Country
code

Montevideo City District

Crash of a Swearingen SA227AC Metro III off Montevideo: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jun 6, 2012 at 1955 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
CX-LAS
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Montevideo - Buenos Aires
MSN:
AC-482
YOM:
1982
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
16177
Copilot / Total flying hours:
406
Circumstances:
Crew was performing a cargo flight from Montevideo to Buenos Aires on behalf of DHL. Aircraft left runway 24 at Montevideo-Carrasco Airport at 1945LT and crew was cleared to climb to FL080. While reaching a height of 4,500 feet, aircraft went out of control and dove into the sea off Flores Island, in the Rio de la Plata. Some debris were found a day later but the wreckage was localized two weeks later one NM south of Flores Island. The CVR was found on 02AUG2012 but was inexploitable as the content was concerning the last thirty minutes of the precedent flight. On 11FEB2013, fishermen found the cargo door in their fishnet.
Probable cause:
In a preliminary report, Uruguayan Authorities confirmed the aircraft dove into the sea and impacted the water at an angle of forty degrees nose down and at a speed of 570 knots (1,055 km/h), which caused the total disintegration of the aircraft. No trace of the cargo nor the crew was ever found. Investigations revealed that both engines were running normally at impact, that no propeller blades were lost during descent, that fuel was not contaminated and that no problems occurred on the on board electrical system. Meteorological Office confirmed that severe icing conditions prevailed at the time of the accident from a height of 1,000 feet to FL150.

Crash of an Embraer EMB-110C Bandeirante near Montevideo

Date & Time: Feb 25, 1991
Operator:
Registration:
T-581
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
110-079
YOM:
1975
Country:
Crew on board:
0
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
While descending to Montevideo-Carrasco Airport, both engines failed simultaneously. The crew completed an emergency landing in an open field located 11 km from the airport. All occupants escaped uninjured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair. The aircraft had the dual registration CX-BJK (civil) and T-581 (military).
Probable cause:
Double engine failure on approach due to fuel exhaustion.

Crash of a Piper PA-31-325 Navajo C/R in Montevideo: 2 killed

Date & Time: Aug 19, 1980
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
CX-BMT
Survivors:
No
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
On approach to Montevideo-Carrasco Airport, the pilot passed out. The pilot elected to take control of the aircraft that lost height and crashed. Both occupants were killed. The passenger was not familiar with piloting techniques.

Crash of a Canadair CL-44-6 in Montevideo

Date & Time: Oct 10, 1979
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
CX-BKD
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
8
YOM:
1960
Country:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On approach to Montevideo-Carrasco Airport, the crew encountered technical difficulties with the right main gear that would not deploy. The gear was recycled manually and all three green lights came on in the cockpit, indicating that all three landing gears were down and locked. Upon touchdown, the right main gear collapsed, causing the right wing to struck the runway surface. Out of control, the airplane veered off runway to the right and came to rest in a grassy area. All six occupants escaped uninjured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
The cause of the landing gear collapse could not be determined.

Crash of a Convair CV-240-0 in Montevideo

Date & Time: Jun 17, 1973
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
CX-BHS
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
20
YOM:
1948
Country:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
39
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On final approach to Montevideo-Carrasco Airport, the crew failed to realize his altitude was too low when the left main gear stuck the ground 12 meters short of runway threshold. On impact, the undercarriage was torn off and the airplane went out of control and crashed few dozen meters further. All 42 occupants escaped uninjured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
Wrong approach configuration, too low approach.

Crash of a Douglas C-47A-1-DK in Montevideo: 10 killed

Date & Time: Oct 9, 1962 at 1514 LT
Operator:
Registration:
CX-AGE
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Montevideo - Montevideo
MSN:
12113
YOM:
1943
Country:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
10
Captain / Total flying hours:
6380
Captain / Total hours on type:
5781.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1714
Aircraft flight hours:
5000
Circumstances:
The aircraft was undergoing the final flight test required for issuance of its Certificate of Airworthiness. It was to be a visual, local flight lasting about 1 hr 30 min. The takeoff run began at 15:14 hours, 200 m from the threshold of runway 23. This meant that 1900 m of the runway remained for the takeoff. The aircraft rose to a height which could not be determined but could not have been less than 5 m or more than 15 m. About 30 seconds after the commencement of the manoeuvre its right wing grazed the surface of the runway several times. During the later contacts the landing gear bounced off the ground with such force that the right tire burst and the landing gear leg broke causing the axle and propeller to hit the ground while the right engine was turning at almost full power. The aircraft again bounced into the air rolled over completely and finally came to rest upside down. Between the time the aircraft bounced into the air and the moment it finally came to rest, the pilot turned the power off completely. This was proved by an inspection of the condition and final positions of both propellers and the engine control switches, which were in the "off" position. Fire broke out for reasons that could not be precisely ascertained. The aircraft was totally destroyed and all 10 occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
The accident was attributed to a maintenance error, which was not noticed by the airline inspectors and the inspector from the Directorate General of Civil Aviation. This was followed by an omission on the part of the pilot.
Final Report:

Crash of a Short S.25 Sunderland 5 off Montevideo

Date & Time: Feb 11, 1959 at 1710 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
LV-AHG
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Buenos Aires – Montevideo
MSN:
SH.70C
YOM:
1946
Country:
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
49
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Upon landing on water off Montevideo, the seaplane struck an unknown floating object that caused damages to the structure. The airplane stopped and partially sank rapidly. All 55 occupants were evacuated safely while the aircraft was recovered and later declared as damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
Collision with an unknown floating object upon landing.

Crash of a Convair CV-440 Metropolitan in Montevideo: 1 killed

Date & Time: Sep 18, 1957 at 2120 LT
Operator:
Registration:
PP-AQE
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
São Paulo – Porto Alegre – Montevideo – Buenos Aires
MSN:
456
YOM:
1957
Country:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
30
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The aircraft was on a scheduled flight from Sao Paulo to Porto Alegre, Montevideo (Carrasco) and Buenos Aires . Thirty passengers and five crew were aboard. At Porto Alegre the aircraft was refuelled and took off at 1917 hours for Montevideo with 1 471 gallons on board. It passed over Treinta y Tres at 2039 hours, flying at 2 400 metres, IFR. Over Minas the aircraft was cleared to descent to 1 200 metres and was instructed by the control centre to call back when 50 km out from the aerodrome. The flight again contacted the control centre from that point. The aircraft was transferred to aerodrome control and overflew the CAR radio beacon at 2115 hours, at 600 metres, visual. It carried out a visual approach procedure as the runway lights were clearly visible throughout. However, it undershot and the port and nose wheels hit a small earth bank bordering highway 102. It is considered that the aircraft was correctly aligned with the runway, or was perhaps making a slight left turn in order to correct a small deviation. The starboard wing touched ground some 2 metres further on. Some 170 metres further on the aircraft lost both propellers and the starboard engine. The starboard wing broke off causing the entire fuselage to effect a turn of 180° on its longitudinal axis. At the same time, unequal friction against the ground caused the body of the fuselage to skid to the right, turn on its vertical axis and come to rest 380 metres from impact. The slope, though slight, contributed to the downward movement of the aircraft. The accident occurred between 2119 and 2121 hours. One crew member was killed.
Probable cause:
From the evidence collected there is no doubt that the accident was due to pilot error. Nevertheless, the Commission found no actual proof of what caused this error. The possible factor of malfunction of flight material or ground aids and services has been ruled out. The pilot-in-command is unable to explain why the aircraft struck the ground when, according to his visual estimation and instrument reading, he should have had about 80 metres clearance. He was so certain of this that he was entirely convinced of having collided with another aircraft. From the only altimeter which was in a condition to be examined, it was seen that at least the copilot should have had a true reading of the distance from the ground. When the pilot last observed the instrument, it read 100 metres. At this very moment his visibility was reduced to nil, as he entered a small fog patch (below the correct track) and switched on his landing lights, thereby reducing or eliminating the possibility of direct visual reference. It should be pointed out that at the point where visibility cleared again before impact, the runway provided the pilot's only visual reference, as the entire area below was almost completely dark, apart from the fact that it was probably covered by a very thin layer of fog on the ground.
Final Report:

Crash of a Vought-Sikorsky VS-44 off Montevideo: 4 killed

Date & Time: Aug 15, 1947 at 2345 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
CX-AIR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
4403
YOM:
1942
Country:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
While landing by night off Montevideo, the seaplane crashed, overturned and sank. Four crew members were killed while both passengers and a fifth crewman were injured. The aircraft was lost.
Source:
http://1000aircraftphotos.com/Contributions/HornDavid/9343.htm

Crash of a Loening C-2 Air Yacht off Montevideo

Date & Time: Apr 3, 1932
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
NC9717
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
215
YOM:
1929
Country:
Crew on board:
0
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Crashed in unknown circumstances into the sea off Montevideo. No casualties.