Country

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-3 Otter in Family Lake: 3 killed

Date & Time: Oct 26, 2019 at 0830 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GBTU
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Bissett - Family Lake
MSN:
209
YOM:
1957
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
9000
Circumstances:
The single engine airplane departed Bissett that morning on a charter flight to a lodge located at Family Lake, with two passengers and a pilot on board. While approaching, the airplane clipped a tree, crashed into the lake and sank about 280 km northeast of Winnipeg. The aircraft was lost and all three occupants were killed.

Crash of a Beechcraft 200 Super King Air in Gillam

Date & Time: Apr 24, 2019 at 1900 LT
Operator:
Registration:
C-FRMV
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Winnipeg - Churchill
MSN:
BB-979
YOM:
1982
Location:
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The twin engine airplane was on its way from Winnipeg to Churchill, carrying two paramedics and two pilots on an ambulance flight. While passing over Gillam, the crew encountered an unexpected situation, declared an emergency and diverted to Gillam Airport. On final approach, the airplane struck the icy surface of Stephens Lake. While contacting the shore, both main gears were torn off and the airplane came to a rest near the runway threshold. All four occupants were evacuated safely.

Crash of a Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain in Thompson

Date & Time: Sep 15, 2015 at 1845 LT
Operator:
Registration:
C-FXLO
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Thompson – Winnipeg
MSN:
31-8052022
YOM:
1980
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from Thompson Regional Airport, while climbing, the crew informed ATC about unexpected problems and attempted to return to his departure point. On approach, the twin engine aircraft crashed in a wooded area located 2 km south of the airport. All eight occupants were injured and evacuated to local hospital while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan in Snow Lake: 1 killed

Date & Time: Nov 18, 2012 at 1005 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
C-GAGP
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Snow Lake - Winnipeg
MSN:
208-1213
YOM:
2006
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Few minutes after take off from Snow lake Airport, bound to Winnipeg in poor weather conditions, aircraft crashed in the bush two km from Snow Lake. The pilot, aged 40, was killed, while all eight passengers, local minors, were seriously injured. Aircraft was destroyed.

Crash of a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan in Pukatawagan: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jul 4, 2011 at 1610 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FMCB
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Pukatawagan - The Pas
MSN:
208-1114
YOM:
2005
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
1900
Captain / Total hours on type:
400.00
Circumstances:
The Beaver Air Services Limited Partnership Cessna 208B (registration C-FMCB serial number 208B1114), operated by its general partner Missinippi Management Ltd (Missinippi Airways), was departing Pukatawagan, Manitoba, for The Pas/Grace Lake Airport, Manitoba. At approximately 1610 Central Daylight Time, the pilot began the takeoff roll from Runway 33. The aircraft did not become fully airborne, and the pilot rejected the takeoff. The pilot applied reverse propeller thrust and braking, but the aircraft departed the end of the runway and continued down an embankment into a ravine. A post-crash fire ensued. One of the passengers was fatally injured; the pilot and the 7 other passengers egressed from the aircraft with minor injuries. The aircraft was destroyed. The emergency locator transmitter did not activate.
Probable cause:
Findings as to Causes and Contributing Factors:
Runway conditions, the pilot's takeoff technique, and possible shifting wind conditions combined to reduce the rate of the aircraft's acceleration during the takeoff roll and prevented it from attaining takeoff airspeed. The pilot rejected the takeoff past the point from which a successful rejected takeoff could be completed within the available stopping distance. The steep drop-off and sharp slope reversal at the end of Runway 33 contributed to the occupant injuries and fuel system damage that in turn caused the fire. This complicated passenger evacuation and prevented the rescue of the injured passenger. The deceased passenger was not wearing the available shoulder harness. This contributed to the serious injuries received as a result of the impact when the aircraft reached the bottom of the ravine and ultimately to his death in the post-impact fire.
Findings as to Risk:
If pilots are not aware of the increased aerodynamic drag during takeoff while using soft-field takeoff techniques they may experience an unexpected reduction in takeoff performance. Incomplete passenger briefings or inattentive passengers increase the risk that they will be unable to carry out critical egress procedures during an aircraft evacuation. When data recordings are not available to an investigation, this may preclude the identification and communication of safety deficiencies to advance transportation safety. Although the runway at Pukatawagan and many other aerodromes are compliant with Aerodrome Standards and Recommended Practices (TP 312E), the topography of the terrain beyond the runway ends may increase the likelihood of damage to aircraft and injuries to crew and passengers in the event of an aircraft overrunning or landing short. TC's responses to TSB recommendations for action to reduce the risk of post-impact fires have been rated as Unsatisfactory. As a result, there is a continuing risk of post-impact fires in impact-survivable accidents involving these aircraft. The lack of accelerate stop distance information for aircraft impedes the crew's ability to plan the takeoff-reject point accurately.
Other finding:
Several anomalies were found in the engine's power control hardware. There was no indication that these anomalies contributed to the occurrence.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft 100 King Air in Island Lake

Date & Time: Jan 16, 2009 at 2110 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GNAA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Thompson - Island Lake
MSN:
B-24
YOM:
1969
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3200
Captain / Total hours on type:
500.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1200
Copilot / Total hours on type:
620
Circumstances:
The crew was on a re-positioning flight from Thompson to Island Lake, Manitoba. On arrival in the Island Lake area, the crew commenced an instrument approach to Runway 12. On the final approach segment, the aircraft descended below the minimum descent altitude and the crew initiated a missed approach. During the missed approach, the aircraft struck trees. The crew was able to return for a landing on Runway 12 at Island Lake without further incident. The two crew members were not injured; the aircraft sustained damage to its right wing and landing gear doors. The accident occurred during hours of darkness at approximately 2110 Central Standard Time.
Probable cause:
Findings as to Causes and Contributing Factors:
1. The crew conducted an Area Navigation (RNAV) approach for which they were not trained, with an aircraft that was not properly equipped nor approved for such purpose.
2. The aircraft descended 300 feet below the minimum descent altitude (MDA) as a result of a number of lapses, errors and adaptations which, when combined, resulted in the mismanaged approach.
3. The aural warning on the aircraft’s altitude alerter had been silenced prior to the approach, which precluded it from alerting the crew when the aircraft descended below minimum descent altitude.
4. The SkyNorth standard operating procedures for conducting a non-precision approach were not followed, which resulted in the aircraft descending below the minimum descent altitude. During the ensuing missed approach, the aircraft struck trees.
Findings as to Risk:
1. The lack of a more-structured training environment and the type of supervisory flying provided increased the risk that deviations from standard operating procedures (SOPs) would not be identified.
2. There are several instrument approach procedures in Canada that contain step-down fixes that are not displayed on global positioning system (GPS) units. This may increase the risk of collision with obstacles during step-downs on approaches.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft A100 King Air in Gods Lake Narrows

Date & Time: Nov 22, 2008 at 2140 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FSNA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Gods Lake Narrows – Thompson
MSN:
B-227
YOM:
1976
Flight number:
SNA683
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3200
Captain / Total hours on type:
1850.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1000
Copilot / Total hours on type:
500
Circumstances:
The Sky North Air Ltd. Beechcraft A100 (registration C-FSNA, serial number B-227) operating as SN683 departed Runway 32 at Gods Lake Narrows, Manitoba, for Thompson, Manitoba with two pilots, a flight nurse, and two patients on board. Shortly after takeoff, while in a climbing left turn, smoke and then fire emanated from the pedestal area in the cockpit. The crew continued the turn, intending to return to Runway 14 at Gods Lake Narrows. The aircraft contacted trees and came to rest in a wooded area about one-half nautical mile northwest of the airport. The accident occurred at 2140 central standard time. All five persons onboard evacuated the aircraft; two received minor injuries. At approximately 0250, the accident site was located and the occupants were evacuated. The aircraft was destroyed by impact forces and a post-crash fire. The emergency locator transmitter was consumed by the fire and whether or not it transmitted a signal is unknown.
Probable cause:
Findings as to Causes and Contributing Factors:
1. An electrical short circuit in the cockpit pedestal area produced flames and smoke, which induced the crew to take emergency action.
2. The detrimental effects of aging on the wires involved may have been a factor in this electrical arc event.
3. The crew elected to return to the airport at low level in an environment with inadequate visual references. As a result, control of the aircraft was lost at an altitude from which a recovery was not possible.
Findings as to Risk:
1. The actions specified in the standard operating procedures (SOP) do not include procedures for an electrical fire encountered at low altitude at night, which could lead to a loss of control.
2. Visual inspection procedures in accordance with normal phase inspection requirements may be inadequate to detect defects progressing within wiring bundles, increasing the risk of electrical fires.
3. In the event of an in-flight cockpit pedestal fire, the first officer does not have ready access to available fire extinguishers, reducing the likelihood of successfully fighting a fire of this nature.
4. Sealed in plastic containers and stored behind each pilot seat, the oxygen masks and goggles are time consuming to access and cumbersome to apply and activate. This could increase the probability of injury or incapacitation through extended exposure to smoke or fumes, or could deter crews from using them, especially during periods of high cockpit workload.
Other Finding:
1. A failure of the hot-mic recording function of the cockpit voice recorder (CVR) had gone undetected and information that would have been helpful to the investigation was not available.
Final Report:

