Crash of a Cessna 441 Conquest II in Cape Town: 5 killed

Date & Time: Aug 16, 2015 at 0650 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
V5-NRS
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Windhoek - Cape Town
MSN:
441-0288
YOM:
1983
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
On final approach to Cape Town Airport in marginal weather conditions, the twin engine aircraft hit the slope of Mt Tygerberg located about 5 km from the runway 19 threshold. The crew was completing an ambulance flight from Windhoek-Eros Airport when the accident occurred. The aircraft was destroyed by impact forces and post crash fire and all five occupants (two pilots, a nurse, a patient and his daughter) were killed. At the time of the accident, a traffic radar at Cape Town Airport was out of order due to a technical problem. As well, the visibility was poor due to marginal weather conditions.

Crash of a Cessna 441 Conquest II in Denton: 1 killed

Date & Time: Feb 4, 2015 at 2109 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N441TG
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Willmar - Denton
MSN:
441-200
YOM:
1981
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
4935
Aircraft flight hours:
3830
Circumstances:
The instrument-rated commercial pilot was approaching the destination airport after a cross country flight in night instrument meteorological conditions. According to radar track data and air traffic control communications, while receiving radar vectors to the final approach course, the pilot did not always immediately comply with assigned headings and, on several occasions, allowed the airplane to descend below assigned altitudes. According to airplane performance calculations based on radar track and GPS data, the pilot made an engine power reduction about 2.5 minutes before the accident as he maneuvered toward the final approach fix. Following the engine power reduction, the airplane's airspeed decreased from 162 to 75 knots calibrated airspeed, and the angle of attack increased from 2.7° to 14°. About 4 miles from the final approach fix, the airplane descended below the specified minimum altitude for that segment of the instrument approach. The tower controller subsequently alerted the pilot of the airplane's low altitude, and the pilot replied that he would climb. At the time of the altitude alert, the airplane was 500 ft below the specified minimum altitude of 2,000 ft mean sea level. According to airplane performance calculations, 5 seconds after the tower controller told the pilot to check his altitude, the pilot made an abrupt elevator-up input that further decreased airspeed, and the airplane entered an aerodynamic stall. A witness saw the airplane abruptly transition from a straight-and-level flight attitude to a nose-down, steep left bank, vertical descent toward the ground, consistent with the stall. Additionally, a review of security camera footage established that the airplane had transitioned from a wings-level descent to a near vertical spiraling descent. A post accident examination of the airplane did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation during the accident flight. Although the pilot had monocular vision following a childhood injury that resulted in very limited vision in his left eye, he had passed a medical flight test and received a Statement of Demonstrated Ability. The pilot had flown for several decades with monocular vision and, as such, his lack of binocular depth perception likely did not impede his ability to monitor the cockpit instrumentation during the accident flight. The pilot had recently purchased the airplane, and records indicated that he had obtained make and model specific training about 1 month before the accident and had flown the airplane about 10 hours before the accident flight. The pilot's instrument proficiency and night currency could not be determined from the available records; therefore, it could not be determined whether a lack of recent instrument or night experience contributed to the pilot's difficulty in maintaining control of the airplane.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain adequate airspeed during the instrument approach in night instrument meteorological conditions, which resulted in the airplane exceeding its critical angle of attack and an aerodynamic stall/spin at a low altitude.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 441 Conquest II in Battle Creek

