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Crash of a Cessna 414A Chancellor in Colonia: 1 killed

Date & Time: Oct 29, 2019 at 1100 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N959MJ
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Leesburg - Linden
MSN:
414A-0471
YOM:
1980
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
While on approach to Linden Airport, NJ, the twin engine airplane went out of control and crashed in flames onto several houses located in Colonia, about three mile west of the airfield. The aircraft was destroyed and the pilot, sole on board was killed. At least three houses were destroyed by a post crash fire.

Crash of a Beechcraft King Air 100 in McAllen: 4 killed

Date & Time: Oct 26, 2009 at 1143 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N729MS
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Uvalde - Leesburg
MSN:
BE-002
YOM:
1976
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
550
Circumstances:
The pilot obtained three weather briefings before departure. At that time, the current weather along the route of flight showed significant convective activity and a moving squall line, and the forecast predicted significant thunderstorm activity along the planned route of flight. The pilot was concerned about the weather and mentioned that he would be looking for "holes" in the weather to maneuver around via the use of his on-board weather radar. He decided to fly a route further south to avoid the severe weather. Radar data indicates that, after departure, the pilot flew a southerly course that was west of the severe weather before he asked air traffic control for a 150-degree heading that would direct him toward a "hole" in the weather. A controller, who said he also saw a "hole" in the weather, told the pilot to fly a 120-degree heading and proceed direct to a fix along his route of flight. The airplane flew into a line of very heavy to intense thunderstorms during cruise flight at 25,000 feet before the airplane began to lose altitude and reverse course. The airplane then entered a rapid descent, broke up in flight, and subsequently impacted terrain. Review of recorded precipitation data showed that there was substantial information available to the controller about moderate to extreme weather along the aircraft’s route of flight. While the controller stated that he saw a hole or clear area ahead of the aircraft, this is contradicted by both the recorded data and the statement of a second controller working the D-position at the time of the accident. The first controller did not advise the pilot of the severe weather that was along this new course heading and the pilot entered severe weather and began to lose altitude. The controller queried the pilot about his altitude loss and the pilot mentioned that they had gotten into some "pretty good turbulence." This was the last communication from the pilot before the airplane disappeared from radar. Review of recorded precipitation data showed that there was substantial information available to the controller about moderate to extreme
weather along the aircraft’s route of flight. The controller did not provide advisories to the pilot regarding the adverse weather's immediate safety hazard to the accident flight as required by Federal Aviation Administration Order 7110.65. Examination of the recovered sections of flight control surfaces revealed that all of the fractures examined exhibited signs consistent with overstress failure. There was no evidence of preexisting cracking on any of the fracture surfaces examined and no preaccident anomalies were noted with the engines.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to avoid severe weather, and the air traffic controller's failure to provide adverse weather avoidance assistance, as required by Federal Aviation Administration directives, both of which led to the airplane's encounter with a severe thunderstorm and the subsequent loss of control and inflight breakup of the airplane.
Final Report:

Crash of a Raytheon 390 Premier I in Leesburg

Date & Time: Feb 12, 2008 at 2055 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N16DK
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Wichita - Leesburg
MSN:
RB-19
YOM:
2001
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
6000
Aircraft flight hours:
1584
Circumstances:
The business jet touched down near the threshold of the 5,500-foot-long, asphalt runway, at an airspeed of 100 knots. The pilot reported the braking effectiveness as "adequate" initially, and as the airplane approached the mid-field position of the runway, the braking effectiveness decreased until it was "near nil," and the airplane was no longer decelerating. The pilot maneuvered the airplane off the left side of the runway to gain traction from the adjacent grass area, during which it impacted a drainage ditch, resulting in substantial damage to the airplane. The area off the end of the runway was an open field with no obstructions. Examination of the runway revealed it was covered in black ice, with a thin layer of water. The weather reported at the time of the accident included 5 miles visibility with light snow. An employee of the fixed base operator (FBO) at the airport reported that at the time of the accident the main ramp and taxiways were coated with 1/4 to 1/2 inch of ice from earlier precipitation. The airport manager reported that, about 1.5 hours prior to the accident, when he was leaving for the day, the forecast was for little or no precipitation and the temperature was expected to increase. However, the temperature decreased instead, resulting in the formation of ice on the runway. The airport manager reported at the time of the accident the north end of runway 17 was dry; however, the south end of runway 17 had "some ice on it." The normal procedure for the airport to treat ice on the runway was to issue a NOTAM to close the runway and deploy their ice melt product. Then, they would cancel the NOTAM and issue another one stating that ice is present on the runway. Because the temperature was forecast to rise and not fall, the airport did not use any ice melt product on the runway. Additionally the airport personnel did not have the equipment or training to issue braking action reports, nor was it required. The pilot reported no pre-impact mechanical deficiencies with the airplane.
Probable cause:
The airplane's runway excursion during landing roll following an encounter with ice. Contributing to the accident was the ice-covered runway, and the airport personnel's lack of knowledge regarding the runway condition.
Final Report:

Crash of a Socata TBM-700 in Leesburg: 3 killed

Date & Time: Mar 1, 2003 at 1445 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N700PP
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Greenville - Leesburg
MSN:
059
YOM:
1992
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
730
Copilot / Total flying hours:
8375
Aircraft flight hours:
1049
Circumstances:
The private pilot, who sat in the left seat, was executing the LOC RWY 17 instrument approach in actual instrument meteorological conditions, when the airplane decelerated, lost altitude, and began a left turn about 2 miles from the airport. Subsequently, the airplane collided with terrain and came to rest on residential property. The radar data also indicated that the airplane was never stabilized on the approach. A witness, a private pilot, said the airplane "appeared" out of the fog about 300-400 feet above the ground. It was in a left bank, with the nose pointed down, and was traveling fast. The airplane then "simultaneously and suddenly level[ed] out," pitched up, and the engine power increased. The witness thought that the pilot realized he was low and was trying to "get out of there." The airplane descended in a nose-high attitude, about 65 degrees, toward the trees. Radar data indicates that the airplane slowed to 80 knots about 3 miles from the airplane, and then to 68 knots 18 seconds later as the airplane began to turn to the left. Examination of the airplane and engine revealed no mechanical deficiencies. Weather reported at the airport 25 minutes before the accident included wind from 140 degrees at 5 knots, visibility 1 statute mile, and ceiling 500 foot overcast. Weather 5 minutes before the accident included wind from 140 degrees at 5 knots, visibility 1 statute miles, and ceiling 300 foot overcast.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to fly a stabilized, published instrument approach procedure, and his failure to maintain adequate airspeed which led to an aerodynamic stall.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-61P Aerostar (Ted Smith 601P) in Waterford: 2 killed

Date & Time: Apr 27, 1997 at 2052 LT
Registration:
N885JC
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Allentown – Leesburg
MSN:
61-0826-8163434
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
1600
Captain / Total hours on type:
525.00
Circumstances:
During arrival at night, the flight was being controlled by a developmental controller (DC), who was being supervised by an instructor (IC). The pilot (plt) was instructed to descend & cross the STILL Intersection (Int) at 3,000 ft. STILL Int was aligned with the localizer (loc) approach (apch) course, 10.1 mi from the apch end of runway 17 (rwy 17); the final apch fix (FAF) was 3.9 mi from the rwy. About 5 mi before reaching STILL Int, while on course & level at 3,000 ft, the plt was cleared for a Loc Rwy 17 Apch. Radar data showed the aircraft (acft) continued to STILL Int, then it turned onto the loc course toward the FAF. Shortly after departing STILL Int, while inbound on the loc course, the acft began a descent. Before the acft reached the FAF, the DC issued a frequency change to go to UNICOM. During this transmission, the IC noticed a low altitude alert on the radar display, then issued a verbal low altitude alert, saying, 'check altitude, you should be at 1,500 ft (should have said '1,800 ft' as that was the minimum crossing altitude at the FAF), altitude's indicating 1,200, low altitude alert.' There was no response from the plt. This occurred about 2 mi before the FAF. Minimum descent altitude (MDA) for the apch was 720 ft. The acft struck tree tops at 750 ft, about 1/2 mi before the FAF. The IC's remark 'you should be at 1,500 ft' was based on an expired apch plate with a lower FAF minimum crossing altitude; the current minimum crossing altitude at the FAF was 1,800 ft. Apch control management had not made the current plate available to the controllers. Investigation could not determine whether a current apch plate would have prompted an earlier warning by the controllers.
Probable cause:
Failure of the pilot to follow the published instrument (IFR) approach procedure, by failing to maintain the minimum altitude for that segment of the approach.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-46-350P Malibu Mirage in Wilkes-Barre

Date & Time: Dec 15, 1993 at 1745 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N92GP
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Leesburg - Bedford
MSN:
46-22120
YOM:
1991
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
675
Captain / Total hours on type:
175.00
Aircraft flight hours:
206
Circumstances:
While cruising at FL240, the pilot observed the engine oil pressure gradually decrease from the normal to the caution range and a drop in manifold pressure. He requested and received vectors for a precautionary landing at an airport short of his destination. During the descent, the oil pressure continued to drop to zero and engine power was lost. He was able to locate the airport underneath the overcast, but loss of engine power prevented him from reaching the runway. The airplane impacted trees 1,200 feet from the airport. The 6 engine cylinder assemblies were changed 7 hours prior to the accident. Examination of the engine and turbochargers did not reveal the source of the oil loss.
Probable cause:
The loss of engine oil for undetermined reasons and the subsequent engine failure, resulting in a forced landing and collision with trees.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft C-45H Expeditor in Leesburg

Date & Time: Jan 21, 1983 at 1630 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N69K
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Leesburg - Leesburg
MSN:
AF-625
YOM:
1954
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
1575
Circumstances:
The aircraft crashed into a lake during a forced landing after the engines quit. The pilot-in-command had gone for a local flight with a pilot/passenger. After a few minutes of flight he announced that they did not have any fuel. The aircraft was on an approach to return when both engines began to cut out. The aircraft did not make the runway and impacted in the lake. The occupants were able to evacuate and were picked up by fishermen. The aircraft came to rest on the bottom of the lake. The aircraft had just completed a cross-country with the same pilot-in-command and no refueling was accomplished.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: loss of engine power (total) - nonmechanical
Phase of operation: approach - VFR pattern - final approach
Findings
1. (c) fuel supply - disregarded - pilot in command
2. (c) fluid, fuel - exhaustion
3. (c) fuel supply - inadequate - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #2: forced landing
Phase of operation: landing - flare/touchdown
----------
Occurrence #3: in flight collision with terrain/water
Phase of operation: landing - flare/touchdown
Final Report: