Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver off Sechelt

Date & Time: Jul 30, 2019 at 1248 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
C-GPZP
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Vancouver - Pender Harbour
MSN:
722
YOM:
1954
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
En route from Vancouver to Pender Harbour, the pilot encountered engine problems and elected to ditch the aircraft about three miles off Sechelt. All three occupants were able to evacuate the cabin before the aircraft sank and was lost. All three occupants were rescued.

Crash of a Cessna 208 Caravan 675 on Addenbroke Island: 4 killed

Date & Time: Jul 26, 2019 at 1104 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GURL
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Vancouver - Calvert Island
MSN:
208-0501
YOM:
2008
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
En route from Vancouver Seaplane Base to Calvert Island, the single engine seaplane crashed in unknown circumstances in a hilly and wooded terrain located on Addenbroke Island, east of Calvert Island. Four occupants were killed while five others were injured.

Crash of a Swearingen SA226TC Metro II near Mount Seymour: 2 killed

Date & Time: Apr 13, 2015 at 0708 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GSKC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Vancouver - Prince George
MSN:
TC-235
YOM:
1977
Flight number:
CA066
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The aircraft departed Vancouver Airport at 0702LT on a cargo flight to Prince George and disappeared from radar screens six minutes later. The wreckage was eventually spotted a day later on the slope of a mountain located near Mount Seymour, northeast of Vancouver. A fuselage and a wing have been found, but nothing else according to a JRCC official.

Crash of a Beechcraft King Air A100 in Vancouver: 2 killed

Date & Time: Oct 27, 2011 at 1612 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GXRX
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Vancouver - Kelowna
MSN:
B-036
YOM:
1970
Flight number:
NTA204
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
13876
Captain / Total hours on type:
978.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1316
Copilot / Total hours on type:
85
Aircraft flight hours:
26993
Circumstances:
The Northern Thunderbird Air Incorporated Beechcraft King Air 100 (serial number B-36, registration C‑GXRX) departed Vancouver International Airport for Kelowna, British Columbia, with 7 passengers and 2 pilots on board. About 15 minutes after take-off, the flight diverted back to Vancouver because of an oil leak. No emergency was declared. At 1611 Pacific Daylight Time, when the aircraft was about 300 feet above ground level and about 0.5 statute miles from the runway, it suddenly banked left and pitched nose-down. The aircraft collided with the ground and caught fire before coming to rest on a roadway just outside of the airport fence. Passersby helped to evacuate 6 passengers; fire and rescue personnel rescued the remaining passenger and the pilots. The aircraft was destroyed, and all of the passengers were seriously injured. Both pilots succumbed to their injuries in hospital. The aircraft’s emergency locator transmitter had been removed.
Probable cause:
Findings as to causes and contributing factors:
During routine aircraft maintenance, it is likely that the left-engine oil-reservoir cap was left unsecured.
There was no complete preflight inspection of the aircraft, resulting in the unsecured engine oil-reservoir cap not being detected, and the left engine venting significant oil during operation.
A non-mandatory modification, designed to limit oil loss when the engine oil cap is left unsecure, had not been made to the engines.
Oil that leaked from the left engine while the aircraft was repositioned was pointed out to the crew, who did not determine its source before the flight departure.
On final approach, the aircraft slowed to below VREF speed. When power was applied, likely only to the right engine, the aircraft speed was below that required to maintain directional control, and it yawed and rolled left, and pitched down.
A partially effective recovery was likely initiated by reducing the right engine’s power; however, there was insufficient altitude to complete the recovery, and the aircraft collided with the ground.
Impact damage compromised the fuel system. Ignition sources resulting from metal friction, and possibly from the aircraft’s electrical system, started fires.
The damaged electrical system remained powered by the battery, resulting in arcing that may have ignited fires, including in the cockpit area.
Impact-related injuries sustained by the pilots and most of the passengers limited their ability to extricate themselves from the aircraft.
Findings as to risk:
Multi-engine−aircraft flight manuals and training programs do not include cautions and minimum control speeds for use of asymmetrical thrust in situations when an engine is at low power or the propeller is not feathered. There is a risk that pilots will not anticipate aircraft behavior when using asymmetrical thrust near or below unpublished critical speeds, and will lose control of the aircraft.
The company’s standard operating procedures lacked clear directions for how the aircraft was to be configured for the last 500 feet, or what to do if an approach is still unstable when 500 feet is reached, specifically in an abnormal situation. There is a demonstrated risk of accidents occurring as a result of unstabilized approaches below 500 feet above ground level.
Without isolation of the aircraft batteries following aircraft damage, there is a risk that an energized battery may ignite fires by electrical arcing.
Erroneous data used for weight-and-balance calculations can cause crews to inadvertently fly aircraft outside of the allowable center-of-gravity envelope.
Final Report:

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver off Saturna Island: 6 killed

Date & Time: Nov 28, 2009 at 1603 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GTMC
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Vancouver - Mayne Island - Pender Island - Saturna Island - Vancouver
MSN:
1171
YOM:
1958
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Captain / Total flying hours:
2800
Captain / Total hours on type:
2350.00
Circumstances:
The Seair Seaplanes Beaver was departing Lyall Harbour, Saturna Island, for the water aerodrome at the Vancouver International Airport, British Columbia. After an unsuccessful attempt at taking off downwind, the pilot took off into the wind towards Lyall Harbour. At approximately 1603 Pacific Standard Time, the aircraft became airborne, but remained below the surrounding terrain. The aircraft turned left, then descended and collided with the water. Persons nearby responded immediately; however, by the time they arrived at the aircraft, the cabin was below the surface of the water. There were 8 persons on board; the pilot and an adult passenger survived and suffered serious injuries. No signal from the emergency locator transmitter was heard.
Probable cause:
Findings as to Causes and Contributing Factors:
1. The combined effects of the atmospheric conditions and bank angle increased the load factor, causing an aerodynamic stall.
2. Due to the absence of a functioning stall warning system, in addition to the benign stalling characteristics of the Beaver, the pilot was not warned of the impending stall.
3. Because the aircraft was loaded in a manner that exceeded the aft CG limit, full stall recovery was compromised.
4. The altitude from which recovery was attempted was insufficient to arrest descent, causing the aircraft to strike the water.
5. Impact damage jammed 2 of the 4 doors, restricting egress from the sinking aircraft.
6. The pilot’s seat failed and he was unrestrained, contributing to the seriousness of his injuries and limiting his ability to assist passengers.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-31 Navajo Chieftain in Vancouver: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jul 9, 2009 at 2208 LT
Operator:
Registration:
C-GNAF
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Vancouver – Nanaimo – Victoria – Vancouver
MSN:
31-8052130
YOM:
1980
Flight number:
APEX511
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
2300
Copilot / Total flying hours:
400
Circumstances:
The Canadian Air Charters Piper PA-31-350 Chieftain (registration C-GNAF, serial number 31-8052130) was operating under visual flight rules as APEX 511 on the final leg of a multi-leg cargo flight from Vancouver to Nanaimo and Victoria, British Columbia, with a return to Vancouver. The weather was visual meteorological conditions and the last 9 minutes of the flight took place during official darkness. The flight was third for landing and turned onto the final approach course 1.5 nautical miles behind and 700 feet below the flight path of a heavier Airbus A321, approaching Runway 26 Right at the Vancouver International Airport. At 2208, Pacific Daylight Time, the target for APEX 511 disappeared from tower radar. The aircraft impacted the ground in an industrial area of Richmond, British Columbia, 3 nautical miles short of the runway. There was a post-impact explosion and fire. The 2 crew members on board were fatally injured. There was property damage, but no injuries on the ground. The onboard emergency locator transmitter was destroyed in the accident and no signal was detected.
Probable cause:
APEX 511 turned onto the final approach course within the wake turbulence area behind and below the heavier aircraft (Airbus A321) and encountered its wake, resulting in an upset and loss of control at an altitude that precluded recovery. The proximity of the faster trailing traffic limited the space available for APEX 511 to join the final approach course, requiring APEX 511 not to lag too far behind the preceding aircraft.
Final Report:

Crash of a Grumman G-21A Goose in Thormanby Island: 7 killed

Date & Time: Nov 16, 2008 at 1032 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FPCK
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Vancouver - Powell River
MSN:
1187
YOM:
1942
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Captain / Total flying hours:
12000
Captain / Total hours on type:
8000.00
Circumstances:
At about 1013 Pacific Standard Time, the amphibious Grumman G-21A (registration C-FPCK, serial number 1187), operated by Pacific Coastal Airlines, departed from the water aerodrome at the south terminal of the Vancouver International Airport, British Columbia, with one pilot and seven passengers for a flight to Powell River, British Columbia. Approximately 19 minutes later, the aircraft crashed in dense fog on South Thormanby Island, about halfway between Vancouver and Powell River. Local searchers located a seriously injured passenger on the eastern shoreline of the island at about 1400. The aircraft was located about 30 minutes later, on a peak near Spyglass Hill, British Columbia. The pilot and the six other passengers were fatally injured, and the aircraft was destroyed by impact and post-crash fire. The emergency locator transmitter was destroyed and did not transmit.
Probable cause:
The pilot likely departed and continued flight in conditions that were below visual flight rules (VFR) weather minima.
The pilot continued his VFR flight into instrument meteorological conditions (IMC), and did not recognize his proximity to terrain until seconds before colliding with Thormanby Island, British Columbia.
The indication of a marginal weather improvement at Powell River, British Columbia, and incorrect information from Merry Island, British Columbia, may have contributed to the pilot’s conclusion that weather along the route would be sufficient for a low-level flight.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-31 Navajo Chieftain in Revelstoke

Date & Time: Apr 23, 2007 at 1421 LT
Operator:
Registration:
C-GVSG
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Vancouver-Revelstoke
MSN:
31-418
YOM:
1969
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The pilot and the passenger, a photographer, left Vancouver at 0911LT with 5.5 hours of fuel to conduct a VFR aerial photographic flight in the Arrow Lakes area. At 1420LT, the aircraft entered the circuit at Revelstoke airport to refuel and to allow the photographer to change camera film. The pilot reportedly selected the landing gear down as the aircraft turned base and heard the gear clunk into position. When the aircraft turned final however, the red in-transit light was illuminated and the nose gear was not visible in the mirror. The pilot selected the gear lever up and down a couple of times but the gear did not extend. When the pilot advanced the throttles to conduct an overshoot, both engines surged and sputtered. The pilot retarded the throttles and conducted a gear-up landing in a grassy area off the end of runway 30. During the landing, the dry 8-inch high grass caught fire; the pilot and the photographer escaped from the aircraft but the aircraft was destroyed by ground fire.

Crash of a Piper PA-31 Navajo Chieftain in Powell River: 1 killed

Date & Time: Mar 8, 2006 at 1639 LT
Operator:
Registration:
C-GNAY
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Vancouver-Powell River
MSN:
31-8052095
YOM:
1980
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
1200
Copilot / Total flying hours:
500
Circumstances:

The crew was making a cargo flight from Vancouver to Powell River. The first landing attempt was abandonned and on the second landing on runway 09, the twin engine aircraft overran runway and crashed into a ravine. The copilot was killed while the captain was seriously injured. Weather conditions variable at the time of the accident.

Crash of a Cessna 208 Caravan in Port Alberni: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jan 21, 2006 at 1420 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GRXZ
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Tofino-Vancouver
MSN:
208-0469
YOM:
1995
Flight number:
RXX604
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
2480
Captain / Total hours on type:
750.00
Circumstances:
On a flight from Tofino to Vancouver, the pilot informed ATC about technical problem and decided to divert to Port Alberni Airport. The single engine aircraft crashed 10 km from this airport. 3 passengers were killed.