Crash of a Beechcraft 70 Queen Air in Leonora

Date & Time: Jun 24, 2000 at 1740 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
VH-MWJ
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Leonora – Laverton
MSN:
LB-29
YOM:
1970
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The Beechcraft Queen Air and Rockwell Aero Commander were being used by a company to conduct private category passenger-carrying flights to transport its workers from Leonora to Laverton in Western Australia. The Aero Commander had departed and was established in the Leonora circuit area when the Queen Air took off. The pilot and one of the passengers of the Queen Air reported the take-off roll appeared normal until the aircraft crossed the runway intersection, when they felt a bump in the aircraft. The pilot reported hearing a loud bang and noticed that the inboard cowl of the right engine had opened. He also reported that he believed he had insufficient runway remaining to stop safely, so he continued the takeoff. The cowl separated from the aircraft at the time, or just after the pilot rotated the aircraft to the take-off attitude. He reported that although the aircraft had left the ground after the rotation, it then would not climb. The aircraft remained at almost treetop level until the pilot and front-seat passenger noticed the side of a tailings dump immediately in front of the aircraft. The pilot said that he pulled the control column fully back. The aircraft hit the hillside parallel to the slope of the embankment, with little forward speed. The impact destroyed the aircraft. Although the occupants sustained serious injuries, they evacuated the aircraft without external assistance. There was no post-impact fire. The aircraft-mounted emergency locator transmitter (ELT) did not activate.
Probable cause:
The examination of the Queen Air wreckage found no mechanical fault that may have contributed to the accident sequence other than the inboard cowl of the right engine detaching during the takeoff. The cowl latching mechanisms appeared to have been capable of operating normally. The two top hinges failing in overload associated with the lack of cowl latch damage suggested that the cowl was probably improperly secured before takeoff. The cowl appeared to have subsequently opened when it experienced the jolt when the aircraft crossed the runway intersection. The lack of any further cowl damage indicated that it detached cleanly and consequently its dislodgment should not have adversely affected the flying qualities of the aircraft.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft 70 Queen Air near Villanueva del Rosario: 4 killed

Date & Time: Aug 4, 1994 at 0217 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
EC-FLZ
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Madrid – Málaga
MSN:
LB-21
YOM:
1969
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
1715
Aircraft flight hours:
3970
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft departed Madrid-Barajas Airport at 0020LT on a charter flight to Málaga, carrying three passengers and one pilot. After descending from FL080, the pilot was cleared to initiate a visual approach in preparation for a landing at Málaga-Pablo Ruiz Picasso Runway 14. After passing the altitude of 3,000 feet, about 12 NM north of Málaga VOR, the pilot started a turn to the left when the aircraft struck the slope of a rocky mountain (850 metres high) located near Villanueva del Rosario. The aircraft disintegrated on impact and all four occupants were killed. The wreckage was found few metres below the summit. At the time of the accident, the visibility was good with few clouds (1-4 octas) at 1,800 feet.
Probable cause:
It was determined that the collision with terrain occurred while the pilot was attempting a night visual approach, after he mistook the lights of the principal avenue of the nearest city with the runway lights of Málaga Airport.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft 70 Queen Air in Albany: 6 killed

Date & Time: Aug 2, 1989 at 1516 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N11TP
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Albany - Akron
MSN:
LB-12
YOM:
1969
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Captain / Total flying hours:
5000
Aircraft flight hours:
4310
Circumstances:
During takeoff, the aircraft rolled abruptly to the right after lift-off. Subsequently, the right wingtip struck the surface, then the aircraft cartwheeled and crashed. The fuselage was destroyed by a post-crash fire. An exam of the engines revealed that the right engine supercharger intermediate drive gear shaft had become worn and one of its gear teeth had failed from fatigue. There was evidence that an out-of-mesh condition occurred, which resulted in a partial loss of engine power during takeoff. Also, the aircraft was estimated to be 679 lbs over its max certified gross weight. Density alt was calculated to be about 2,000 feet. All six occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
The fatigue failure of the supercharger intermediate drive gear shaft (gear tooth), which resulted in a partial loss of power, and the pilot's initiation of lift-off before reaching VMC airspeed. Factors related to the accident were: the worn intermediate drive gear shaft, the pilot's operation of the aircraft above its maximum certified gross weight limit, and the high density altitude.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft 70 Queen Air in Gulfport: 8 killed

Date & Time: Mar 1, 1979 at 1504 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N777AE
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Gulfport - New Orleans
MSN:
LB-34
YOM:
1970
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
8
Captain / Total flying hours:
1528
Captain / Total hours on type:
15.00
Circumstances:
Following takeoff from Gulfport-Biloxi Airport, the twin engine airplane encountered difficulties to gain height and sufficient speed. It stalled then crashed in a marsh located 1,500 feet past the runway end. The aircraft was destroyed and all eight occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Stall during initial climb after the pilot failed to maintain flying speed. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Improper emergency procedures,
- Inadequate preflight preparation,
- Inadequate inspection of aircraft on part of the maintenance personnel,
- Operational supervisory personnel: deficiency, company maintained equipment, services, regulation,
- Rules, regulations, standards personnel,
- Improperly loaded aircraft,
- Wing flap control system eélectrical,
- Nose baggage door opened during takeoff,
- Starter interrupt system,
- Flaps inoperative,
- Inadequate part 135 training.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft 70 Queen Air in Lakhdaria: 9 killed

Date & Time: Oct 17, 1975
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
7T-VSD
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
LB-9
YOM:
1969
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
9
Circumstances:
The twin engine airplane crashed in unknown circumstances in Lakhdaria, about 45 km southeast of Algiers. The aircraft was destroyed and all nine occupants were killed. The airplane was completing a special flight for the National Oil Company Sonatrach.

Crash of a Beechcraft B70 Queen Air near Fowler: 3 killed

Date & Time: Sep 17, 1971 at 0804 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N1384A
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Pueblo - Huntsville
MSN:
LB-18
YOM:
1969
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
6000
Circumstances:
While in cruising altitude, the crew encountered poor weather conditions when control was lost. The airplane crashed near Fowler and was destroyed, killing all three occupants. The wreckage was found a day later.
Probable cause:
Loss of control caused by icing conditions. The following factors were reported:
- Inadequate weather briefing,
- Airframe ice,
- Aircraft equipped with deicing system but usage undetermined.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft 70 Queen Air in Arris: 8 killed

Date & Time: Jan 21, 1971
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
7T-VSI
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Algiers - Biskra
MSN:
LB-15
YOM:
1969
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
8
Circumstances:
Operated by Air Algérie, the twin engine aircraft was chartered by an Oil Company to transfer four French and two Algerian engineers to Biskra. While cruising in limited visibility, the crew started the descent when the airplane struck a mountain slope located in the Aurès Mountain Range. The wreckage was found near Arris, some 80 km northeast of Biskra Airport. All eight occupants were killed, among them to French pilots.
Probable cause:
Controlled flight into terrain.