marker.
Final Report: