Country

Crash of a Britten-Norman Trislander off Turks and Caicos Islands: 12 killed

Date & Time: Dec 15, 2008 at 1645 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N650LP
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Santiago de los Caballeros - Abraham's Bay - New York
MSN:
1029
YOM:
1976
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
11
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
12
Circumstances:
The aircraft was making a charter flight from Santiago to New York with an intermediate stop at Abraham's Bay, Mayaguana Island (Bahamas). The flight departed Santiago-Cibao Airport, Dominican Republic, at 1605LT. Thirty-five minutes later, while cruising off Turks & Caicos Islands, the pilot sent a brief mayday message and the aircraft crashed 16 miles off shore. SAR teams and US Cost Guards did not find any trace of the aircraft and all 12 occupants were considered as deceased.

Crash of a Britten-Norman BN-2A-III-2 Trislander off Little Farmer's Cay

Date & Time: Nov 9, 1997
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
F-OGOR
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
1049
YOM:
1977
Country:
Crew on board:
0
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Crashed in unknown circumstances in the sea off Little Farmer's Cay. There were no casualties.

Crash of a Britten-Norman BN-2A-2 Trislander III near Sampit: 17 killed

Date & Time: Oct 25, 1991
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
PK-KTC
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Palangkaraya - Sampit
MSN:
1017
YOM:
1975
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
15
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
17
Circumstances:
Upon arrival in Sampit, the crew encountered poor weather conditions and the captain decided to initiate a go-around and to follow a holding circuit for weather improvement. The aircraft turned for about three hours over the area when it crashed in a mountainous area located few km from Sampit. All 17 occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
It is believed that the crew lost control of the airplane following a triple engine failure due to a fuel exhaustion.

Crash of a Britten-Norman BN-2A Trislander III near Port Vila

Date & Time: Jan 3, 1990
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
YJ-RV3
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Lenakel - Port-Vila
MSN:
349
YOM:
1973
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
0
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
While approaching Port Vila following an uneventful flight from Lenakel, all three engines failed due to fuel exhaustion. The pilot attempted an emergency landing when the aircraft struck coconut trees and crashed in a pasture. The aircraft was damaged beyond repair and all occupants were rescued.
Probable cause:
Engine failure caused by fuel exhaustion. It is believed that the fuel selector was positioned on the main fuel tanks which were empty at the time of the accident while fuel remained in the auxiliary tanks.

Crash of a Britten-Norman BN-2A Trislander III-2 in Playa del Carmen: 6 killed

Date & Time: May 5, 1989 at 1430 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
XA-JPE
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Chichén Itzá – Cozumel
MSN:
1051
YOM:
1977
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
17
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Circumstances:
En route from Chichén Itzá to Cozumel, the crew encountered engine problems and was cleared to divert to Playa del Carmen for an emergency landing. On final, the aircraft lost height and crashed 3 km short of runway. Six passengers were killed while 13 other occupants were injured.
Probable cause:
Engine problems for unknown reasons.

Crash of a Britten-Norman BN-2A Trislander III-1 in Hale

Date & Time: Feb 9, 1987 at 0906 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-OCME
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Liverpool – Douglas
MSN:
262
YOM:
1971
Location:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
1800
Captain / Total hours on type:
130.00
Circumstances:
The aircraft was engaged upon a contracted freight (mail) flight, from Liverpool to the Isle of Man, U.K, and was planned to depart Liverpool at 07:29 hrs. Prior to departure the fuel gauges indicated between 80 and 85 Imperial Gallons (IG). As the required fuel for the planned flight was 82 IG, the aircraft was not refuelled. After an uneventful flight, made a radar approach to runway 09 at the Ronaldsway-Isle of Man Airport. Having failed to see the runway by decision height, 460 feet, the commander carried out a go-around procedure and returned to the VOR approach beacon before departing on course to the selected diversion. Considering the wind, the pilot made a return to Liverpool (86 nm) instead of the planned diversion airfield of to Valley RAF Station (51 nm). When abeam the Wallasey VOR, 15 nm from Liverpool airport, the aircraft was positioned, by radar, downwind for an approach to runway 27. As the aircraft turned onto the final approach path, the right engine lost power but. The pilot did not feather the propeller, in the belief that the engine was still producing some power. As the rate of descent increased, he applied full throttle to all three engines but, despite this and the selection of the speed necessary to achieve the optimum climb rate, the aircraft continued to descend at a rate which made a landing considerably short of the runway inevitable. The commander made a truncated MAYDAY call and firmly placed the aircraft in a convenient open field below and slightly to the north of the normal approach path. The accident site was a low lying field of winter crop that was subject to tidal flooding. Approximately halfway across the field there was a 2.4 metre wide by 2.4 metre deep drainage ditch, which ran at 45 degrees to the direction of travel of the aircraft. The initial touchdown was some 76 metres to the east of the ditch, on a heading of 270 degrees magnetic. Just after initial touchdown, the right main landing gear failed rearwards and the aircraft continued on its nose and left landing gear, until a collision with an embankment bordering the ditch caused the remaining landing gears to collapse. The aircraft finally came to rest with its fuselage in the drainage ditch, supported by the wings which were resting on the embankments either side.
Probable cause:
Examination of the flight profile, and associated flight times, showed that all the fuel aboard the aircraft would have been consumed and, therefore, the likely reason for the lack of response to full throttle, when the right engine failed, was a previous or simultaneous failure of the centre engine due to fuel starvation.
Final Report: