Country

Crash of an ATR42-300 in Fond-du-Lac: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 13, 2017 at 1815 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GWEA
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Fond-du-Lac - Stony Rapids
MSN:
240
YOM:
1991
Flight number:
WEW280
Country:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
22
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Shortly after a night takeoff from Fond-du-Lac Airport, en route to Stony Rapids, the airplane crashed in unknown circumstances in a wooded area located one km from the airfield. The aircraft was destroyed and among the 25 people on board, several were evacuated to local hospital with serious injuries. 13 days later, on December 26, a passenger died from his injuries.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver near Buss Lakes: 5 killed

Date & Time: Jun 30, 2011 at 1111 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
C-GUJX
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Buss Lakes - Southend
MSN:
1132
YOM:
1958
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
4023
Captain / Total hours on type:
3664.00
Aircraft flight hours:
12746
Circumstances:
The Lawrence Bay Airways Ltd. float-equipped de Havilland DHC-2 (registration C-GUJX, serial number 1132) departed from a lake adjacent to a remote fishing cabin near Buss Lakes for a day visual flight rules flight to Southend, Saskatchewan, about 37 nautical miles (nm) southeast. There were 4 passengers and 1 pilot onboard. The aircraft crashed along the shoreline of another lake located about 2 nm southeast of its point of departure. The impact was severe and the 5 occupants were killed on impact. The emergency locator transmitter activated, and the aircraft was found partially submerged in shallow water with the right wing tip resting on the shore. There was no post-crash fire. The accident occurred during daylight hours at about 1111 Central Standard Time.
Probable cause:
Findings as to Causes and Contributing Factors:
While manoeuvring at low level, the aircraft's critical angle of attack was likely exceeded and the aircraft stalled. The stall occurred at an altitude from which recovery was not possible.
Other Findings:
The separation of the propeller blade tip likely resulted from impact forces.
The investigation could not determine whether the fuel pressure warning light was illuminated prior to the accident.
Final Report:

Crash of a Casa 212 Aviocar in Saskatoon: 1 killed

Date & Time: Apr 1, 2011 at 1830 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FDKM
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Saskatoon - Saskatoon
MSN:
196
YOM:
1981
Country:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
7400
Captain / Total hours on type:
75.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
7800
Copilot / Total hours on type:
1800
Aircraft flight hours:
21292
Circumstances:
At 1503 Central Standard Time, the Construcciones Aeronauticas SA (CASA) C-212-CC40 (registration C-FDKM, serial number 196) operated by Fugro Aviation Canada Ltd., departed from Saskatoon/Diefenbaker International Airport, Saskatchewan, under visual flight rules for a geophysical survey flight to the east of Saskatoon. On board were 2 pilots and a survey equipment operator. At about 1814, the right engine lost power. The crew shut it down, carried out checklist procedures, and commenced an approach for Runway 27. When the flight was 3.5 nautical miles from the runway on final approach, the left engine lost power. The crew carried out a forced landing adjacent to Wanuskewin Road in Saskatoon. The aircraft impacted a concrete roadway noise abatement wall and was destroyed. The survey equipment operator sustained fatal injuries, the first officer sustained serious injuries, and the captain sustained minor injuries. No ELT signal was received.
Probable cause:
Conclusions
Findings as to Causes and Contributing Factors:
1. The right engine lost power when the intermediate spur gear on the torque sensor shaft failed. This resulted in loss of drive to the high-pressure engine-driven pump, fuel starvation, and immediate engine stoppage.
2. The ability of the left-hand No. 2 ejector pump to deliver fuel to the collector tank was compromised by foreign object debris (FOD) in the ejector pump nozzle.
3. When the fuel level in the left collector tank decreased, the left fuel level warning light likely illuminated but was not noticed by the crew.
4. The pilots did not execute the fuel level warning checklist because they did not perceive the illumination of the fuel level left tank warning light. Consequently, the fuel crossfeed valve remained closed and fuel from only the left wing was being supplied to the left engine.
5. The left engine flamed out as a result of depletion of the collector tank and fuel starvation, and the crew had to make a forced landing resulting in an impact with a concrete noise abatement wall.
Findings as to Risk:
1. Depending on the combination of fuel level and bank angle in single-engine uncoordinated flight, the ejector pump system may not have the delivery capacity, when the No. 1 ejector inlet is exposed, to prevent eventual depletion of the collector tank when the engine is operated at full power. Depletion of the collector tank will result in engine power loss.
2. The master caution annunciator does not flash; this leads to a risk that the the crew may not notice the illumination of an annunciator panel segment, in turn increasing the risk of them not taking action to correct the condition which activated the master caution.
3. When cockpit voice and flight data recordings are not available to an investigation, this may preclude the identification and communication of safety deficiencies to advance transportation safety.
4. Because the inlets of the ejector pumps are unscreened, there is a risk that FOD in the fuel tank may become lodged in an ejector nozzle and result in a decrease in the fuel delivery rate to the collector tank.
Other Findings:
1. The crew’s decision not to recover or jettison the birds immediately resulted in operation for an extended period with minimal climb performance.
2. The composition and origin of the FOD, as well as how or when it had been introduced into the fuel tank, could not be determined.
3. The SkyTrac system provided timely position information that would have assisted search and rescue personnel if position data had been required.
4. Saskatoon police, firefighters, and paramedics responded rapidly to the accident and provided effective assistance to the survivors.
Final Report:

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-6 Twin Otter in La Ronge

Date & Time: Feb 4, 2009 at 0915 LT
Operator:
Registration:
C-FCCE
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
La Ronge-Deschambeault Lake
MSN:
008
YOM:
1966
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
14000
Captain / Total hours on type:
11000.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
625
Copilot / Total hours on type:
425
Circumstances:
The aircraft was taking off from a ski strip east of and parallel to Runway 36 at La Ronge. After the nose ski cleared the snow, the left wing rose and the aircraft veered to the right and the captain, who was the pilot flying, continued the take-off. The right ski, however, was still in contact with the snow. The aircraft became airborne briefly as it cleared a deep gully to the right of the runway. The aircraft remained in a steep right bank and the right wing contacted the snow-covered ground. The aircraft flew through a chain link fence and crashed into trees surrounding the airport. The five passengers and two crewmembers evacuated the aircraft with minor injuries. There was a small fire near the right engine exhaust that was immediately extinguished by the crew.
Probable cause:
Contamination on the wings of the aircraft was not fully removed before take-off. It is likely that asymmetric contamination of the wings created a lift differential and a loss of lateral control.
Although the operator was not authorized for short take-off and landing (STOL) take-off on this aircraft, the crew conducted a STOL take-off, which reduced the aircraft's safety margin relative to its stalling speed and minimum control speed.
As a result of the loss of lateral control, the slow STOL take-off speed, and the manipulation of the flaps, the aircraft did not remain airborne and veered right, colliding with obstacles beside the ski strip.
The out of phase task requirements regarding the engine vibration isolator assembly, as listed in the operator's maintenance schedule approval, results in a less than thorough inspection requirement, increasing the likelihood of fatigue cracks remaining undetected.
The right engine inboard and top engine mounts had pre-existing fatigue cracks, increasing the risk of catastrophic failure.
The cockpit voice recorder (CVR) contained audio of a previous flight and was not in operation during the occurrence flight. Minimum equipment list (MEL) procedures for logbook entries and placarding were not followed.
The Transwest Air Limited safety management system (SMS) did not identify deviations from standard operating procedures.

Crash of a Beechcraft King Air A100 in Stony Rapids

Date & Time: Nov 11, 2008 at 1817 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
C-GWWQ
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Uranium City - Stony Rapids
MSN:
B-76
YOM:
1971
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
For unknown reasons, aircraft made a gear up landing and skidded on runway at Stony Rapids Airport before coming to rest. Both pilots were uninjured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
Gear up landing for undetermined reason.

Crash of a Beechcraft King Air 100 in Sandy Bay: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jan 7, 2007 at 2002 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GFFN
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
La Ronge-Sandy Bay
MSN:
B-190
YOM:
1974
Flight number:
TW350
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
8814
Captain / Total hours on type:
449.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
672
Copilot / Total hours on type:
439
Aircraft flight hours:
17066
Circumstances:
Transwest Air flight 9T350 was a medevac mission from La Ronge, SK, to Sandy Bay. The flight was cleared out of controlled airspace for a descent and an approach at Sandy Bay, but did not arrive at the airport. Search & Rescue located the aircraft one mile from the airport. The captain was killed.

Crash of a Convair CV-580 in La Ronge: 1 killed

Date & Time: May 14, 2006 at 1245 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
C-GSKJ
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
La Ronge-La Ronge
MSN:
202
YOM:
1954
Country:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
9500
Captain / Total hours on type:
750.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
13000
Copilot / Total hours on type:
25
Circumstances:

The Saskatchewan Government Northern Air Operations Convair 340/580, C-GSKJ, operating as TKR 472, was conducting circuits at La Ronge, SK. On climbout after a touch-and-go on runway 36, the aircraft turned to the left, lost altitude and crashed in a wooded area one NM northwest of the airport. One crewmember was killed and two others sustained serious injuries.

Crash of a Swearingen SA227AC Metro III in La Ronge

Date & Time: Sep 21, 2004 at 1410 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FIPW
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Stony Rapids-La Ronge
MSN:
AC-524
YOM:
1982
Flight number:
KA1501
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
9
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:

On landing, the left maiun undercarriage collapsed and the commuter veered off the runway on its left before coming to rest. The aircraft was written off but nobody was injured. TSB said that the accident was caused by maintenance error.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver in Saskatchewan: 1 killed

Date & Time: Aug 2, 2003 at 1700 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GUXW
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Pelican Narrows-Sully Lake
MSN:
0611
YOM:
1954
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
While approaching Sully Lake, the engine stopped and aircraft ditched in the lake. The pilot and one passengers swum to the shore while one passenger died. A cylinder broke during flight.

Crash of a Beechcraft 99 in Prince Albert

Date & Time: Apr 23, 2003 at 1802 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FDYF
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Saskatoon-Prince Albert
MSN:
U-110
YOM:
1969
Flight number:
9T602
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:

On approach, while flying at 1,200 feet, the pilot lost control of aircraft which suddenly pitch down. Few seconds later, the captain recovered control and made an emergency landing 11 km off the airport. No injuries among occupants but the aircraft was destroyed.