Crash of a Cessna 401 in Plymouth

Date & Time: Jun 19, 2010 at 1703 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N401TE
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Plymouth - Plymouth
MSN:
401-0180
YOM:
1971
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3500
Captain / Total hours on type:
1200.00
Aircraft flight hours:
2004
Circumstances:
The airplane was returning from a 3-hour aerial mapping mission and was lined up for a straight-in, 5-mile final approach for landing. About 3 miles out on final approach, and prior to performing the before-landing check, both engines stopped producing power in sequence, one almost immediately after the other. The pilot said that by the time he completed his remedial actions the airplane had descended to about 200 feet above the ground and the engines would not restart. The auxiliary fuel tank gauges were bouncing between 2-5 gallons and the main tanks were bouncing around at 25 gallons per side. The pilot then selected a forced landing site between two large trees and landed the airplane in heavily wooded terrain. A detailed examination of the wreckage revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical anomalies. According to information contained in the aircraft manufacturer’s owner's manual, the auxiliary fuel tanks are designed for cruising flight and are not equipped with pumps; operation near the ground (below 1000 feet) using auxiliary fuel tanks is not recommended. The first step in the before-landing check was to select the main fuel tanks on both the left and right fuel selectors, respectively. The pilot indicated that he should have selected the main tanks sooner and performed the before-landing check earlier in the approach.
Probable cause:
A total loss of engine power during final approach due to fuel starvation as a result of the pilot’s delayed configuration of the airplane for landing.
Final Report:

Crash of a Short 360-300 in Watertown

Date & Time: Feb 5, 2006 at 1654 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N372AC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Milwaukee - Milwaukee
MSN:
3720
YOM:
1987
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
1524
Captain / Total hours on type:
630.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
519
Copilot / Total hours on type:
122
Aircraft flight hours:
21996
Circumstances:
Prior to departure, both flight crews decided that they would join-up while in flight to take video and still pictures of each airplane. Both aircraft were Shorts Brothers SD-360-300 turboprop airplanes. While flying in formation, N3735W announced over the radio that they would turn right, toward N372AC, and descend. During the turn, N3735W's left wing impacted the left wing and engine of N372AC. After the collision, N372AC rolled to the left and pitched down significantly before the flight crew regained control of the airplane. After the collision, N372AC was losing hydraulic fluid and eventually had a complete hydraulic system failure. The airplane made an emergency landing at a nearby airport with its flaps retracted and its landing gear partially extended. The airplane overran the end of the runway, coming to rest about 100 feet from the departure threshold. White paint transfer markings and scrapes were observed on the left wing deice boot, the outboard side of the left engine cowling was crushed inboard, the left wing-strut leading edge was torn open and bent, and the lower fuselage skin, immediately forward of the landing gear wheel wells and stub wing, was torn from left to right, consistent with a propeller strike. N3735W impacted terrain and the airplane was destroyed during a subsequent ground fire. The flight crew and passenger were killed. The outboard three-quarters of the left wing was separated from the main wreckage and was not fire damaged. The upper wing surface had linear scrapes diagonally across the wing skin. The left aileron from N3735W was found on the runway where N372AC had landed.
Probable cause:
The other airplane's flight crew failure to maintain clearance while maneuvering during formation flight. Contributing to the accident was the decision of both flight crews to fly in formation.
Final Report:

Crash of a Short 360-300 in Watertown: 3 killed

Date & Time: Feb 5, 2006 at 1654 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N3735W
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Milwaukee - Milwaukee
MSN:
3735
YOM:
1988
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
1643
Captain / Total hours on type:
1181.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
7015
Copilot / Total hours on type:
4984
Aircraft flight hours:
10077
Circumstances:
Prior to departure, both flight crews decided that they would join-up while in flight to take video and still pictures of each airplane. Both aircraft were Shorts Brothers SD-360-300 turboprop airplanes. While flying in formation, N3735W announced over the radio that they would turn right, toward N372AC, and descend. During the turn, N3735W's left wing impacted the left wing and engine of N372AC. After the collision, N372AC rolled to the left and pitched down significantly before the flight crew regained control of the airplane. After the collision, N372AC was losing hydraulic fluid and eventually had a complete hydraulic system failure. The airplane made an emergency landing at a nearby airport with its flaps retracted and its landing gear partially extended. The airplane overran the end of the runway, coming to rest about 100 feet from the departure threshold. White paint transfer markings and scrapes were observed on the left wing deice boot, the outboard side of the left engine cowling was crushed inboard, the left wing-strut leading edge was torn open and bent, and the lower fuselage skin, immediately forward of the landing gear wheel wells and stub wing, was torn from left to right, consistent with a propeller strike. N3735W impacted terrain and the airplane was destroyed during a subsequent ground fire. The flight crew and passenger were killed. The outboard three-quarters of the left wing was separated from the main wreckage and was not fire damaged. The upper wing surface had linear scrapes diagonally across the wing skin. The left aileron from N3735W was found on the runway where N372AC had landed.
Probable cause:
The flight crew failed to maintain clearance from another aircraft as they turned to break formation flight while maneuvering. Contributing to the accident was the decision of both flight crews to fly in formation.
Final Report:

Crash of a Dornier DO228-201 at Rothera Station

Date & Time: Jan 25, 2005 at 1433 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
D-CICE
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Halley - Rothera
MSN:
7073
YOM:
1985
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
0
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The aircraft christened 'Polar 4' was completing a flight from Halley to Rothera Station. Following a steep approach in marginal weather conditions with low clouds and snow falls, the aircraft landed hard and suffered substantial damages. There were no injuries but the aircraft was later transferred to Germany and declared damaged beyond repair in November 2005.

Crash of a Cessna 401B in Madrid: 2 killed

Date & Time: Oct 31, 1999 at 1222 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
EC-DEQ
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Madrid - Alicante
MSN:
401-0115
YOM:
1971
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
1629
Captain / Total hours on type:
100.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4612
Circumstances:
Just after takeoff from Madrid-Cuatro Vientos Airport, while in initial climb, the pilot informed ATC about engine problems and was cleared to return for an emergency landing. He made a turn and elected to establish on the ILS runway 28 when the aircraft entered an uncontrolled descent and crashed in a near vertical attitude in an orchard located 1,400 metres short of runway, some three minutes after takeoff. The aircraft was totally destroyed and both occupants were killed. The departed Madrid on an aerial photography mission to Alicante.
Probable cause:
Loss of control following an engine failure during initial climb. The exact cause of the engine failure could not be determined with certainty. However, the assumption that it may be the consequence of presence of water in the tanks and/or fuel lines was not ruled out.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 402B in Geneva: 2 killed

Date & Time: Feb 14, 1993 at 1043 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N69402
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Geneva - Geneva
MSN:
402B-0535
YOM:
1973
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
2750
Captain / Total hours on type:
12.00
Circumstances:
The aerial photo flight was commencing with the pilot and operator on board. A witness reported that the engines sounded good on the ground and during the t/o ground roll. At about 30 to 40 feet agl, he heard 'surging' sounds from the airplane. He then observed the aircraft in a shallow right hand turn as it approached departure end trees. He then saw the aircraft roll off to the left, into the trees in a steep, nose low, left wing low attitude. The aircraft crashed into trees and terrain and was destroyed by impact forces and fire. Investigation revealed that the aircraft impacted the ground in a left wing low attitude. The main wreckage was found inverted. An inspection of the engines did not reveal evidence of a mechanical failure or malfunction. Exam of both turbochargers revealed evidence of rotation at impact. Exam of both propellers revealed evidence of blade tip twisting toward low pitch and some forward bending. Both occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain minimum controllable airspeed during the initial climb, which resulted in a loss of aircraft control and collision with trees and terrain.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-31P-425 Pressurized Navajo in Delma Island: 4 killed

Date & Time: May 15, 1990
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
SP-FNA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Delma Island - Delma Island
MSN:
31-7400202
YOM:
1974
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft was returning to Delma Island Airport following a cartography mission over the area. On final, the aircraft went out of control and crashed short of runway, bursting into flames. All four occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Engine failure on short final for unknown reasons.

Crash of a Britten-Norman BN-2A-3 Islander near Antakya: 5 killed

Date & Time: Oct 20, 1989
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
TC-KUN
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Adana - Adana
MSN:
272
YOM:
1971
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft departed Adana on a special mission over the Hatay province consisting of the mapping of a forest area located along the border with Syria. While cruising about 20 km from the border, overt the Turkish territory, the aircraft was shot down by the pilot of a Syrian Air Force MiG-21 fighter. Out of control, the aircraft entered a dive and crashed near Antakya. All five occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Shot down by the pilot of a Syrian Air Force MiG-21 fighter.

Crash of a Rockwell Aero Commander 681 Mestersvig: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jul 23, 1973
Operator:
Registration:
SE-FGE
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Mestersvig - Mestersvig
MSN:
681-6033
YOM:
1969
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The crew was returning to Mestersvig Airport following a mapping mission. On final approach, the twin engine airplane crashed 400 meters short of runway threshold. Both occupants were killed.

Crash of a Rockwell Aero Commander 500 near Noxon: 2 killed

Date & Time: Apr 8, 1972 at 1315 LT
Registration:
N2776
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Walla Walla - Libby
MSN:
500-693
YOM:
1958
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
5131
Captain / Total hours on type:
57.00
Circumstances:
The crew was engaged in a mapping/photo mission from Walla Walla (Washington) to Libby, Montana. While cruising in poor weather conditions, the crew lost control of the airplane that dove into the ground and crashed in the region of Noxon. The wreckage was found June 16, 1972. The aircraft was totally destroyed and both pilots were killed.
Probable cause:
Uncontrolled descent caused by improper in-flight decisions or planning on part of the crew. The following factors were reported:
- Conditions conducive to carburetor/induction system icing,
- Ice-carburetor,
- Icing conditions including sleet and freezing rain,
- Airframe ice,
- Complete failure of both engines,
- Flew into icing conditions beyond capability of aircraft deicing systems.
Final Report: