Crash of a Grumman G-21A Goose in Lost Trail: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jun 17, 2014 at 1700 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N888GG
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Salmon - Hamilton
MSN:
B-70
YOM:
1944
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
9800
Captain / Total hours on type:
50.00
Aircraft flight hours:
6394
Circumstances:
The airline transport pilot was repositioning the airplane to an airport near the owner's summer home. The airplane was not maintained for instrument flight, and the pilot had diverted the day before the accident due to weather. On the day of the accident, the pilot departed for the destination, but returned shortly after due to weather. After waiting for the weather conditions to improve, the pilot departed again that afternoon, and refueled the airplane at an intermediate airport before continuing toward the destination. The route of flight followed a highway that traversed a mountain pass. A witness located along the highway stated that he saw the accident airplane traveling northbound toward the mountain pass, below the overcast cloud layer. He also stated that the mountain pass was obscured, and he could see a thunderstorm developing toward the west, which was moving east toward the pass. A second witness, located near the accident site, saw the airplane descend vertically from the base of the clouds while spinning in a level attitude and impact the ground. The second witness reported that it was snowing and that the visibility was about ¼ mile at the time of the accident. The airplane impacted terrain in a level attitude, and was consumed by a postcrash fire. Examination of the flight controls, airframe, and engine revealed no mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. It is likely that the pilot experienced spatial disorientation and a subsequent loss of aircraft control upon encountering instrument meteorological conditions. The airplane exceeded its critical angle of attack and entered a flat spin at low altitude, resulting in an uncontrolled descent and impact with terrain.
Probable cause:
The pilot's decision to continue flight into deteriorating weather conditions in an airplane not maintained for instrument flight, which resulted in a loss of control due to spatial
disorientation.

Crash of a Grumman G-21A Goose in Al Ain: 4 killed

Date & Time: Feb 27, 2011 at 2007 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N221AG
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Al Ain - Riyadh
MSN:
1240
YOM:
1944
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Aircraft flight hours:
9912
Circumstances:
On February 27th, 2011, at approximately At 12:12:20 the crew of McKinnon G-21, registration N221AG Aircraft called Al Ain International Airport tower landline advising evening departure outbound to Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. After conversation, the aerodrome controller (“ADC”) asked the Aircraft about the estimated time of departure, the crew answered that it would be at 1400, the ADC confirmed that the estimated time of departure (“ETD”) will be changed to 1400 (UTC), subsequently the ADC asked if the Aircraft is going to do a test flight before the departure to the destination, the crew answered that they haven’t flown the Aircraft for a while and they wanted to stay in the pattern before takeoff to the cleared route. Accordingly the ADC offered the crew to fly in the circuit until it becomes ready to depart, the crew accepted the advised pattern and informed the ADC that they won’t shutdown the engine nor they want to land thus, according to the crew advice to the ADC, the Aircraft would stay in the circuit and go straight from there to the cleared route. At 13:53:15, the ADC called one of the crew on the landline who on his turn advised that they need one more hour waiting for fuel. At 15:46:48, the Aircraft called the ground movement controller (“GMC”) asking for IFR clearance to Riyadh, the GMC replied the Aircraft that they would not do a local circuit and would be going ahead and pick up IFR flight plan. The Aircraft asked to do one circuit in the pattern, if available, approach then accept the tower clearance to Riyadh. The GMC advised the Aircraft to expect a left closed traffic not above two thousand feet and to standby for a clearance; the Aircraft read back the instructions correctly. At 15:50:46, the Aircraft reported engine starting then requested taxi clearance, the GMC cleared the Aircraft to the holding point of Runway (“RWY”) 19 and advised QNH 1014, the GMC advised also that the Aircraft should expect a left hand closed traffic not above 2000 feet VFR, the GMC also advised the Aircraft to request for your IFR clearance with tower once airborne, the Aircraft read back the instructions correctly. At 15:53:41, the GMC read the squawk to the Aircraft which was confirmed by the Pilot correctly. Thereafter, the Aircraft was instructed to taxi to RWY 19 holding point, and, after completion of the closed circuit, cleared to destination via ROVOS flight planned route on departure runway one nine be a right turn maintain six thousand feet, the Aircraft read back the instruction correctly. At 16:02:38, the Aircraft called the ADC advising ready for departure RWY 19 closed circuit, the ADC instructed to hold position and to confirm one circuit, the Aircraft affirmed one circuit a low approach and then IFR to Riyadh. At 16:03:53, the ADC instructed the Aircraft to line up and wait RWY 19. At 16:05:37, the ADC cleared the Aircraft for takeoff and read the surface wind as 180 degrees 7 knots and to report downwind, the Aircraft read back the instructions correctly. The Aircraft started the takeoff acceleration normally, with four persons onboard, until shortly after liftoff, and during initial climb, the Aircraft veered to left towards the ground of taxiway “F”, between Taxiway Kilo and Lima where it impacted at approximately 1607 with down nose and left roll attitude. The Aircraft went for a distance of approximately 32 meters until came to a complete stop. The Aircraft was destroyed by the impact and subsequent fire. All occupants were fatally injured.
Probable cause:
Still under investigation.
Final Report:

Crash of a Grumman G-21A Goose in Thormanby Island: 7 killed

Date & Time: Nov 16, 2008 at 1032 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FPCK
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Vancouver - Powell River
MSN:
1187
YOM:
1942
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Captain / Total flying hours:
12000
Captain / Total hours on type:
8000.00
Circumstances:
At about 1013 Pacific Standard Time, the amphibious Grumman G-21A (registration C-FPCK, serial number 1187), operated by Pacific Coastal Airlines, departed from the water aerodrome at the south terminal of the Vancouver International Airport, British Columbia, with one pilot and seven passengers for a flight to Powell River, British Columbia. Approximately 19 minutes later, the aircraft crashed in dense fog on South Thormanby Island, about halfway between Vancouver and Powell River. Local searchers located a seriously injured passenger on the eastern shoreline of the island at about 1400. The aircraft was located about 30 minutes later, on a peak near Spyglass Hill, British Columbia. The pilot and the six other passengers were fatally injured, and the aircraft was destroyed by impact and post-crash fire. The emergency locator transmitter was destroyed and did not transmit.
Probable cause:
The pilot likely departed and continued flight in conditions that were below visual flight rules (VFR) weather minima.
The pilot continued his VFR flight into instrument meteorological conditions (IMC), and did not recognize his proximity to terrain until seconds before colliding with Thormanby Island, British Columbia.
The indication of a marginal weather improvement at Powell River, British Columbia, and incorrect information from Merry Island, British Columbia, may have contributed to the pilot’s conclusion that weather along the route would be sufficient for a low-level flight.
Final Report:

Crash of a Grumman G-21A Goose in Port Hardy: 5 killed

Date & Time: Aug 3, 2008 at 0722 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GPCD
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Port Hardy-Chamiss Bay
MSN:
B076
YOM:
1944
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
3998
Captain / Total hours on type:
500.00
Circumstances:

Ten minutes after take off, enroute to Chamiss Bay, the vintage aircraft crashed. Two passengers were rescued few hours later while all 5 other occupants were killed. It appears the pilot was flying at too low altitude under cloud and did not distinguish the mountain.

Crash of a Grumman G-21A Goose in Unalaska

Date & Time: Apr 9, 2008 at 1630 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N741
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Akutan - Unalaska
MSN:
B097
YOM:
1944
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
7040
Captain / Total hours on type:
320.00
Aircraft flight hours:
12228
Circumstances:
On landing, the aircraft hit a truck crossing the runway threshold. The aircraft crashed on runway and was damaged beyond repair. It appears that the pilot activated the warning system, which should have triggered the lights and the gate but due to a technical problem, the gate did not function properly, so the truck driver decided to cross the runway at the time the aircraft was landing.

Crash of a Grumman G-21A Goose in Marathon

Date & Time: Jan 29, 2008 at 1723 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N21A
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Marathon-Marathon
MSN:
B129
YOM:
1946
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:

The pilot was practicing takeoffs and landings of Marathon. During the water landing, the left wing contacted the water and the airplane water looped. Both occupants were seriously injured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Grumman G-21A Goose in New York

Date & Time: Feb 15, 2005 at 0942 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N327
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Penn Yan-Penn Yan
MSN:
1051
YOM:
1939
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
17573
Captain / Total hours on type:
46.00
Aircraft flight hours:
8825
Circumstances:
The crew was performing a training flight. After takeoff from runway 19, while flying at 600 feet, the instructor reduced power on right engine. The aircraft lost altitude and crashed in flames. Both occupants were injured and the aircraft was destroyed by post impact fire.

Crash of a Grumman G-21A Goose in Fort Lauderdale: 1 killed

Date & Time: Mar 25, 1999 at 1139 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N5548A
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Watson Island - Fort Lauderdale
MSN:
1150
YOM:
1942
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
10000
Captain / Total hours on type:
520.00
Aircraft flight hours:
13136
Circumstances:
The pilot was receiving a competency flight in the seaplane from an FAA inspector. The pilot was returning to their initial departure airport, descended to 1,000 feet, contacted the control tower for landing instructions, and was instructed to enter on a right base. Before he could acknowledge the landing instructions the engines started to make loud, rough, and unusual noises. The pilot informed the control tower that he was 2 miles south , declared an emergency, and stated he had a bad engine on the left side. The FAA inspector stated the pilot started the emergency procedure, the manifold pressure and rpm was fluctuating. The inspector could not determine the dead engine by the dead foot, dead engine method, because her rudder pedals were stowed. She pointed out a pasture and the pilot stated they were going to the water. She did not recall the pilot shutting down the engine or feathering the propeller. She could not recall the final seconds of the flight. The airplane collided with a tree, canal bank, and came to rest inverted in the canal. Examination of the airframe and flight control systems revealed no evidence of a precrash mechanical failure or malfunction. Examination of the left propeller revealed it was not feathered. The No. 6 front forward spark plug ignition lead was disconnected from the spark plug. The ignition lead shroud threaded coupling on the No. 4 front forward spark plug was unscrewed and the carbon wire was exposed. The left and right engines were removed from the airplane and transported to an authorized FAA approved repair station. The left engine was placed in an engine test cell. The engine was started, developed rated power, and achieved takeoff power. The spark plug lead was removed from the No.6 forward cylinder. The left magneto had a 125 rpm drop during the magneto check. The right magneto had a 75 rpm drop. The magneto drop exceeded the allowable drop indicated by the engine overhaul manual. The right engine was placed in a engine test cell. The engine was started, developed rated power, and achieved takeoff power. Review of the FAA inspectors FAA Form 4040.6 revealed she was not Event Based Current (EBC) for the 4th quarter of the Flight Standards EBC program, and she did not meet the EBC quarterly events required by the end of the 14-day grace period. FAA Order 4040.9 states for an FAA inspector to be eligible / assigned to perform flight certification job function they must be EBC current., and inspectors should not accept assignments without being in compliance with the FAA Order. Managers and supervisors should not assign inspectors who are not current. The FAA inspector's supervisor was aware that the inspector was not current. He contacted the FAA Safety Regulation Branch, FAA Southern Region Headquarters, and stated that FAA Southern Region indicated that the inspector could administer the checkride. FAA Southern Region stated at no time did they approve or agree to an operation outside the parameters of the FAR's, Inspector Handbook or FAA Order.
Probable cause:
The pilots failure to correctly identify an in-flight emergency (fluctuating manifold pressure and rpm due to a disconnected spark plug lead / unscrewed ignition lead shroud) and failure to complete the engine shutdown procedure once it was initiated (propeller not feathered). This resulted in a forced landing and subsequent in-flight collision with a tree, dirt bank and canal. Contributing to the accident was the FAA inspectors improper supervision of the pilot, and the improper supervision of the inspector by her supervisor, in his failure to follow written procedures / directives in assigning a non-current inspector to conduct a competency flight.
Final Report:

Crash of a Grumman G-21A Goose near Dutch Harbor: 2 killed

Date & Time: Aug 11, 1996 at 1615 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N660PA
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Anderson Bay - Dutch Harbor
MSN:
B138
YOM:
1945
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
20000
Captain / Total hours on type:
8000.00
Aircraft flight hours:
13381
Circumstances:
On August 11, 1996, about 1615 Alaska daylight time, an amphibious Grumman G21-G, N660PA, is presumed to have been involved in a fatal accident about 20 miles south of Dutch Harbor, Alaska. The airplane was being operated as a visual flight rules (VFR) cross-country on demand passenger flight under Title 14 CFR Part 135 when the accident occurred. The airplane, registered to and operated by Peninsula Airways Inc., Anchorage, Alaska, is presumed to have been destroyed. The certificated airline transport pilot, and the sole passenger are presumed to have received fatal injuries. Low ceilings were reported in the area of departure by the operator. VFR company flight following procedures were in effect. The flight originated from Anderson Bay, on the Island of Unalaska, about 1610.
Probable cause:
Due to lack of evidences, the exact cause of the accident could not be determined.
Final Report: