code

MS

Crash of a Mitsubishi MU-2B-60 Marquise in Hattiesburg: 4 killed

Date & Time: May 4, 2021 at 2322 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N322TA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Shepard AFB - Destin
MSN:
760
YOM:
1980
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft departed Shepard AFB (Wichita Falls) on a flight to Destin-Fort Walton Beach, Florida. En route, while descending by night to Hattiesburg-Bobby L. Chain Airport, the aircraft crashed onto a house located about 3 km short of runway 13. The aircraft and the house were totally destroyed and all three occupants and one people in the house were killed.

Crash of a Rockwell Sabreliner 65 near New Albany: 3 killed

Date & Time: Apr 13, 2019 at 1514 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N265DS
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Broomfield - University-Oxford - Hamilton
MSN:
465-45
YOM:
1980
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
On April 13, 2019 about 1514 CDT, a Rockwell International NA-265-65 airplane, N265DS, impacted terrain near New Albany, Mississippi, following a reported electrical malfunction. The two commercial pilots and one passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to Classic Aviation Inc. and operated as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Instrument meteorological conditions were reported at the accident site and along the route of flight about the time of the accident, and the flight was operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan. The flight originated from University-Oxford Airport (UOX), Mississippi, at 1506 and was destined for Marion County-Rankin Fite Airport (HAB), Georgia. According to recordings of ATC communications, at 1501 the flight requested a clearance from ATC to depart UOX and proceed to HAB. ATC provided a clearance. The next communication occurred at 1506 when the flight reported climbing through 1,300 ft. ATC notified the flight of moderate to severe precipitation in the area of UOX and provided a clearance to 11k ft MSL. At 1508 ATC queried the flight for their altitude and informed the flight of moderate to heavy precipitation along their route of flight. The flight acknowledged the radio call and informed ATC they were climbing through 9k ft for 11k ft. About 1512 ATC queried the flight if they were having navigation issues or if they were deviating. The flight responded they were deviating and that they were having "AC voltage problems." The last radio call received from the flight was an acknowledgement of a heading assignment to 095° at 1513. The airplane disappeared from radar about 30 seconds later and the ATC controller tried unsuccessfully to raise the flight on the radio at that time. Preliminary radar data began tracking the airplane at 1506. The airplane transponder stopped transmitting Mode 3A information about 1508, so no altitude information was available for the remainder of the flight. The airplane maintained an approximate heading of 080° from 1506 until about 1510. At 1510 the airplane turned right to about 120° heading. At 1512 the airplane made a left turn to about 040° heading. At 1513 the airplane began a right turn that continued to a heading of about 270° until radar contact was lost at 1513:26. The final radar return was about .5 miles southeast of the accident location. The airplane impacted terrain in a wooded and rural area on a 005° heading. Broken trees indicated the airplane attitude at impact was about 50° right bank and 20° nose low. The wreckage was highly fragmented and spread over an area about 800 ft wide and 1,500 ft long. A cockpit voice recorder was recovered and sent to the NTSB recorder's laboratory for examination.

Crash of a Lockheed KC-130T Hercules near Itta Bena: 16 killed

Date & Time: Jul 10, 2017 at 1630 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
165000
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Cherry Point - El Centro
MSN:
5303
YOM:
1992
Crew on board:
16
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
16
Circumstances:
The aircraft left MCAS Cherry Point-Cunningham Field in the early afternoon for a refueling mission. En route, in unclear circumstances, the aircraft went out of control, dove into the ground and apparently crashed in a flat attitude in a soybeans field located 7 miles southwest of Itta Bena. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire and all 16 occupants have been killed. They were en route to NAS El Centro, California. The aircraft was delivered in December 1992.

Crash of a Piper PA-46-500TP Meridian in Corinth

Date & Time: Dec 24, 2015 at 0840 LT
Registration:
N891CR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Corinth - Key Largo
MSN:
46-97321
YOM:
2007
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
1990
Captain / Total hours on type:
427.00
Aircraft flight hours:
1407
Circumstances:
On the day of the accident, a line service technician had disconnected the airplane from a battery charger. After disconnecting the battery, he left the right access door open which provided access to the fuel control unit, fuses, fuel line, oil line, and battery charging port as he always did. He then towed the airplane from the hangar it was stored in, and parked it in front of the airport's terminal building. The three passengers arrived first, and then about 30 minutes later the pilot arrived. He uploaded his navigational charts and did a preflight check "which was normal." The engine start, taxi, and engine run up, were also normal. The wing flaps were set to 10°. After liftoff he "retracted the landing gear" and continued to climb. Shortly thereafter the right cowl door opened partially, and started "flopping" up and down 3 to 4 inches in each direction. He reduced the torque to try to prevent the right cowl door from coming completely open. However, when he turned on the left crosswind leg to return to the runway, the right cowl door opened completely, and the airplane would not maintain altitude even with full power, so he "put the nose back down." The airplane struck trees, and then pancaked, and slid sideways and came to rest, in the front yard of an abandoned house. The private pilot and one passenger received minor injuries. Two passengers received serious injuries, one of whom was found out of her seat, unconscious, on the floor of the airplane shortly after the accident, and died about 227 days later. During the investigation, it could not be determined, if she had properly used the restraint system, as it was found unlatched with the seatbelt portion of the assembly extended. Examination of the wreckage revealed no evidence of any preimpact failures or malfunctions of the airplane or engine that would have precluded normal operation. It was discovered though, that the right access door had not been closed and latched by the pilot before takeoff, as examination of the right access door latches and clevis keepers found them to be functional, with no indication of overstress or deformation which would have been present if the access door had been forced open due to air loads in-flight, or during the impact sequence. Further examination also revealed that the battery charging port cover which was inside the compartment that the right access door allowed access to, had not been placed and secured over the battery charging port, indicating that the preflight inspection had not been properly completed. A checklist that was provided by a simulator training provider was found by the pilot's seat station. Examination of the checklist revealed that under the section titled: "EXTERIOR PREFLIGHT" only one item was listed which stated, "EXTERIOR PREFLIGHT…COMPLETE." It also stated on both sides of the checklist: "FOR SIMULATOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY." A copy of the airplane manufacturer's published pilot's operating handbook (POH) was found in a cabinet behind the pilot's seat where it was not accessible from the pilot's station. Review of the POH revealed that it contained detailed guidance regarding the preflight check of the airplane. Additionally, it was discovered that the landing gear was in the down and locked position which would have degraded the airplane's ability to accelerate and climb by producing excess drag, and indicated that the pilot had not retracted the landing gear as he thought he did, as the landing gear handle was still in the down position. Review of recorded data from the airplanes avionics system also indicated that the airplane had roughly followed the runway heading while climbing until it reached the end of the runway. The pilot had then entered a left turn and allowed the bank angle to increase to about 45°, and angle of attack to increase to about 8°, which caused the airspeed to decrease below the stalling speed (which would have been about 20% higher than normal due to the increased load factor from the steep turn) until the airplane entered an aerodynamic stall, indicating that the pilot allowed himself to become distracted by the open door, rather than maintaining control of the airplane.
Probable cause:
The pilot's inadequate preflight inspection and his subsequent failure to maintain airplane control, which resulted in an access door opening after takeoff, and the airplane exceeding its critical angle of attack and experiencing an aerodynamic stall.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft C90A King Air in Houston

Date & Time: Jun 25, 2014 at 0750 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N800MK
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Memphis - Houston
MSN:
LJ-1460
YOM:
1997
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2105
Captain / Total hours on type:
223.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
12000
Copilot / Total hours on type:
700
Aircraft flight hours:
2708
Circumstances:
On June 25, 2014, about 0750 central daylight time, a Raytheon Aircraft Company C90A, N800MK, was substantially damaged following a runway excursion during an attempted go-around at Houston, Mississippi (M44). The commercial-rated pilot, co-pilot, and two passengers were not injured, while one passenger received minor injuries. The airplane was
operated by BECS, LLC under the provisions of 14 CFR Part 91, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed for corporate flight that originated at Memphis, Tennessee (MEM). According to the pilot, who was seated in the left, cockpit seat, he was at the controls and was performing a visual approach to runway 21. Just prior to touchdown, while at 90 knots and with approach flaps extended, the right wing "rose severely and tried to put the airplane into a severe left bank." He recalled that the co-pilot called "wind shear" and "go around." As he applied power, the airplane rolled left again, so he retarded the throttles and allowed the airplane to settle into the grass on the left side of runway 21. The airplane struck a ditch, spun around, and came to rest in the grass, upright. A post-crash fire ensued in the left engine area. The pilot and passengers exited the airplane using the main entry door. The pilot reported no mechanical anomalies with the airplane prior to the accident. The co-pilot reported the following. As they turned onto final, he noticed that the wind "picked up" a little by the wind sock. The final approach was stable, and as the pilot began to flare, he noticed the vertical speed indicator "pegged out." The airplane encountered an unexpected wind shear just above the runway. He called out for a go around. The pilot was doing everything he could to maintain control of the airplane. It was a "jarring" effect when they hit the shear. It felt like the wind was trying to lift the tail and cartwheel them over. He felt that the pilot did a good job of keeping the airplane from flipping over. In his 30,000-plus hours flying airplanes, he has never experienced anything quite like what they experienced with this shear. He has instructed on the King Air and does not feel that the pilot could have done anything different to avoid the accident.
Probable cause:
The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be: The pilot’s failure to maintain a stabilized approach and his subsequent failure to maintain airplane control during the landing flare, which resulted in touchdown off the side of the runway and collision with a ditch.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft T-1A Jayhawk in Biloxi

Date & Time: Aug 16, 2003 at 2221 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
91-0093
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Del Rio - Biloxi
MSN:
TT-34
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The Mishap Student pilot (MSP) was flying an Instrument Landing System (ILS) approach to runway 21 at Keesler AFB. They were in Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC) at night and the runway was wet. After some deviations on the approach, they arrived over the threshold on a normal glide slope and faster (about 114 kts) than the computed approach speed of 108 kts. The aircraft touched down approximately 1500 feet down the runway. The Mishap Instructor Pilot (MIP) actuated the speed brakes/spoilers switch and the student began to immediately apply brake pressure. After 4-5 seconds, the instructor recognized that the aircraft was not decelerating and declared that she was taking control of the aircraft. The instructor immediately applied maximum braking with no perceived deceleration. She then grabbed the glare shield in an attempt to gain additional leverage on the brakes and again felt no perceived deceleration. At this point, the aircraft was rapidly running out of available runway. The instructor selected the emergency brakes just prior to arriving at the departure end threshold and the brakes locked resulting in a hydroplane skid. The aircraft departed the prepared surface and came to a halt 190 feet later. As a result of the runway departure, the right main and nose gear collapsed, and the forward fuselage and both wings were heavily damaged.
Probable cause:
Based on clear and convincing evidence, the Board President determined that this mishap was caused by a combination of several factors during the landing sequence. First, the Mishap Student Pilot (MSP) flew faster than the computed approach and landing speeds. Additionally she maintained higher than idle thrust for the first few seconds after touchdown. Because of these factors, the aircraft did not settle completely on the runway after touchdown-as the struts were not completely compressed. This put the aircraft systems in the "AIR" mode meaning that the speed brakes/spoilers could not deploy. Finally, the runway was wet; and the crew was inexperienced and thus did not recognize the anti-skid cycling at high speeds on the wet runway.

Crash of a Piper PA-31P Pressurized Navajo in Louisville: 1 killed

Date & Time: Sep 27, 1999 at 0605 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N100EE
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Tupelo - Louisville
MSN:
31-7530003
YOM:
1975
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
4100
Circumstances:
The pilot received a weather briefing before departure and when near the destination airport, cleared for the NDB approach. The pilot reported the procedure turn inbound; published MDA is 1,300 feet msl. Witnesses on the airport reported heavy low fog and heard the pilot announce over the UNICOM frequency, 'Oh there is fog rolling into Starkville too?' One of the witnesses advised the pilot they could go to another airport due to the fog; the pilot responded he would execute the approach. The witnesses heard the engines operating at full power then heard the impact and saw a fireball. The airplane impacted the runway inverted, slid across the runway, and came to rest in grass off the runway. A post crash fire destroyed the airplane. Tree contact approximately 972 feet northwest of the runway impact location separated approximately 51 inches of the left wing. Examination of the engines, propellers, and flight controls revealed no evidence of preimpact failure or malfunction. The pilot had twice failed his airline transport pilot checkride. The designated examiner of the second failed flight test indicated the pilot was marginal in all flight operations. The NDB was checked after the accident; no discrepancies were noted.
Probable cause:
The pilot's disregard for the published minimum descent altitude resulting in tree contact and separation of 51 inches of the left wing. Findings in the investigation were the pilot's two failures of the ATP checkride in a multiengine airplane.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft B100 King Air in Jackson: 1 killed

Date & Time: Nov 13, 1997 at 1238 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N500ML
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Muscle Shoals – Jackson
MSN:
BE-78
YOM:
1979
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
3646
Captain / Total hours on type:
162.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4231
Circumstances:
During an IFR arrival, vectors were provided for an ILS runway 16L approach. While on assigned heading and altitude of 270 degrees and 3,000 feet, about 8 miles north of the final approach fix, the pilot was told to turn left to 185 degrees and maintain 2,200 feet until established on the localizer, then he was cleared for the approach. The pilot acknowledged the instructions. About 1 minute later, communication and radar contact with the airplane were lost. Eye witnesses near the accident site observed the airplane as it descended below the cloud layer. The airplane was described as being in a steep left bank with the nose down. Witnesses also stated that the engines were revving. Within seconds of the visual sighting, the airplane crashed. Examination of the airframe failed to disclose a mechanical problem. No fire or smoke was seen coming from the airplane before it crashed. The pilot did not report experiencing a problem with the airplane to the tower controller. Toxicology tests of the pilot indicated O.323 mcg/ml chlorpheniramine (a sedating antihistamine) in liver fluid and 0.073 mcg/ml chlorpheniramine in kidney fluid. Also, unspecified levels of dextromethorphan (a cough suppressant), pseudoephedrine (a decibgestabt), and phenylpropanolamine (a decongestant) were reported in kidney and liver fluids. All medications are available in over-the-counter cold remedies.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain control of the aircraft due to spatial disorientation. A related factor was: the instrument weather conditions.
Final Report:

Crash of a Learjet 31 in Aberdeen

Date & Time: Sep 2, 1997 at 1020 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N71JC
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Madison - Aberdeen
MSN:
31-008
YOM:
1989
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
19947
Captain / Total hours on type:
1860.00
Aircraft flight hours:
1845
Circumstances:
According to the pilot, the airplane was high and fast on final approach, because of restricted visibility in haze, and he executed a go-around. The pilot and copilot do not recall retracting the landing gear. During the second approach, the pilot stated he did not extended the gear because he was 'sure in his mind that the gear was already down'. The airplane landed with the gear retracted. The airplane slid approximately 3,000 feet. Following the landing, the airplane caught fire under the right wing root, and the fire could not be extinguished with hand held fire extinguishers. Both pilots safely evacuated the airplane.
Probable cause:
The flightcrew's failure to extend the landing gear.
Final Report:

Crash of a Mitsubishi MU-2B-20 Marquise in Batesville

Date & Time: Apr 7, 1996 at 1155 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N310MA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Montgomery - Batesville
MSN:
167
YOM:
1969
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
1400
Captain / Total hours on type:
89.00
Aircraft flight hours:
5400
Circumstances:
The pilot reported that loss of power occurred in both engines after he entered the traffic pattern for a full stop landing. The airplane collided with trees during an emergency landing in a cotton field near the airport. Subsequent review of the aircraft maintenance logs disclosed that Mitsubishi MU-2 Service Bulletin (SB) 130A had not been accomplished on this airplane. According to the manufacturer, an inadvertent failure or the improper installation of a filler cap after refueling may cause an air pressure differential between the center and outboard portions of the main integral fuel tank. Air leakage from the filler cap may result in failure of the fuel transfer system to move fuel from the outboard tank section to the center tank section. To eliminate this possible malfunction, the operator was to remove vent check valves from the bulkhead between the tanks in accordance with SB 130A. The operator's maintenance policies required that, company jet and turbo propeller aircraft be maintained under a maintenance program in accordance with FAR Parts 135.415, 135.417, 135.423, 135.443, and a corporate flight management approved aircraft inspection program (AAIP). The maintenance inspection program also included compliance with manufacturers' service bulletins and service letters.
Probable cause:
An anomaly in the fuel system that allowed a pressure differential to occur between the center and outer portions of the main integral fuel tank, which in turn resulted in fuel starvation of both engines. A factor relating to the accident was: failure of company maintenance personnel to remove fuel system vent check valves as recommended by Mitsubishi MU-2 Service Bulletin 130A.
Final Report: