Country
code

Antrim

Crash of an Armstrong Whitworth AW.650 Argosy 102 in Belfast

Date & Time: Apr 17, 1982
Operator:
Registration:
G-APRN
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
6654
YOM:
1959
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Upon landing at Belfast-Aldergrove Airport, the right main gear collapsed. The airplane came to rest on the runway and was damaged beyond repair. Both pilots escaped uninjured.
Probable cause:
Loss of a pivot pin from the anti-torque link assembly.

Crash of a Handley Page H.P.67 Hastings C.1 in Belfast

Date & Time: Dec 27, 1961
Operator:
Registration:
TG624
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Belfast - Belfast
MSN:
102
YOM:
1950
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
During the takeoff roll, the four engine airplane started to skid on runway. The pilot-in-command pull the control column and completed the rotation. The airplane lifted off and climbed a bit then sank and crashed onto the runway. Out of control, it veered off runway and came to rest. All four crew members were uninjured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
The exact cause of the accident remains unclear.

Crash of an Avro 694 Lincoln B.2 in Belfast

Date & Time: Mar 22, 1961
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
WD144
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Belfast - Belfast
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew was completing a local training mission at Belfast-Aldergrove Airport. After several circuits, the crew started a new approach with an engine voluntarily inoperative. On final, height was lost and the airplane clip trees and crashed in a field located five miles short of runway. All four crew members were injured and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair. This was the last accident involving a RAF Avro Lincoln as this aircraft would be definitively retired from service after this accident.

Crash of a Vickers 802 Viscount in Belfast: 7 killed

Date & Time: Oct 23, 1957 at 1651 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-AOJA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
London - Belfast
MSN:
150
YOM:
1956
Region:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Captain / Total flying hours:
7496
Captain / Total hours on type:
316.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
7439
Copilot / Total hours on type:
259
Circumstances:
The aircraft departed London Airport at 1516LT hours GMT on a flight to Belfast in pursuance of a special charter, carrying 5 crew and 2 company employees. At 1645 the aircraft was taken over by the Precision Approach Controller for a GCA talkdown on runway 28 (276°) in weather conditions which the captain thought would allow him to become visual at or above his critical height of 500 ft. Soon after '3/4 of a mile from touchdown' the aircraft was to the right of the centerline and shortly afterwards was 'well right of centerline', Just after '1/2 a mile from touchdown' the Precision Approach Controller said 'if you're overshooting turn left left 5° on overshoot over' to which the reply came '...overshooting'. At about this time a number of witnesses heard the aircraft "rev-up". Shortly thereafter (at 1651 hours) the aircraft crashed within the boundary of the airport approximately 1,000 ft to the south of the western end of runway 28, killing all occupants.
Probable cause:
A detailed examination of the autopilot equipment salvaged from the aircraft was carried out. There was nothing wrong with the auto pilot and it was not energized nor were the clutches engaged at the time of impact. Careful work was done in the course of a study by an expert to try to establish the flight path followed during the final dive and particular attention was paid to the possibility of a bunt manoeuvre or of a partial recovery from a stall. It appears possible to obtain conditions at impact similar to those reported without requiring any structural failure or unserviceability of the aircraft but also that the manoeuvre required would be of a fairly violent nature. Something may have deceived the pilot into some violent manoeuvre of the kind envisaged. It would seem that the only possible source of such deception would be the Flight System and associated instruments. All that was recovered from the wreckage was subjected to an exhaustive examination by an impressive body of experts and they failed to find anything which pointed to the malfunctioning of any instrument or indicator which could have led the pilot into a disastrous operation of the controls. Thus, the cause of the accident was not determined.
Final Report:

Crash of an Avro 652 Anson C.19 in Belfast

Date & Time: Sep 17, 1956
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VS589
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Belfast - Belfast
Location:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The pilot was performing a local training sortie at Belfast City Airport and was completing a single engine approach when he was forced to attempt an emergency landing for unknown reason. The aircraft crash landed in a field located south of Castlereagh and was damaged beyond repair. The pilot J. Fothergill, a civilian working for Short Brothers and Harland, was uninjured.

Crash of a De Havilland DH.89 Dragon Rapide in the Glendun Mountains: 1 killed

Date & Time: Sep 15, 1953
Operator:
Registration:
NF861
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Stretton – Eglinton
MSN:
6732
YOM:
1944
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
In flight, the twin engine aircraft hit the slope of a mountain located in the Glendun Mountain Range, Antrim. While the pilot Lt A. G. Cronin was injured, the radio operator H. Charlesworth was killed.

Crash of an Avro 696 Shackleton MR.2 in Belfast

Date & Time: May 14, 1953
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
WL749
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
YOM:
1953
Region:
Crew on board:
0
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On final approach to Belfast-Aldergrove Airport, the airplane was too low and hit the ground short of runway threshold. On impact, the left main gear was sheared off and the aircraft slid for dozen yards before coming to rest against the runway controller's caravan. There were no casualties but the aircraft that was recently delivered was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Vickers 610 Viking 1B in Belfast: 27 killed

Date & Time: Jan 5, 1953 at 2139 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-AJDL
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Northolt – Belfast
MSN:
262
YOM:
1949
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
31
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
27
Captain / Total flying hours:
5100
Circumstances:
The crew started the approach to Belfast-Nutt's Corner by night and in marginal weather conditions. On final, the aircraft christened 'Lord Saint Vincent' was too low and hit the approach light number six (the top of which is 113 feet below the glide path) and appeared to level out. It touched down some 250 feet further on, ran along the ground for about 82 feet, rose again, struck the SBA van, came down again and struck the ILS building before breaking up about 200 yards short of runway 28 threshold. Eight occupants were injured while 27 others were killed, among them three crew members. The aircraft was destroyed.
Probable cause:
The Inquiry found no indication of mechanical failure. The documentation of the aircraft was in order, the crew were properly qualified, and control procedures were correctly carried out. The Inquiry found that on the evidence available there existed such conditions as could properly be described as deceptive to the pilot and the conclusion was that the primary cause of the accident was an error of judgment on the part of the Captain.
Final Report:

Crash of an Avro 691 Lancastrian 3 in Belfast

Date & Time: Oct 3, 1947
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-AHBU
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
1289
YOM:
1946
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The takeoff was attempted in poor weather conditions. During takeoff roll started in visual reference, the visibility was insufficient and the captain decided to swap to instrument references. Control was lost and the airplane skidded and then swerved before coming to rest in the Cromlin river. All three crew members were injured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.