Country
code

Kent

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver in Headcorn: 1 killed

Date & Time: Mar 11, 2007 at 1600 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
OY-JRR
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Headcorn-Headcorn
MSN:
1632
YOM:
1966
Location:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The single engine aircraft was performing a training flight with 8 jumpers on board. While taking off from Headcorn aerodrome, near London, the aircraft stalled and crashed. All occupants were injured while the pilot died one hour later. The aircraft was destroyed.

Crash of a Piper PA-31-310 Navajo in Lydd

Date & Time: Jul 17, 1991 at 0930 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-LYDD
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Lydd - Blackpool
MSN:
31-537
YOM:
1969
Location:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3035
Captain / Total hours on type:
1.00
Circumstances:
The aircraft, which had not flown for over 2 years, had been worked-on during the past days and had to be ferried to Blackpool with two pilots on board. During the takeoff roll on runway 22, at a speed of about 60 knots, a loud report was heard and the outboard section of the right wing disintegrated. The crew abandoned the takeoff procedure and was able to stop the aircraft on the runway. They exited the cabin and were uninjured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
The exact cause of the double explosion in the right wing could not be determined with certainty. A possibility was that the non-wetted areas of the tanks had become slightly porous during the time that the aircraft had not been in use and consequently may have allowed small leakages of fuel through the porous areas when the tanks had been filled to capacity. The resultant vapour could then have migrated outboard around the edges of the ribs at the end of the tank bay.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-31-310 Navajo in Rochester: 3 killed

Date & Time: Nov 20, 1985 at 1848 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-BHIZ
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Paris – Southend – Rochester
MSN:
31-672
YOM:
1970
Location:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
5525
Captain / Total hours on type:
3000.00
Circumstances:
The aircraft was returning to Rochester after an overnight business trip to Paris. It landed at Southend Airport at 1815 hours where HM customs clearance was obtained. The aircraft left Southend at 1831 hours for the 14 mile flight to Rochester. It was dark with snow, frost and fog warnings in force. The stratus cloud base at Rochester was estimated to be 600 feet and visibility was estimated to be 2,000 meters in rain and snow. Having established RTF communications with Rochester AFIS the aircraft was seen in the downwind position for runway 03 left hand at a height of 3-400 feet. This visual contact was confirmed at the pilot's request. The aircraft was next seen overhead the airfield at a similar height. When the pilot again reported 'downwind' he said that if he was not happy with his approach he might attempt an approach to the reciprocal runway 21. Eye witnesses in the village of Burham, which lies 1.5 nautical miles southwest of the airfield, saw the aircraft making a left handed approach over the River Medway valley at low level. It then headed over the centre of Burham towards the airfield and shortly afterwards crashed into the steep upper slopes of Blue Bell Hill some 45 feet below the ridge summit of 510 feet. The elevation of Rochester aerodrome is 436 feet. A severe fire followed the impact and the three occupants were killed.
Final Report:

Crash of a Partenavia P.68B near Lydd: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jan 22, 1979
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
G-BEUT
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Dublin - Lydd
MSN:
97
YOM:
1977
Location:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
While approaching Lydd Airport in poor weather conditions, the pilot lost control of the airplane that crashed six miles southwest of the airfield. The aircraft was destroyed and all three occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Loss of control while conducting a non precision approach in a snowstorm.

Crash of a Douglas C-47B-20-DK in Lydd

Date & Time: Aug 17, 1978
Operator:
Registration:
G-AMSM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
15764/27209
YOM:
1945
Location:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
During the takeoff run, the airplane deviated to the left side of the runway. The copilot overcorrected, causing the aircraft to swing right, leaving the runway at an angle of 20° partially airborne. The left wing then scraped the intersecting runway 14 while maneuvering to avoid a windsock mast ahead. The aircraft touched down and skidded to a stop. An oil fire broke out in the right engine. All three occupants escaped uninjured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Rockwell Grand Commander 680 in Rochester

Date & Time: Feb 19, 1975 at 0932 LT
Operator:
Registration:
G-ASHI
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Rochester - Woodford
MSN:
680-658-255
YOM:
1958
Location:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
8237
Captain / Total hours on type:
509.00
Aircraft flight hours:
3615
Circumstances:
After takeoff from runway 03 at Rochester City Airport, while climbing to a height of 900 feet, the left engine gradually lost power. The pilot increased power on the right engine and feathered the left propeller. After passing over the M2 highway at a speed of 100 knots, he expected to return to the airfield when the right engine lost power as well. He attempted an emergency landing by the motorway and the airplane crash landed at a speed of 85 knots before coming to rest. All four occupants were injured and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
The accident was caused by kerosene being placed in a petrol supply at Rochester City Airport. The aircraft, which had been refuelled with the mixed product from the supply, suffered a loss of engine power after takeoff. Thus led to a forced landing in difficult circumstances on unsuitable terrain. The loss of engine power resulted from damage to the engines due to their being run on contaminated fuel.
Final Report:

Crash of an Airspeed AS.57 Ambassador 2 in Manston

Date & Time: Sep 30, 1968
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-AMAG
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
London - London
MSN:
5229
YOM:
1953
Location:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
After a touch-and-go landing at Gatwick Airport, the right main gear didn't lock up. The gear was recycled and the pilot then checked the gear visually and the gear appeared to be fully retracted. On gear extension for the next landing, the right main gear warning light remained on. The gear was recycled several times, but without success. Other attempts (high g turns, using the hand pump, and touching the runway) also failed. It was then decided to make a wheels-up landing on a foam carpet at Manston.
Probable cause:
The starboard undercarriage pin had fractured and fallen out of its housing. This permitted the assembly to drop under its own weight and, as a result it was mechanically impossible for the up-lock catch to disengage from the pin on the undercarriage leg.

Crash of a Bristol 175 Britannia 308F in Manston

Date & Time: Apr 20, 1967
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-ANCG
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
London - Kuwait City
MSN:
12923
YOM:
1959
Location:
Region:
Crew on board:
11
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
54
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
7254
Captain / Total hours on type:
1874.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
7000
Copilot / Total hours on type:
3840
Aircraft flight hours:
10682
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from London-Heathrow Airport, while climbing, the undercarriage wouldn't lock up after takeoff, so the crew recycled the gear a couple of times. On the third attempt, the bogie (which was not rotating in the right sequence) fouled the main hydraulic jack fracturing the attachment bolt of the shuttle valve for the main and emergency 'down' hydraulic lines. All hydraulic fluid escaped and the gear couldn't be extended anymore. In agreement with ATC, the captain decided to divert to Manston-Kent Airport where an emergency landing was carried out on a foamed runway. The airplane completed a belly landing and was damaged beyond repair while all 65 occupants escaped uninjured.
Probable cause:
The undercarriage failed to lock down due to loss of the hydraulic fluid from the main and emergency systems. This resulted from fracture of the hydraulic lines consequent upon fouling of the port undercarriage retraction jack head by the bogie through incorrect setting up of the retraction sequence valve. The following findings were reported:
- The port main undercarriage retraction sequence valve, which was replaced before the flight, was not correctly set up,
- The undercarriage retraction test to check the operation of the sequence valve was carried out in such a way that the incorrect sequence of retraction resulting from the finding indicated in the previous paragraph was not detected,
- When the undercarriage was retracted after takeoff, the port bogie beam fouled the port main undercarriage retraction jack head,
- 'Recycling' the undercarriage resulted in the detachment of the main and emergency 'down' lines, and the loss of all hydraulic fluid and other fluids with which the system was replenished,
- None of the undercarriage units could be locked down and all collapsed during the landing.
Final Report:

Crash of a Vickers 610 Viking 1B in Manston

Date & Time: Aug 2, 1965
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-AHPL
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Manston - Manston
MSN:
149
YOM:
1947
Location:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew was involved in a local training flight at Manston-Kent Airport. During the takeoff roll, the captain decided to abandon the takeoff procedure for unknown reason. Unable to stop within the remaining distance, the twin engine aircraft overran, lost its undercarriage and came to rest on its belly. All three crew members were rescued while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair. The reason why the captain decided to interrupt the takeoff roll remains unknown.

Crash of an Avro 748-1-101 in Lympne

Date & Time: Jul 11, 1965 at 1633 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-ARMV
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Beauvais – Lympne
MSN:
1536
YOM:
1961
Location:
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
48
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
6799
Captain / Total hours on type:
1096.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
980
Copilot / Total hours on type:
192
Aircraft flight hours:
3432
Circumstances:
The aircraft was on a scheduled flight from Beauvais, France to Lympne, England. Before taking off the pilot-in-command obtained a weather report from Lympne as follows: Cloud ceiling : 250 ft . Visibility : 2000 m . Surface wind : 220 degrees at 18 kts. It departed Beauvais at 15:51 hours UTC on an IFR flight plan. As the aircraft passed Abbeville, radio contact was established with Lympne and a weather report was obtained which gave a visibility of 1000 m in drizzle, cloud ceiling of 250 ft and surface wind 220/18 kts gusting to 26 kts. The airline's limits for landing on runway 20 were 1100 m RVR and a cloud ceiling of 200 ft. The pilot-in-command again checked landing conditions at Lympne before commencing an instrument approach and, although conditions had not altered significantly since the previous report, he was informed of a "slight improvement" but the wind was still gusting. The final instrument approach to runway 20 using radar began at 4 miles from touchdown; the aircraft was in cloud, flying at 1100 ft, in turbulent conditions. Three and a half miles from touchdown the pilot-in-command began to descend at 350 to 400 ft/min, the equivalent of a 3° glide path in the prevailing conditions. As there was no radar glide path the Lympne radar controller advised the pilots of the height at which the aircraft should have been at each mile before touchdown. When the aircraft was about 5/8 of a mile from touchdown the radar controller gave a final heading correction and at half a mile, when the talkdown finished, he told the pilots that the aircraft was lined up with the right-hand edge of the runway. The rest of the approach was made visually but the radar controller continued to track the aircraft. He observed it deviate further to the right of the extended centre line as it neared the touchdown point. The pilot-in-command stated that he could see the ground from 250 ft, and at 220ft when half a mile from touchdown he could see the far boundary of the aerodrome through heavy drizzle. Height was maintained at 220 ft for 3 or 4 seconds, then the descent was resumed and at a quarter of a mile from touchdown and at 150 to 200 ft, full flap was selected and power reduced to 10600 rpm. At this stage turbulence became severe. The pilot-in-command realized that the aircraft was going to the right of the runway but he decided not to try to regain the centre line as this would require a turn at low altitude. As the aircraft approached the aerodrome boundary the airspeed indicator was fluctuating and an attempt was made to maintain 92 kts the starboard wing was held down slightly to compensate for port drift. The pilot-in-command stated that he began the flare-out 30 to 40 ft above the ground at an IAS of 88 kt but as he closed the throttles the starboard wing went down suddenly. Although he was aware that the aircraft was descending rapidly, he was initially more concerned about restoring lateral level ; only at the last moment did he attempt to check the rate of descent with elevator control but the aircraft struck the ground heavily on its starboard undercarriage. After the impact, the starboard wing, engine nacelle and undercarriage became separated from the main structure, the aircraft rolled over to starboard and slid along the grass inverted, coming to rest after having swung through approximately 180°.
Probable cause:
A heavy landing following an incomplete flare from a steeper than normal approach.
Final Report: