Crash of a Britten-Norman BN-2A-26 Islander off Cocos Islands: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jan 16, 1999 at 1430 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-XFF
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Horn Island - Cocos Islands
MSN:
763
YOM:
1975
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
2540
Captain / Total hours on type:
197.00
Aircraft flight cycles:
16775
Circumstances:
Uzu Air conducted passenger and freight operations between Horn Island and the island communities in the Torres Strait. It operated single-engine Cessna models 206 and 208 aircraft, and twin-engine Britten Norman Islander aircraft. On the morning of the accident, the pilot flew a company Cessna 206 aircraft from Horn Island to Yam, Coconut, and Badu Islands, and then returned to Horn Island. The total flight time was about 93 minutes. The pilot's schedule during the afternoon was to fly from Horn Island to Coconut, Yam, York, and Coconut Islands and then back to Horn Island, departing at 1330 eastern standard time. The flight was to be conducted in Islander, VH-XFF. Three passengers and about 130 kg freight were to be carried on the Horn Island - Coconut Island sector. Another company pilot had completed three flights in XFF earlier in the day for a total of 1.9 hours. He reported that the aircraft operated normally. Witnesses at Horn Island reported that the preparation for the flight, and the subsequent departure of the aircraft at 1350, proceeded normally. The pilot of another company aircraft heard the pilot of XFF report 15 NM SW of Coconut Island at 3,500 ft. A few minutes later, the pilot reported downwind for runway 27 at Coconut Island. Both transmissions sounded normal. Three members of the Coconut Island community reported that, at about 1410, they were on the beach at the eastern extremity of the island, about 250 m from the runway threshold and close to the extended runway centreline. Their recollections of the progress of the aircraft in the Coconut Island circuit are as follows: the aircraft joined the downwind leg and flew a left circuit for runway 27; the aircraft appeared to fly a normal approach until it passed over their position at an altitude of 200-300 ft; and it then veered left and commenced a shallow climb before suddenly rolling right and descending steeply onto a tidal flat, about 30 m seaward from the high-water mark, and about 200 m from their position. A passenger was seriously injured while three other occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
The following findings were identified:
- The pilot initiated a go-around from final approach because of a vehicle on the airstrip.
- The left propeller showed little evidence of rotation damage. The reason for a possible loss of left engine power could not be determined.
- For reasons that could not be established, the pilot lost control of the aircraft at a low height.
Final Report:

Crash of a Lockheed P-3C Orion off Cocos Islands: 1 killed

Date & Time: Apr 26, 1991
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
A9-754
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
185-5662
YOM:
1978
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
17
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The aircraft was engaged in a local flight and was carrying 17 passengers and a crew of four. After takeoff from Cocos Island Airport, the crew climbed to 5,000 feet then reduced his altitude for a low pass over the airport. Approaching the airport at a speed of 380 knots and at a height of about 300 feet, the pilot-in-command increased engine power in a way to gain height when the aircraft lost several pieces from the left wing. Due to severe vibrations and problems of controllability, the crew decided to attempt an emergency landing near the airport. The aircraft struck the ground, lost its undercarriage and came to rest in shallow water. A passenger was killed after being hit by propeller blades that punctured the fuselage. All 20 other occupants escaped uninjured and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
Forced landing following severe vibrations after several elements from the left leading edge detached in flight.

Crash of a Lockheed L-1049G Super Constellation in Port Louis

Date & Time: Aug 24, 1960 at 1747 LT
Operator:
Registration:
VH-EAC
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Port Louis – Cocos Islands – Perth
MSN:
4606
YOM:
1955
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
12
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
38
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Aircraft flight hours:
13842
Circumstances:
During the takeoff roll on runway 13 at Port Louis-Plaisance Airport, at a speed of 115 knots (just before V1 speed), the engine number three suffered a technical failure. The captain decided to abandon the takeoff procedure and started an emergency braking maneuver. Unable to stop within the remaining distance, the four engine airplane overran, lost its undercarriage and came to rest in flames 100 yards farther. All 50 occupants were evacuated safely while the aircraft was completely destroyed by fire. Twenty people, among them four crew members, were injured.
Probable cause:
The exact cause of the failure of the engine number three was not determined as well as the reason why the crew was unable to stop within the remaining distance. At the time of the accident, the runway was wet due to rain falls which may contribute to the event.

Crash of an Avro 691 Lancastrian I into the Indian Ocean: 10 killed

Date & Time: Mar 23, 1946
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-AGLX
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
London – Karachi – Colombo – Cocos Island – Sydney
MSN:
1178
YOM:
1944
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
10
Circumstances:
The aircraft crashed in unknown circumstances into the Indian Ocean while on a leg from Colombo to Cocos Islands. As the aircraft failed to arrive, SAR operations were conducted but eventually suspended 10 days later as no trace of the aircraft nor the crew was ever found. Lost without trace.
Probable cause:
As the aircraft was no recovered, it was not possible to determine the exact cause of the accident.

Crash of a Consolidated PBY-5 Catalina IVB off Cocos Islands: 9 killed

Date & Time: Jun 27, 1945
Operator:
Registration:
JX435
Survivors:
Yes
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
8
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
9
Circumstances:
The pilot attempted to land downwind in a rough sea and the Catalina overshot the alighting area and the aircraft's nose dug in, almost causing it to overturn but fell back in an erect position and then caught fire and sank in fairly shallow waters.
Crew (240th Squadron):
F/Sgt Edward William George Denmark, pilot,
W/O Eric John Freeman, pilot,
F/Sgt Geoffrey Sims, pilot,
P/O Francise Arthur Marshall, navigator,
F/Sgt David James John Paramore, flight engineer,
F/Sgt Edward Benn, wireless operator and air gunner,
F/Sgt Eric George Spearing, air gunner,
Cpl Fred Haworth, air gunner.
Passengers:
Eric Henry John Butler,
Edward Allen,
William Liverton,
James Mitchell,
Robert Short,
Peter Collett.
Source:
http://aircrewremembered.com/raf1945/3/denmarkedward.html
Probable cause:
Some reports state that the aircraft was overloaded with equipment etc but that the main cause was the landing direction.