Date & Time: Mar 27, 2012 at 0730 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N1212C
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Muskegon - Aurora
MSN:
441-0346
YOM:
1984
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
20154
Captain / Total hours on type:
13000.00
Circumstances:
After the pilot finished the preflight inspection in the hangar, the maintenance technician pulled the airplane out of the hangar and connected the auxiliary power cart to the airplane. Shortly thereafter, the pilot boarded the airplane and proceeded with the normal checklist. The pilot signaled to the maintenance technician to disconnect the power cart. The maintenance technician subsequently signaled that the pilot was clear to start the engines. After departure, the pilot noted a problem with the landing gear, and, after establishing that the tow bar was, most likely, still attached to the nosewheel, he diverted to a nearby airport for a precautionary landing. During the landing, the nose landing gear collapsed and the primary structure in the nose of the airplane was substantially damaged.
Probable cause:
The maintenance technician did not remove the tow bar prior to the flight.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 441 Conquest in York: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 22, 2011 at 1725 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N48BS
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Long Beach - York
MSN:
441-0125
YOM:
1980
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
1409
Captain / Total hours on type:
502.00
Aircraft flight hours:
5995
Circumstances:
Toward the end of a 6 hour, 20 minute flight, during a night visual approach, the pilot flew the airplane to a left traffic pattern downwind leg. At some point, he lowered the landing gear and set the flaps to 30 degrees. He turned the airplane to a left base leg, and after doing so, was heard on the common traffic frequency stating that he had an "engine out." The airplane then passed through the final leg course, the pilot called "base to final," and the airplane commenced a right turn while maintaining altitude. The angle of bank was then observed to increase to where the airplane's wings became vertical, then inverted, and the airplane rolled into a near-vertical descent, hitting the ground upright in a right spin. Subsequent examination of the airplane and engines revealed that the right engine was not powered at impact, and the propeller from that engine was not in feather. No mechanical anomalies could be found with the engine that could have resulted in its failure. The right fuel tank was breeched; however, fuel calculations, confirmed by some fuel found in the right fuel tank as well as fuel found in the engine fuel filter housing, indicated that fuel exhaustion did not occur. Unknown is why the pilot did not continue through a left turn descent onto the final approach leg toward airport, which would also have been a turn toward the operating engine. The pilot had a communication device capable of voice calls, texting, e-mail and alarms, among other functions. E-mails were sent by the device until 0323, and an alarm sounded at 0920. It is unknown if or how much pilot fatigue might have influenced the outcome.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain minimum control airspeed after a loss of power to the right engine, which resulted in an uncontrollable roll into an inadvertent stall/spin. Contributing to the accident was the failure of the airplane's right engine for reasons that could not be determined because no preexisting mechanical anomalies were found, and the pilot's subsequent turn toward that inoperative engine while maintaining altitude.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 441 Conquest in Sunriver: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jul 16, 2008 at 1015 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N441HK
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Bakersfield - Sunriver
MSN:
441-0336
YOM:
1984
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
965
Captain / Total hours on type:
277.00
Aircraft flight hours:
5643
Circumstances:
The pilot was executing a day visual flight rules full-stop landing and touched down on the main landing gear near the approach end of the runway. Soon after the initial touchdown, the airplane became airborne again. Instead of initiating a go-around, the pilot attempted to continue the landing sequence. During that attempt, the airplane bounced on the runway three or four times, each time the rebound back into the air and the runway contact was more severe. During the last contact the airplane impacted the runway with sufficient force to result in the failure of the right main landing gear actuator rod, and in the right propeller contacting the runway surface multiple times. The pilot then initiated a go-around, but since the right engine had failed due to the multiple propeller strikes, the airplane produced asymmetrical thrust and began to roll to the right, veering off the right side of the runway. Soon thereafter its right wing collided with a tree and the airplane impacted terrain in an open field. The airplane was consumed by fire shortly after the collision. Post crash inspection found no evidence of mechanical failure or malfunction with the airframe or either engine.
Probable cause:
The pilot's misjudged landing flare and improper recovery from a bounced landing, and the pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the go-around after one of the airplane's propellers struck the runway.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 441 Conquest in Anchorage

Date & Time: Aug 28, 2005 at 2129 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N77SA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Cordova-Anchorage
MSN:
441-0329
YOM:
1983
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
17000
Captain / Total hours on type:
50.00
Aircraft flight hours:
11049
Circumstances:

The twin engine aircraft made a gear-up landing and skidded on runway 07R before coming to rest in flames. Both occupants were uninjured but the aircraft was damaged beyond repair. The pilot confirmed that all three green lights were on during the approach.

Crash of a Cessna 441 Conquest in Palm Beach: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 30, 2003 at 1115 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N111RC
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Boca Raton-West Palm Beach
MSN:
441-0188
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
5832
Aircraft flight hours:
4036
Circumstances:

On approach, the twin engine aircraft crashed into a lake near Greenacres City. During the last minute flight, the aircraft passed from 2,500 feet and 106 knots to 200 feet and 64 knots before stalling and crashing.

Crash of a Cessna 441 Conquest in Birmingham: 2 killed

Date & Time: Dec 10, 2003 at 1420 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N441W
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Birmingham-Venice
MSN:
441-0181
YOM:
1980
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
8378
Captain / Total hours on type:
424.00
Aircraft flight hours:
5933
Circumstances:

After takeoff from runway 24, while climbing to 5,000 and 10,000 feet, the pilot sent a mayday message and the aircraft descended in a nose-down spiral before crashing in a wooded area located 9,2 nautical miles southwest from departure point.

Crash of a Cessna 441 Conquest in Kansas: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jan 30, 2002 at 1359 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N441AR
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Springdale-Rifle
MSN:
441-0148
YOM:
1980
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
1500
Aircraft flight hours:
3529
Circumstances:

While cruising at 28,000 feet, pilot informed ATC about gyrocompas failure. Thirteen minutes later, the aircraft crashed in an frozen field. Both occupants were killed. Pilot suffered spatial disorientation after gyrocompas failed. The aircraft lost 27,000 feet in 14 minutes.