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Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 near Petersburg: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jun 4, 2013 at 1531 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N616W
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Petersburg - Petersburg
MSN:
1290
YOM:
1958
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
4841
Captain / Total hours on type:
1465.00
Aircraft flight hours:
34909
Circumstances:
The pilot reported that the accident flight was his fourth flight and the third tour flight of the day in a float-equipped airplane. The weather had deteriorated throughout the day with lowering ceilings, light rain, and fog on the mountain ridges. The pilot said that when approaching a mountain pass, he initiated a climb by adding a “little bit” of flap (about 1 pump of the flap handle actuator) but did not adjust the engine power from the cruise power setting. He noted his airspeed at 80 knots, with a 200-feet-per-minute climb on the vertical speed indicator. He was having difficulty seeing over the cowling due to the nose-high attitude, when he suddenly noticed trees in his flight path. He initiated an immediate left turn; the airplane stalled, and began to drop, impacting the mountainous, tree-covered terrain. A passenger reported that the weather conditions at the time of the accident consisted of tufts of low clouds, and good visibility. They did not enter the clouds at any time during the flight. He reported that the airplane made a left turn, stalled, and then made a sharp left turn right before impact. The airplane seemed to be operating fine, and he heard no unusual sounds, other than the engine speed seemed to increase significantly right before impact. The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation, and the postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.
Probable cause:
The pilot’s failure to maintain adequate altitude above the trees, and his subsequent failure to maintain adequate airspeed while maneuvering to avoid the trees, which resulted in an
inadvertent aerodynamic stall/spin and an uncontrolled descent.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 414 Chancellor in Petersburg

Date & Time: Dec 2, 2004 at 1310 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N2EQ
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Petersburg - Petersburg
MSN:
414-0373
YOM:
1972
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3000
Captain / Total hours on type:
130.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
5600
Circumstances:
The purpose of the flight was to "check out" the airplane before delivering it to its new owner, and to provide the copilot with an indoctrination ride in the Cessna 414. During the approach, the pilot provided guidance and corrections to the copilot. The copilot flew the airplane to within 200 feet of the ground when the nose of the airplane yawed abruptly to the right. The pilot took control of the airplane, and pushed the engine and propeller controls to the full forward position. He placed the fuel pump switches to the "high" position, retracted the flaps, and attempted to retract the landing gear. With full left rudder and full left aileron applied, he could neither maintain directional control nor stop a roll to the right. The airplane struck the ground and continued into the parking area where it struck an airplane and a waste-oil tank. Examination of the airplane following the accident revealed that the landing gear was down and locked, and the propeller on the right engine was not feathered. The emergency procedure for an engine inoperative go-around required landing gear retraction and a feathered propeller on the inoperative engine. The pilot's handbook further stated, "Climb or continued level flight is improbable with the landing gear extended and the propeller windmilling." After the accident, both pilots stated that they didn't notice a power loss on the right engine until the copilot surrendered the flight controls. The right engine was removed and placed in a test cell. The engine started immediately on the first attempt and ran continuously without interruption.
Probable cause:
The partial loss of engine power for undetermined reasons, and the pilot's failure to maintain adequate airspeed (Vmc).
Final Report:

Crash of a Britten-Norman BN-2A-6 Islander near Sitka: 1 killed

Date & Time: Sep 5, 1988 at 1345 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N111VA
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Sitka - Petersburg
MSN:
215
YOM:
1970
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
9
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
4000
Captain / Total hours on type:
191.00
Circumstances:
The pilot encountered low ceilings, rain and fog while attempting to fly through a narrow mountain pass and successfully reversed course. He then flew into a small canyon off the main pass that terminated in a small glacier-covered bowl surrounded by steep rock walls. When it became apparent during a turn to reverse course that there was insufficient space to complete the maneuver before collision with a rock wall, the pilot retarded the throttles and crash landed on a glacier. A passenger was killed.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: in flight collision with terrain/water
Phase of operation: maneuvering - turn to reverse direction
Findings
1. (f) terrain condition - blind/box canyon
2. (c) in-flight planning/decision - improper - pilot in command
3. (f) weather condition - low ceiling
4. (f) aircraft weight and balance - exceeded - pilot in command
5. (f) weather condition - rain
6. (f) weather condition - fog
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 402B in Petersburg: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jun 22, 1974 at 1225 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N69379
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Richmond - Petersburg
MSN:
402B-0523
YOM:
1973
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
1600
Captain / Total hours on type:
29.00
Circumstances:
The crew (an instructor and a student pilot) departed Richmond, Virginia, on a training flight to Petersburg, Virginia. After several touch-and-go maneuvers, the twin engine airplane was landing when on touchdown, it struck the runway surface and the pilot elected to make a go-around. Out of control, the airplane veered off runway and came to rest in flames. The aircraft was destroyed and both occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
The aircraft went out of control upon landing after the crew failed to extend the landing gear. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Failed to maintain flying speed,
- Diverted attention from operation of aircraft,
- Examination of runway revealed prop slash marks right and left of runway centerline,
- Right propeller damaged, one blade broken, left propeller damaged.
Final Report: