Crash of a Rockwell Sabreliner 60SC in San Diego: 4 killed

Date & Time: Aug 16, 2015 at 1100 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N442RM
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
San Diego - San Diego
MSN:
306-073
YOM:
1974
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
On final approach to San Diego-Brown Field Airport, the aircraft collided with a Cessna 172 that was carrying one pilot. Following the collision, both aircraft dove into the ground and crashed in a field located two miles northeast of the airport. All five people on both aircraft were killed.

Crash of a Piper PA-46-350P Malibu Mirage in Concord: 4 killed

Date & Time: Dec 21, 2006 at 1101 LT
Registration:
N1AM
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
San Diego – Concord
MSN:
46-22061
YOM:
1989
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
3628
Captain / Total hours on type:
25.00
Aircraft flight hours:
2470
Circumstances:
While on an instrument approach for landing, the local tower air traffic controller observed on the BRITE radar repeater scope that the airplane passed the outer marker (OM), 600 feet below the permissible crossing altitude. The controller issued a low altitude alert to the pilot and cleared him to land. The controller also reminded the pilot that the minimum descent altitude for the Localizer Directional Aid (LDA) approach was 440 feet, and provided instructions for the missed approach. At that point the pilot reported that he had the airport in sight and acknowledged the landing instructions. The controller again cleared the pilot to land on the prescribed runway for the instrument approach, and the pilot acknowledged the landing clearance. Shortly thereafter the controller instructed the pilot to execute the missed approach as the radar track showed that the airplane was off course. The pilot was instructed to initiate a climbing left turn to the VOR. The pilot said he had the airport in sight and that he saw one of the cross runways and wanted to land. The controller told the pilot that circling to that runway was not an authorized procedure for the LDA approach and again instructed the pilot to perform the missed approach. A witness stated that he was working on a storage container, about 50 feet in height, when the airplane passed overhead. He estimated the airplane to be about 50 feet higher than the storage container. The airplane made a turn westbound and the witness looked away for a second. When he looked back the airplane was in a nose and left wing down attitude and then it impacted the ground. Another witness located on the airport's north-northeast corner also observed the airplane flying toward the airport. He reported simultaneously hearing the engine power up and observed the left wing stall prior to it impacting the ground. Both witnesses reported that they did not hear anything wrong with the engine. Examination of the airframe, power plant, and propeller revealed no mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. Internal damage signatures in the engine and propeller were consistent with the production of significant power at the time of impact. A review of the weather in the area revealed that while light rain and mist were occurring near the accident site, no meteorological phenomena existed that would have adversely affected the flight. The pilot and two passengers were killed while a third passenger, a boy aged 12, was seriously injured. He died from his injuries few hours later.
Probable cause:
Failure of the pilot to follow the prescribed instrument approach procedures and to maintain an adequate airspeed while maneuvering in the airport environment that led to a stall.
Final Report:

Crash of a Rockwell Gulfstream 690D Jetprop 900 in North Las Vegas: 1 killed

Date & Time: May 5, 2005 at 0914 LT
Registration:
N337DR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
North Las Vegas – San Diego
MSN:
690-15007
YOM:
1982
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
1880
Aircraft flight hours:
5026
Circumstances:
The passenger flying the airplane made a hard landing after the pilot had experienced an incapacitating cardiac event. Shortly after takeoff the pilot turned the plane around to return to the departure airport. He started coughing and then went unconscious. The passenger in the right seat, who had no piloting experience, took control of the airplane and made several landing attempts. During the fourth landing attempt he stalled the airplane at a low altitude. The airplane impacted terrain, landing flat on its belly a few hundred feet short of the runway. The autopsy report attributed the pilot's cause of death to arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease.
Probable cause:
The incapacitation of the pilot.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna T303 Crusader in San Diego

Date & Time: May 7, 1999 at 2230 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N3303S
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Houston – San Diego
MSN:
303-00018
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
25000
Captain / Total hours on type:
200.00
Aircraft flight hours:
1832
Circumstances:
The airplane departed Houston, Texas, for a VFR flight to San Diego, California. The pilot in the left seat said that they originally planned to purchase fuel at Gila Bend, Arizona, but were told that the fueling was closed. The left seat pilot said they elected to land at a private airstrip and made arrangements to have an individual drive to Casa Grande airport to purchase fuel for them. The left seat pilot said they were worried about adequate runway length, so they elected to only purchase 65 gallons of fuel for the remainder of the flight to San Diego. En route to San Diego, the right seat pilot obtained weather for the destination from FSS and was advised of 1,000-foot overcast ceiling. The right seat pilot then requested and received an instrument clearance. The TRACON controller advised the pilot of the accident airplane that he would have to keep speed up due to jet traffic or be given delay vectors for traffic spacing. The pilot told ATC that they were fuel critical and later said they had about 45 minutes to 1 hour of fuel. The right seat pilot was cleared for the localizer runway 27 approach. Approximately 18 minutes later, the pilot elected to do a missed approach because he was too high to land and moments later told San Diego radar that he was fuel critical and only had about 5 minutes of fuel left. San Diego radar began to give the pilot vectors to the closest airport and told the pilot not to descend any further. The right seat pilot replied that they were a glider and later told San Diego police that they had run out of fuel. There were no discrepancies noted with either the airframe or the engines during the postaccident aircraft examination.
Probable cause:
The pilot-in-command's inaccurate fuel consumption calculations that resulted in fuel exhaustion and the subsequent ditching.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna T207A Skywagon in Banning: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jun 9, 1994 at 1630 LT
Registration:
N6383H
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Burbank - San Diego
MSN:
207-0504
YOM:
1979
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
5032
Captain / Total hours on type:
1160.00
Circumstances:
The PA-28, N4512Z, was westbound in level flight about 1,000 feet agl, about 2 miles north of an airport at which an intermediate stop was planned. The Cessna T207A, N6383H, was maneuvering in left turns while conducting aerial photography, and had just initiated a turn toward the east. The left wings of each aircraft were struck by the other airplane. Witnesses indicated that about 2 seconds before impact, the PA-28 attempted to avoid a collision by beginning a climbing right turn. Each aircraft continued past the other and then both spiraled to the ground. The weather conditions were clear, visibility 3 miles in haze. Neither airplane was in radar or voice contact with any FAA facility. All three occupants in both aircraft were killed.
Probable cause:
The failure of both pilots to see and avoid each other. The haze was a factor.
Final Report: