Crash of a Vickers 808 Viscount in Bristol

Date & Time: Sep 21, 1967 at 0859 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
EI-AKK
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Dublin - Bristol
MSN:
422
YOM:
1959
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
17
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
5005
Captain / Total hours on type:
1300.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
2200
Copilot / Total hours on type:
592
Aircraft flight hours:
18375
Circumstances:
Before leaving Dublin no landing forecast for Lulsgate was available but the forecast conditions for Filton, 10 miles north of Lulsgate, were well above the company minima of 260 ft critical height and 800 rn RVR. About 25 minutes before commencing the approach to land and whilst the aircraft was on the airway near Strumble, the latest weather conditions for Lulsgate obtained by radio from air traffic control, showed that there was 3/8 cloud at 1 000 ft, visibility was 1 500 m with the sun tending to disperse cloud and mist. After leaving the airway, the aircraft was positioned by Lulsgate radar for an approach to runway 28 on a right-hand base leg. At 0752 hours GMT before the final approach was commenced, the latest weather conditions were passed by the Lulsgate rabar controller who was also the approach controller, these conditions showed a surface wind northerly 8 to 10 kt, QFE 979, QNH 1 001, visibility in mist 1 800 m. During the final turn on to the approach at 6 miles, the aircraft drifted to the left of the extended centre line which was regained closing from left to right during the final descent. At five miles from touchdown, still to the left of the centre line, a descent from 1 500 ft (QFE) was commenced at a rate of 300 ft per mile with advisory altitudes being passed every half mile. The air was calm and the commander was able to achieve a high degree of precision during the approach; heights were accurately flown during the descent and the aircraft's track, cow verging on the centre line, was steady, When the aircraft was between 3 and 34 miles from touchdown, the controller informed it that visibility had deteriorated to 1 200 m. At two miles, when steering 2950, the aircraft intercepted the approach centre line and its heading was corrected to 290°; at one and a half miles at 500 ft, a further heading correction was made on to 287°. A drift to the right, away from the centre line, became apparent when the aircraft was between 1 and 12 miles from touchdown and the controller gave further corrections to the left to 285° and 280°. At one mile from touchdown at 350 feet, a further left correction to 275° was given but the aircraft continued to track to the right of the centre line. At half a mile from touchdown, when the talk-down was complete, the controller informed the aircraft it was well to the right of the centre line and that it should overshoot if the runway was not in sight. Shortly afterwards the aircraft was seen, by a controller, heading towards the control tower before commencing its corrective turn to the left. The commander, who was at the controls of the aircraft, said it was possible to refer to the ground and natural horizon until passing through about 650 ft when a thin layer of cloud followed by misty conditions required the remainder of the approach to be made on instruments. Whilst descending through 300 ft, the commander asked the co-pilot if he could see anything but just as he replied in the negative the commander saw the approach lights ahead and to his left and he promptly commenced an 'St turn to line up with them. As he did so he called for 400 of flap and less power in order to reduce the airspeed from 130 kt to about 112 kt. During this phase, he lost contact with the lights "for some seconds" but he elected to continue the approach because the last reported visibility was 1 200 rn and he was confident the runway lights would shortly appear ahead. When they came into view the aircraft was over the left-hand side of the runway and not properly aligned with it; the commander said he attempted to turn on to the runway centre line as he flared out for the landing. During this manoeuvre, although he was not aware of it, the starboard wing tip and No. 4 propeller struck the runway; the aircraft then touched down on all its wheels with considerable port drift. The commander took overshoot action, applying full power, calling for 20° of flap and the undercarriage to be raised; the airspeed had, in the meanwhile, fallen below 100 kt. The commander realised that the aircraft was not accelerating normally and saw that it was headed towards buildings on the northern perimeter of the aerodrome; rather than risk flying into these obstructions, he flew the aircraft on to the ground with its undercarriagi retracting. The aircraft touched down starboard wing first, ground-looped tb the right as it slid along the remaining section of the adjacent runway, then crashed tail first through a fence. Ten of the occupants of the passenger cabin were injured, three of them seriously; fire did not break out; rescue and fire vehicles arrived promptly on the scene. The accident occurred at 0759 hours.
Probable cause:
The accident was caused by an attempt to align the aircraft with the runway at too low a height following the commander's incorrect decision to continue the approach when visual guidance became obscured below critical height. A crash landing became necessary during an attempted overshoot after the aircraft had touched the ground and sustained damage during a turn at a low height.
Final Report:

Crash of a Vickers 803 Viscount in Ashbourne: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jun 22, 1967 at 0835 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
EI-AOF
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Dublin - Dublin
MSN:
176
YOM:
1957
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Aircraft flight hours:
17447
Circumstances:
The Viscount had departed Dublin at 06:44 GMT for a pilot conversion training flight on an IFR flight plan. The instructor planned to spend 2 hours in a sector NW of Dublin, followed by practicing circuits and landings for one hour. Eyewitnesses reported seeing the aircraft entering a vertical dive from low altitude. The plane crashed and caught fire. All three crew members were killed.
Source: ASN
Probable cause:
An unintentional stall and incipient spin at a low altitude from which recovery was not possible. There is not enough evidence to determine the circumstances leading to the stall and incipient spin but the behaviour of the aircraft in the final stages was such as to indicate that it was not under control of the flight instructor.

Crash of a Bristol 170 Freighter 31E in Dublin: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jun 12, 1967 at 1758 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
EI-APM
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Glasgow - Dublin
MSN:
13076
YOM:
1951
Flight number:
QT612
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
Upon landing on runway 17 at Dublin Airport, the airplane seemed to be uncontrollable and bounced 3-4 times. The captain decided to abandon the landing, attempted a go around and increased engine power. After takeoff, while climbing to a height of approximately 50 feet, the airplane turned to the left when it stalled and crashed onto a hangar. The aircraft was destroyed and both crew members were killed. There were no injuries on the ground.
Probable cause:
The reason why the aircraft bounced on landing could not be determined with certainty. However, it was understood that the left engine partially lost power or failed during initial climb for unknown reason. This caused the aircraft to stall and to crash as the failure occurred at a critical stage of flight (low speed and low altitude).

Crash of a Lockheed L-749A-79 Constellation in Addis Ababa: 1 killed

Date & Time: Oct 2, 1964
Operator:
Registration:
LX-IOK
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Dublin – Addis-Ababa
MSN:
2562
YOM:
1947
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
7
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
After touchdown at Addis-Ababa-Bole, following an uneventful cargo flight from Dublin, the airplane went out of control, veered off runway and came to rest. The captain was killed in the accident while six other crew members were injured. It is believed that control was lost while the pilot was attempting a go around manoeuvre for unknown reason. While increasing power on all four engines, they stopped simultaneously, causing the aircraft to crash.

Crash of a Douglas DC-4-1009 in Dublin

Date & Time: Sep 19, 1961 at 2104 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-ARJY
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Tarbes – Dublin
MSN:
10288
YOM:
1944
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
69
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
6049
Captain / Total hours on type:
402.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
14000
Copilot / Total hours on type:
4200
Aircraft flight hours:
31458
Circumstances:
G-ARJY was flying a chartered non- scheduled trip from Speke Airport, Liverpool to Tarbes Airport, Lourdes where passengers were to embark for Dublin, Ireland, Following a normal flight to Lourdes the aircraft was refuelled. The amount taken on appeared to be sufficient for the flight to Dublin. The aircraft was carrying 4 crew and 69 passengers. Take- off for Dublin was at 1710 hours, and the flight to Dublin Approach was uneventful. At 2035 the aircraft reported to Dublin Air Traffic Control and was informed of the local weather and of the runway in use. Subsequently, at 2058, it was cleared to land on runway 24, and the captain stated that he intended to make a visual approach. Shortly thereafter, at 2104 the flight reported having difficulty and that it was losing power. The captain abandoned the approach, swung the aircraft abruptly to the left and made a successful emergency wheels-up landing away from the airport. There was no fire. Although some occupants were slightly injured and shocked, there were no fatalities or serious injuries.
Probable cause:
The accident was attributed to incorrect management of the fuel system by the flight crew which resulted in partial Loss of power and control and a forced landing outside the airport.
Final Report:

Crash of a Vickers 802 Viscount in London

Date & Time: Jan 7, 1960
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-AOHU
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Dublin – London
MSN:
169
YOM:
1957
Region:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
54
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Upon landing, the nose gear collapsed. The airplane skidded for about 500 yards before coming to rest in flames. All 59 occupants were evacuated safely while the aircraft was destroyed by a post crash fire.
Probable cause:
The failure of Air Traffic Control to notify the captain of a critical deterioration in runway Visual Range during his final approach. In consequence he attempted to land in a visibility which gave him insufficient visual reference with the result that the nosewheels contacted the runway before the mainwheels thereby overstressing the nose wheel unit and fracturing its attachments.

Crash of a De Havilland DH.89A Dragon Rapide in Simonburn

Date & Time: Feb 19, 1954
Registration:
G-AFMF
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Newcastle – Dublin
MSN:
6432
YOM:
1938
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Ten minutes after his departure from Newcastle Airport, the pilot encountered severe icing conditions and the leading edge were contaminated with ice. At an altitude of 3,200 feet and while in a flat attitude, the twin engine aircraft hit the ground and crashed in fire. All eight occupants were seriously injured while the aircraft was destroyed.
Probable cause:
It was determined that the pilot failed to prepare the flight according to procedures as he started the mission without any information about weather conditions along the route. Thus, he was unaware of the icing conditions. It was also reported that the aircraft was not equipped with deice/anti-ice systems, which was against the regulations and considered as a contributory factor.
Final Report:

Crash of a Douglas DC-3D in Spernall

Date & Time: Jan 1, 1953 at 1100 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
EI-ACF
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Dublin – Birmingham
MSN:
42957
YOM:
1946
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
22
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
7303
Captain / Total hours on type:
3369.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
3599
Copilot / Total hours on type:
2668
Aircraft flight hours:
10968
Circumstances:
Christened 'St Kieran', the aircraft left Dublin at 0936LT Bound for Birmingham, carrying 22 passengers and a crew of three. While cruising at an altitude of 5,000 feet, both engines lost power. The crew decided to make an emergency landing and the aircraft came to rest in a field located in Spernall. It was damaged beyond repair while all 25 occupants were evacuated safely, except for the copilot who was injured.
Probable cause:
The primary cause of the accident was loss of engine power due to fuel starvation. The Inquiry found that this was caused by selecting the port engine to the right main tank to which the starboard engine was also selected. The loss of engine power alone was the sole cause of the accident, which could have been avoided had the crew diagnosed the cause of the trouble and changed the fuel feed to another tank. The failure to diagnose fuel starvation was probably due to the circumstances: i.e. first, the lack of coordinated effort by the Captain and First Officer after the engines cut; second, the knowledge of the crew that ample fuel for the flight was on board and their belief that the engines were drawing from their respective main tanks. The actual forced landing of the aircraft in conditions of low cloud, poor forward visibility and unfavorable terrain was skilfully executed and resulted in the passengers escaping unharmed.
Final Report:

Crash of a Douglas C-47B-35-DK Dakota III in Dolwyddelan: 23 killed

Date & Time: Jan 10, 1952 at 1915 LT
Operator:
Registration:
EI-AFL
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Northolt – Dublin
MSN:
16699/33447
YOM:
1945
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
20
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
23
Circumstances:
At 1725LT, the aircraft christened 'Saint Kevin' took off from Northolt Airport en route for Dublin, carrying a crew of three and twenty passengers. The flight was without incident as far as Welshpool. The intended course from this point onwards until the coast was reached at a point near Harlech, lay over the Welsh mountains with heights rising to about 3,000 feet. At 1855LT the 'Saint Kevin', which throughout was flying under Instrument Flight Rules, asked and received permission from Preston Air Traffic Control to ascend from 4,500 feet which was the planned height of the flight, to 6,500 feet, being the next authorized level for westbound flights on this route. No reason was given for this request. At about 1912LT the aircraft reported its position to be over Nevin. At some time between 1912LT and 1915LT, the 'Saint Kevin', having changed to the Dublin frequency requested descent clearance. Dublin acknowledged this request and granted clearance which was not acknowledged. No further radio messages were received. At about 1915LT the aircraft crashed approximately 18 nautical miles from Nevin Beacon in a northerly direction, at a point about 4 nautical miles ESE from the summit of Snowdon. All 23 occupants lost their lives.
Probable cause:
The cause of the accident could not be determined with certainty. However, investigators concluded that the combination of several factors contributed to the accident, such as weather conditions (clouds, icing, turbulences), pilot decision, evaluation of the situation in flight, flight conditions, etc. Please refer to the final report below.
Final Report:

Crash of an Avro 689 Tudor 5 in RAF Llandow: 80 killed

Date & Time: Mar 12, 1950 at 1450 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-AKBY
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Dublin – Llandow
MSN:
1417
YOM:
1947
Region:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
78
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
80
Circumstances:
The four engine aircraft was performing a charter flight from Dublin to RAF Llandow, carrying rugby fans who should attend a match between Ireland and Wales for the Five Nations Tournament. On final approach to RAF Llandow, at an altitude of 150 feet, the pilot increased power and the aircraft climbed to 300 feet and then adopted a 35° nose-up attitude. Out of control, it stalled and crashed in a field located 2,500 feet short of runway 28 threshold. All five crew members and 75 passengers were killed. Only three passengers were rescued, placing this tragedy as the most dramatic plane crash up to date.
Probable cause:
The loading conditions of the aircraft which gave a centre of gravity position too far aft and outside the limit in the relevant Certificate of Airworthiness and therefore insufficient elevator control under conditions of low speed and acute instability. Also, the pilot in command, aged 25, did not have sufficient experience, which was considered as a contributory factor.