Crash of a Swearingen SA226AC Metro II in Norway House

Date & Time: Nov 8, 2006 at 0834 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FTNV
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Winnipeg – Norway House
MSN:
TC-239E
YOM:
1977
Flight number:
PAG105
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
6000
Captain / Total hours on type:
4500.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
4000
Copilot / Total hours on type:
15
Circumstances:
The aircraft was on a flight from Winnipeg, Manitoba, to Norway House, Manitoba, with two crew members and seven passengers on board. After touchdown on Runway 05, when propeller reverse was selected, the aircraft veered to the left. The crew attempted to regain directional control; however, the aircraft departed the left side of the runway surface, entered an area of loose snow, traversed a shallow ditch, climbed a rocky embankment, and came to rest on its belly with all three landing gears collapsed. The crew and passengers exited the aircraft through the main door stairway and the over-wing exits. There were no reported injuries. The accident occurred during daylight hours at 0834 central standard time.
Probable cause:
Findings as to Causes and Contributing Factors:
1. The left engine fuel control support assembly failed in fatigue and released one of three attachment bolts, which resulted in a slight displacement of the fuel control and changed the propeller control dimension. As a result, Beta pressure was achieved and propeller reverse was available for the left engine before it was available for the right engine.
2. The pilot selected thrust reverse without confirmation that the Beta lights were on for both engines, and the aircraft veered from the runway, most likely as a result of temporary asymmetric thrust.
Finding as to Risk:
1. There is no requirement to include the Beta light call as part of the pre-landing briefing. Briefing this item would remind the pilots of the need to confirm Beta light activation for both engines before application of thrust reverse.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 208B Super Cargomaster in Winnipeg: 1 killed

Date & Time: Oct 6, 2005 at 0543 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FEXS
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Winnipeg – Thunder Bay
MSN:
208B-0542
YOM:
1996
Flight number:
FDX8060
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
4570
Captain / Total hours on type:
1500.00
Aircraft flight hours:
6724
Circumstances:
On the day before the occurrence, the accident aircraft arrived in Winnipeg, Manitoba, on a flight from Thunder Bay, Ontario. The aircraft was parked in a heated hangar overnight and was pulled outside at about 0410 central daylight time. The pilot reviewed the weather information and completed planning for the flight, which was estimated to take two hours and six minutes. The aircraft was refuelled and taxied to Apron V at the Winnipeg International Airport, where it was loaded with cargo. After loading was complete, the pilot obtained an instrument flight rules (IFR) clearance for the flight to Thunder Bay, taxied to Runway 36, received take-off clearance, and departed. The aircraft climbed on runway heading for about one minute to an altitude of 1300 feet above sea level (asl), 500 feet above ground level (agl). The flight was cleared to 9000 feet asl direct to Thunder Bay, and the pilot turned on course. The aircraft continued to climb, reaching a maximum altitude of 2400 feet asl about 2.5 minutes after take-off. The aircraft then started a gradual descent averaging about 400 feet per minute (fpm) until it descended below radar coverage. The accident occurred during hours of darkness at 0543. The Winnipeg Fire Paramedic Service were notified and responded from a nearby station.
Probable cause:
Findings as to Causes and Contributing Factors:
1. The aircraft departed at a weight exceeding the maximum take-off weight and the maximum weight for operation in icing conditions.
2. After departure from Winnipeg, the aircraft encountered in-flight icing conditions in which the aircraftís performance deteriorated until the aircraft was unable to maintain altitude.
3. During the attempt to return to the Winnipeg International Airport, the pilot lost control of the aircraft, likely with little or no warning, at an altitude from which recovery was not possible.
Findings as to Risk:
1. Aviation weather forecasts incorporate generic icing forecasts that may not accurately predict the effects of icing conditions on particular aircraft. As a result, specific aircraft types may experience more significant detrimental effects from icing than forecasts indicate.
2. Bulk loading prevented determining the cargo weight in each zone, resulting in a risk that the individual zone weight limits could have been exceeded.
3. The aircraftís centre of gravity (CG) could not be accurately determined, and may have been in the extrapolated shaded warning area on the CG limit chart. Although it was determined that the CG was likely forward of the maximum allowable aft CG, bulk loading increased the risk that the CG could have exceeded the maximum allowable aft CG.
4. The incorrect tare weight on the Toronto cargo container presented a risk that other aircraft carrying cargo from that container could have been inadvertently overloaded.
Other Findings:
1. The pilotís weather information package was incomplete and had to be updated by a telephone briefing.
2. The operatorís pilots were not pressured to avoid using aircraft de-icing facilities or to depart with aircraft unserviceabilities.
3. The aircraft departed Winnipeg without significant contamination of its critical surfaces.
4. The biological material on board the aircraft was disposed of after the accident, with no indication that any of the material had been released into the ground or the atmosphere.
5. The fact that the aircraft was not equipped with flight data recorder or cockpit voice recorder equipment limited the information available for the occurrence investigation and the scope of the investigation.
Final Report:

Crash of a Swearingen SA226TC Metro II in Thompson

Date & Time: May 10, 2005 at 1030 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FKEX
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
York Landing – Thompson
MSN:
TC-332
YOM:
1980
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
15
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
erimeter Aviation flight 914, a Metro II with 17 people on board, was on approach at Thompson, MB. The first officer flew the aircraft during the approach, and encountered turbulence and fluctuating airspeed. The captain took control at 200 feet agl. The aircraft was high and left of centreline. The captain added power, continued the approach and landed hard on runway 23 near the intersection with runway 32. After the aircraft arrived at the apron, a fuel leak was noted. The aircraft was inspected and damage was found in the wheel wells, wing leading edge, engine mounts and a wing-fuselage attachment point. No injuries were reported. Reported winds at 1400Z were 010 at 15-20 kts; 1500Z winds were 350 at 9 kts.