Ground fire of a Boeing 777-F60 in Shanghai

Date & Time: Jul 22, 2020 at 1520 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ET-ARH
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Shanghai – Addis Ababa – São Paulo – Santiago de Chile
MSN:
42031/1242
YOM:
2014
Flight number:
ET3739
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Parked at position 306 at Shanghai-Pudong Airport, the aircraft was prepared for a cargo service to Santiago de Chile with intermediate stops in Addis Ababa and São Paulo, when a fire erupted in the cargo compartment. The aircraft was partially destroyed by fire and damaged beyond repair. No one was injured.

Crash of a Boeing 737 MAX 8 near Debre Zeit: 157 killed

Date & Time: Mar 10, 2019 at 0844 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ET-AVJ
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Addis Ababa – Nairobi
MSN:
62450/7243
YOM:
2018
Flight number:
ET302
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
8
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
149
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
157
Captain / Total flying hours:
8122
Captain / Total hours on type:
1417.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
361
Copilot / Total hours on type:
207
Aircraft flight hours:
1330
Aircraft flight cycles:
382
Circumstances:
On March 10, 2019, at 05:38 UTC, Ethiopian Airlines flight 302, Boeing 737-8(MAX), ET-AVJ, took off from Addis Ababa Bole Int. Airport bound to Nairobi, Kenya Jomo Kenyatta Int. Airport. Shortly after takeoff, the Angle of Attack sensor recorded value became erroneous and the left stick shaker activated and remained active until near the end of the flight. In addition, the airspeed and altitude values from the left air data system began deviating from the corresponding right side values. Due to flight control problems, the Captain was unable to maintain the flight path and requested to return back to the departure airport. The crew lost control of the aircraft which crashed at 5: 44 UTC 28 NM South East of Addis Ababa near Ejere village. Both CVR and DFDR were recovered in the morning of March 11. The Boeing 737 MAX was grounded until the end of 2020.

A preliminary report is available below.
Final Report:

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-8-Q402 in Dire Dawa

Date & Time: Oct 24, 2016
Operator:
Registration:
ET-ANY
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Dire Dawa – Addis Ababa
MSN:
4334
YOM:
2010
Flight number:
ET212
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
74
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
During the takeoff roll from runway 15/33 at Dire Dawa-Aba Tenna Dejazmach Yilma Airport, the aircraft collided with wild animals. The captaint abandoned the takeoff procedure and initiated an emergency braking manoeuvre when the aircraft veered off runway and came to rest. All 80 occupants evacuated safely and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
Collision with wild animals during takeoff.

Crash of a Boeing 737-8AS off Beyrouth: 90 killed

Date & Time: Jan 25, 2010 at 0241 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ET-ANB
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Beirut - Addis Ababa
MSN:
29935/1061
YOM:
2002
Flight number:
ET409
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
8
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
82
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
90
Captain / Total flying hours:
10233
Captain / Total hours on type:
188.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
673
Copilot / Total hours on type:
350
Aircraft flight hours:
26459
Aircraft flight cycles:
17823
Circumstances:
On 25 January 2010, at 00:41:30 UTC, Ethiopian Airlines flight ET 409, a Boeing 737-800 registered ET-ANB, crashed into the Mediterranean Sea about 5 NM South West of Beirut Rafic Hariri International Airport (BRHIA), Beirut, Lebanon. ET 409 was being operated under the provisions of the Ethiopian Civil Aviation Regulations (ECAR) and as a scheduled international flight between BRHIA and Addis Ababa Bole International Airport (ADD) - Ethiopia. It departed Beirut with 90 persons on board: 2 flight crew (a Captain and a First Officer), 5 cabin crew, an IFSO and 82 regular passengers. The flight departed at night on an instrument flight plan. Low clouds, isolated cumulonimbus (CB) and thunderstorms were reported in the area. The flight was initially cleared by ATC on a LATEB 1 D departure then the clearance was changed before take-off to an “immediate right turn direct Chekka”. After take-off ATC (Tower) instructed ET 409 to turn right on a heading of 315°. ET 409 acknowledged and heading 315° was selected on the Mode Control Panel (MCP). As the aircraft was on a right turn, Control suggested to ET 409 to follow heading 270° “due to weather”. However, ET 409 continued right turn beyond the selected heading of 315° and Control immediately instructed them to “turn left now heading 270°”. ET 409 acknowledged, the crew selected 270° on the MCP and initiated a left turn. ET 409 continued the left turn beyond the instructed/selected heading of 270° despite several calls from ATC to turn right heading 270° and acknowledgment from the crew. ET 409 reached a southerly track before sharply turning left until it disappeared from the radar screen and crashed into the sea 4‟ 59” after the initiation of the take-off roll (4‟17” in the air). The aircraft impacted the water surface around 5 NM South West of BRHIA and all occupants were fatally injured. Search and Rescue (S&R) operations were immediately initiated. The DFDR and CVR were retrieved from the sea bed and were read, as per the Lebanese Government decision, at the BEA facility at Le Bourget, France. The recorders data revealed that ET 409 encountered during flight two stick shakers for a period of 27” and 26”. They also recorded 11 “Bank Angle” aural warnings at different times during the flight and an over-speed clacker towards the end of the flight. The maximum recorded AOA was 32°, maximum recorded bank angle was 118° left, maximum recorded speed was 407.5 knots, maximum recorded G load was 4.76 and maximum recorded nose down pitch value 63.1°. The DFDR recording stopped at 00:41:28 with the aircraft at 1291‟. The last radar screen recording was at 00:41:28 with the aircraft at 1300‟. The last CVR recording was a loud noise just prior to 00:41:30.
Probable cause:
Probable Causes:
1- The flight crew's mismanagement of the aircraft's speed, altitude, headings and attitude through inconsistent flight control inputs resulting in a loss of control.
2- The flight crew failure to abide by CRM principles of mutual support and calling deviations hindered any timely intervention and correction.
Contributing Factors:
1- The manipulation of the flight controls by the flight crew in an ineffective manner resulted in the aircraft undesired behavior and increased the level of stress of the pilots.
2- The aircraft being out of trim for most of the flight directly increased the workload on the pilot and made his control of the aircraft more demanding.
3- The prevailing weather conditions at night most probably resulted in spatial disorientation to the flight crew and lead to loss of situational awareness.
4- The relative inexperience of the Flight Crew on type combined with their unfamiliarity with the airport contributed, most likely, to increase the Flight Crew workload and stress.
5- The consecutive flying (188 hours in 51 days) on a new type with the absolute minimum rest could have likely resulted in a chronic fatigue affecting the captain's performance.
6- The heavy meal discussed by the crew prior to take-off has affected their quality of sleep prior to that flight.
7- The aircraft 11 bank angle aural warnings, 2 stalls and final spiral dive contributed in the increase of the crew workload and stress level.
8- Symptoms similar to those of a subtle incapacitation have been identified and could have resulted from and/or explain most of the causes mentioned above. However, there is no factual evidence to confirm without any doubt such a cause.
9- The F/O reluctance to intervene did not help in confirming a case of captain's subtle incapacitation and/or to take over control of the aircraft as stipulated in the operator's SOP.
Final Report:

Crash of a Boeing 707-347C in Addis Ababa

Date & Time: Jun 19, 2005 at 0342 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C5-MBM
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Douala - Addis Ababa
MSN:
19966
YOM:
1968
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Following a night approach to Addis Ababa-Bole Airport, the aircraft landed hard and bounced several times. It lost its undercarriage, slid for few dozen metres then veered off runway to the left and came to rest. All five crew members escaped uninjured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Boeing 707-3K1C off Entebbe

Date & Time: Mar 19, 2005 at 1053 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
9G-IRL
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Addis Ababa - Entebbe - Lomé
MSN:
20805
YOM:
1974
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The aircraft was completing a cargo flight from Addis Ababa to Lomé, Togo, with an intermediate stop in Entebbe, Uganda, carrying five crew members and a load of 32,8 tons of various goods (T-shirts) on behalf of Ethiopian Airlines. On approach to runway 17 in a 8 km visibility, the captain decided to initiate a go-around procedure. Few minutes later, while on a second attempt to land on runway 35, the crew encountered local patches of fog when, on short final, the aircraft crashed in Lake Victoria. The tail was found about 200 metres offshore while the cockpit was found near the shore. All five occupants were injured.
Probable cause:
The crew continued the approach below MDA until the aircraft impacted water and crashed. The crew failed to follow the published procedures and to initiate a second go-around procedure.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-6 Twin Otter 300 in Addis Ababa

Date & Time: Oct 22, 1995 at 0950 LT
Operator:
Registration:
ET-AIO
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Kombolcha-Dessie – Addis Ababa
MSN:
818
YOM:
1985
Flight number:
ET173
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
17
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On final approach to Addis Ababa-Bole Airport, the twin engine aircraft collided with a white backed vulture of 5,4 kg. The windshield was broken and both pilots were seriously injured. Nevertheless, they elected to make an emergency landing when the aircraft crashed 300 metres short of runway. All 20 occupants were rescued, among them nine were injured.
Probable cause:
Loss of control on final approach following bird strike.

Crash of a Fokker F27 Friendship 300 near Hareto

Date & Time: Mar 23, 1993 at 1330 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
ST-AWA
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Dar es Salaam - Addis Ababa - Khartoum
MSN:
10186
YOM:
1961
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
29
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
While in cruising altitude between Dar es-Salaam and Addis Ababa, the crew encountered unfavorable winds and the aircraft deviated from the prescribed course. After the left engine failed in flight, the crew reduced his altitude and attempted an emergency landing in a plantation located in the region of Hareto. Upon touchdown, the aircraft struck obstacles and the left wing was partially torn off. All 35 occupants escaped uninjured and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
Failure of the left engine in flight due to fuel exhaustion.

Crash of a Lockheed L-382G-67E Hercules near Djibouti City: 4 killed

Date & Time: Sep 17, 1991
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ET-AJL
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Djibouti City - Addis Ababa
MSN:
5029
YOM:
1985
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
The four engine aircraft was engaged in a special humanitarian flight from Djibouti City to Addis Ababa, carrying four crew members and a load of foodstuffs on behalf of the World Food Programme. After departure from Djibouti City, while climbing, the pilot informed ATC about technical problems with the main landing gear and was cleared to return. The crew initiated a turn when the aircraft struck the slope of Mt Arey located few km from Djibouti. The aircraft was destroyed upon impact and all four occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
It is believed that the crew focused on the main gear problems and failed to adhere to standard approach procedure, causing the aircraft to descend prematurely and to struck the mountain. Lack of crew coordination and lack of visibility were considered as contributing factors.

Crash of a Boeing 707-379C in Addis Ababa

Date & Time: Jul 25, 1990 at 1116 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ET-ACQ
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Addis Ababa - Asmara
MSN:
19820
YOM:
1968
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
During the takeoff roll at Addis Ababa-Bole Airport runway 07, at a speed of about 100 knots, the captain spotted pigeons around the runway and shortly later, the power on engine n°2 and 3 dropped. The crew decided to abort the takeoff maneuver and initiated an emergency braking procedure. Unable to stop within the remaining distance, the aircraft overran, lost its undercarriage, went down an embankment and came to rest, broken in two. All four crew members escaped uninjured while the aircraft was written off.
Probable cause:
It was determined that both engine n°2 and 3 lost power after being hit by a flock of pigeons.