Country
code

Wiltshire

Crash of a Gippsland GA-8 Airvan in Swindon

Date & Time: Nov 28, 2010 at 1015 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-CDYA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Swindon - Swindon
MSN:
GA8-05-090
YOM:
2006
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2686
Captain / Total hours on type:
1057.00
Circumstances:
The pilot arrived at the aircraft at approximately 0900 hrs to prepare it for a flight to drop parachutists. The aircraft had been outside overnight and there had been a heavy frost. The pilot removed a cover from the windscreen and began his pre-flight check during which he noticed no ice or frost on the upper surface of the wings. He returned to the operations building to complete his pre-flight planning and went back to the aircraft in time to start the engine at 1000 hrs. There was a very light wind from the north-west across the grass Runway 06L, the temperature was -4°C and the QNH was 1004 mb. While the engine was warming up, eight parachutists boarded the aircraft and sat down in the cabin. There were three parachute instructors, who were connected to three students, and two other parachutists with video cameras, one of whom was the jump supervisor. After the pilot judged that the engine had warmed up, he carried out a power check and the before takeoff checks, during which he selected the flaps to TAKEOFF. All indications appeared normal to the pilot and he taxied onto the runway and selected takeoff power, which was 29 inches of Manifold Air Pressure (MAP)and 2,500 rpm. The acceleration seemed, to the pilot, to be normal but, although VR was 60 kt, he delayed the rotation until 65 kt. At about the time the aircraft rotated, the pilot selected the flaps to FULL. As the aircraft crossed the hedge at the upwind end of the runway, the pilot began a left turn, which was the usual noise abatement manoeuvre to avoid flying over buildings situated on the runway’s extended centreline. During the turn, he realised the aircraft was descending and checked the engine instruments, observing that the MAP, fuel pressure and rpm were indicating correctly. He called “BRACE, BRACE, BRACE” and the aircraft hit the ground immediately afterwards in a left wing low attitude. After crossing a ditch, during which the landing gear detached, the aircraft skidded to a halt in the next field. The pilot was able to exit the aircraft through the door on his left but found that he could not stand up because of an injury to his leg. The sliding door on the rear left side of the cabin was jammed and the parachutists were unable to use it to leave the aircraft and so they exited through the same door as the pilot. One parachutist received a whiplash injury but the rest were unhurt. The pilot was subsequently airlifted to hospital.
Probable cause:
The aircraft was parked outside overnight prior to the accident and the windscreen, which had been covered, was clear of ice and frost when the cover was removed. Four hours after the accident, the windscreen was still clear, which suggested that ice and frost were not actively forming during that period. However, since frost was found on the upper surface of the wing, it was concluded that the frost would have been present prior to and during the takeoff. The maximum engine power was found to be approximately 50 bhp less than the rated value. This was attributed to the state of wear expected of an engine approximately 75% through its normal overhaul life rather than as a result of a failure experienced on this particular takeoff. The distance to lift off, calculated using the manufacturer’s performance information, should have been between 340 m and approximately 368 m and yet the aircraft actually left the ground after approximately 560 m. The extra distance used by the aircraft was probably a combination of two factors: the engine was not producing the power assumed in the performance calculation and the aircraft was rotated approximately three to five knots above VR. It is possible that takeoff performance was reduced due to the effects of frost on the wings but it was not possible to quantify these effects. As the aircraft began its left turn, the flaps were at FULL and yet the flap selector handle and the flaps were found in the TAKEOFF position following the accident. At some point in the turn, therefore, the flaps were raised by one stage. This would have had the effect of increasing the stalling speed by approximately three knots (in the case of an uncontaminated wing). The groundspeed of the aircraft, recorded by the GPS approximately six seconds before impact, was 58 kt. The aircraft was turning into a light wind and so the IAS might have been slightly higher. The stalling speed of the aircraft during the turn, with the flaps in the TAKEOFF position and with an uncontaminated wing, would have been approximately 63 kt. The effect of the frost would have been to increase the stalling speed, in the worst case, to 75 kt. The CAA Safety Sense Leaflet 3 suggests that the maximum reduction of lift might occur with frost that has a surface roughness of course sandpaper, whereas the frost found on G-CDYA was similar to medium sandpaper. Nevertheless, it was clear that the lifting ability of the wing would have been compromised and the stalling speed would have been higher than 63 kt. It seemed probable, therefore, that the aircraft stalled in the turn as a result of frost on the wing. Furthermore, the angle of attack at the stall was probably lower than that required to activate the stall warning horn.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 340A in Marshfield

Date & Time: Jun 12, 1993 at 1040 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
G-JMDD
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Ipswich - Marshfield
MSN:
340A-0313
YOM:
1977
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
1194
Captain / Total hours on type:
570.00
Circumstances:
On his second visit to Marshfield Airstrip, the pilot noted that the surface wind was blowing from 300°, across the 880 yard long grass strip which is oriented 08/26. He recalled that the strip had a significant slope which he thought was iphill on runway 08 and he decided to land in that direction to take advantage of the deceleration gained by landing uphill. The pilot made two approached to the strip followed by go-arounds during which he assessed the strength of the crosswind which was stronger than forecast. On the third approach the aircraft cleared trees close to the runway threshold and touched down between one third and one half of the way along the strip. The pilot stated that touchdown in this area was a deliberate decision on his part which was justified by the aircraft's ability to stop quickly on an uphill grass surface. Unfortunately, he had in fact landed in the downhill, downwind direction and was unable to stop the aircraft on the wet grass before the end of the strip. The aircraft passed through a low, dry stone wall at the end of the grass at a speed of 15 knots and came to rest some 10 metres beyond it after all three landing gears had collapsed rearwards. No one was hurt and there was no fire; all the occupants were able to leave the aircraft through the normal exit door. §
Probable cause:
The pilot landed on the wrong runway according to wind component.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 340A in Longleat House

Date & Time: Jun 8, 1991 at 1830 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
G-BKAN
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
340A-1528
YOM:
1982
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2130
Captain / Total hours on type:
321.00
Circumstances:
On arrival at Longleat, the aircraft made a circuit of the landing area, which was a section of private road closed to the public. During this circuit, the pilot commented to his passengers that the road might be too narrow for the aircraft, which had a mainwheel track width of 3,93 meters. The road is 5,4 meters wide and, on this occasion, was bounded on both sides with wet grass. The wind was southerly and the landing direction was 155° (M). Landing Distance Available was 973 meters. On short final approach to land after a second circuit of the intended landing place, the aircraft encountered windshear at 200 feet agl, and touched down on the grass 1,6 metre to the left of the landing strip, striking the left propeller and the tail skid on the ground. The aircraft then struck a 'No Parking' sign and, 48 metres further on, as the landing gear started to sink into the soft ground, the right propeller also contacted the ground. The aircraft came to rest in another 64 metres. There was no fire, but one of the passenger seat back collapsed at some stage of the landing or the roll-out, resulting in a minor back injury to one of the passengers. He was taken to the local hospital but was released the same evening.
Final Report:

Crash of a Britten-Norman BN-2A-9 Islander in Netheravon AFB

Date & Time: Feb 20, 1982 at 1255 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-BBRP
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Netheravon - Netheravon
MSN:
371
YOM:
1973
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3422
Captain / Total hours on type:
235.00
Aircraft flight hours:
5466
Circumstances:
The accident occurred whilst the aircraft was taking off on a parachute dropping flight with the pilot and eight parachutists on board. Shortly after takeoff, at a height of about 50 feet above ground level, the pilot detected a loss of power from the port engine. He then selected the flaps up, but whilst he was about to commence the shut down and propeller feathering drills for the port engine, the starboard engine also appeared to lose power. In the subsequent attempt to land the aircraft straight ahead, the pilot was unable to reduce a high sink rate and a heavy landing resulted. The aircraft sustained severe damage that was beyond economic repair, but there were no injuries to those on board.
Probable cause:
The accident was caused by the fact that the pilot was unable to reduce the aircraft's rate of descent sufficiently to prevent a heavy landing. Contributory factors were the loss of all power from the port engine due to fuel mismanagement and the pilot's decision initially to attempt to continue the take-off.
Final Report:

Crash of an Armstrong Whitworth AW.660 Argosy C.1 at RAF Boscombe Down: 2 killed

Date & Time: Apr 27, 1976
Operator:
Registration:
XR105
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Boscombe Down - Boscombe Down
MSN:
6783
YOM:
1962
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The crew was completing a local training mission at RAF Boscombe Down. On final approach with one engine voluntarily inoperative, the airplane banked left and right, causing a wing to drop and to struck a building. Out of control, the airplane lost height and crashed. A crew member was injured while two other occupants were killed, among them an officer from the Italian Army.

Crash of a Lockheed C-130K Hercules at RAF Colerne: 5 killed

Date & Time: Sep 10, 1973
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
XV198
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Colerne - Colerne
MSN:
4219
YOM:
1967
Region:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
The crew was engaged in a local training flight at RAF Colerne and was completing touch-and-go manoeuvres. While in initial climb with the engine n°1 voluntarily off, the engine n°2 failed. The airplane rolled to the left and crashed in flames in a wooded area located few hundred yards past the runway end. The aircraft was destroyed and all five crew members were killed.
Crew:
S/L Anthony Barratt,
F/Lt Douglas Mills,
F/Lt Stuart Fraser,
Sgt Peter Coate,
L/M Walter Natt.
Probable cause:
Failure of the engine n°2 for unknown reasons while the engine n°1 was off for training puposes.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver AL1 in Broad Chalke

Date & Time: Dec 21, 1966
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
XP770
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
1440
YOM:
1960
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Shortly after take off from a field in Broad Chalke, southeast of Salisbury, Wiltshire, the aircraft failed to gain sufficient altitude. The Beaver hit tree tops and crashed in a wooded area. While the pilot was slightly injured, the aircraft was destroyed.
Probable cause:
It appears that flaps had been set in the cruise position instead of the take off position.

Crash of a BAc 111-200AB in Chicklade: 7 killed

Date & Time: Oct 22, 1963 at 1040 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-ASHG
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Wisley - Wisley
MSN:
001
YOM:
1963
Region:
Crew on board:
7
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Captain / Total flying hours:
5385
Captain / Total hours on type:
78.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
9648
Aircraft flight hours:
81
Aircraft flight cycles:
52
Circumstances:
The aircraft took off at 1017 hours GMT from runway 10, at Wisley Aerodrome on its fifty third test flight. It was to carry out stalling tests in all configurations with the centre of gravity at 0.38 SMC (standard mean chord), the furthest aft limit for which the aircraft had then been cleared. Based on the radio-telephony conversations recorded in the Wisley Tower and the flight recorders carried aboard the aircraft, the flight was reconstructed. Following take-off the aircraft climbed in visual meteorological conditions on a westerly heading to 17 000 ft while monitored by Wisley radar. At 1026 the co-pilot reported that they were about to commence tests at flight level 170. By 1035, four stalls had been completed with the undercarriage and flaps up. The co-pilot acknowledged a fix from Wisley at 1036 hours and nothing further was heard from the aircraft. The flaps were then lowered to to investigate the stalling characteristics in this configuration. The stall was initiated about two minutes after the last contact, when the aircraft was between 15 000 and 16 000 ft. Approach to the stall appears to have been normal. When attempting recovery, the elevators responded initially to the control movement but subsequently floated to the fully up position in spite of a large push force on the control column. The aircraft then descended in a substantially horizontal fore and aft attitude at about 180 ft/sec (54 meters per sec). During the descent it banked twice to the right and once to the left and at one stage the engines were opened up to full power. This action resulted in a large nose-up pitch which was followed by a pitch down when power was taken off. The aircraft then assumed the substantially horizontal attitude in which it made impact with the ground. The final portion of the flight was observed by numerous eye witnesses who commented on the low level of engine noise and a sharp report from the aircraft which was heard while it was in the air. The aircraft had approached from the southwest, in a stable stalled condition, and crashed at about 1040 hours in a flat attitude. Following impact, the aircraft moved forward about 70 ft and some 15 ft to the right before coming to rest. It exploded and caught fire. All seven crew members, four engineers and three test pilots, were killed.
Probable cause:
The nose-down pitching moment (elevator neutral) just beyond the stall was insufficient to rotate the aeroplane at the rate required to counteract the increase of incidence due to the g-break. During the fifth stall the angle of incidence reached a value at which the elevator effectiveness was insufficient to effect recovery. During a stalling test the aircraft entered a stable stalled condition recovery from which was impossible.
Final Report:

Crash of a Vickers 607 Valetta T.3 near Chippenham: 3 killed

Date & Time: Aug 28, 1962
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
WJ480
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Lyneham - Lyneham
MSN:
605
YOM:
11
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
The crew was performing a local training flight at RAF Lyneham, consisting of takeoff and landings with one engine inoperative. Following a low pass over RAF Lyneham, the crew continued to the northwest when control was lost. The airplane dove into the ground and crashed in a field located five miles northwest of Chippenham. Two crew members were killed while the third occupant was seriously injured. He died from his injuries eight days later.
Probable cause:
The crew voluntarily shut down the right engine to simulate a failure and switched off the fuel system. While climbing, the crew elected to restart the right engine but forgot to switch the fuel system on. Due to insufficient speed, the airplane lost height, stalled and eventually crashed.

Crash of a Scottish Twin Pioneer CC.1 at RAF Upavon

Date & Time: Apr 29, 1960
Operator:
Registration:
XL555
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Upavon - Upavon
MSN:
131
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff, while in initial climb, the airplane stalled and crashed. Both pilots were unhurt while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.