Zone

Crash of a Gippsland GA-8 Airvan in Orange

Date & Time: Jul 6, 2010 at 1745 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-YBH
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Parkes - Orange
MSN:
GA8-08-131
YOM:
2008
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Pilot was performing a cargo flight from Parkes to Orange, New South Wales. On final approach, single engine aircraft was too low and hit the roof of a metal hangar located near the runway threshold. Aircraft stalled, hit the runway surface and lost its nose gear. It veered off runway and eventually collided with a metal hangar under construction. While the pilot was injured, the aircraft was destroyed.
Probable cause:
Wrong approach configuration on part of the pilot.

Crash of a Beechcraft 65-A90 King Air in Orange

Date & Time: Nov 16, 1996 at 1500 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N814SW
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Orange - Orange
MSN:
LJ-186
YOM:
1966
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
10
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
1170
Captain / Total hours on type:
40.00
Circumstances:
The pilot was taking off with 10 jumpers onboard. At the rotation speed of 100 knots, he used elevator trim to rotate the airplane, but it did not lift off the runway. He continued moving the trim wheel violently to pitch the nose up, and attempted to pull back on the yoke, but the airplane collided with rising terrain off the end of the runway. A witness did not see any of the flight controls move during the pilot preflight inspection, and during the takeoff roll, he did not observe a nose up rotation of the airplane. The pilot reported that he removed a single pin control lock from the yoke during preflight. The Beech control lock consisted of two pins, two chains, and a U-shaped engine control lock. The pilot walked away from the wreckage after the accident. No control locks were found in the wreckage. However, the control column shaft exhibited distress signatures on the periphery of the hole where the control lock is installed. No other evidence was found of any other form of mechanical jamming, interference, or discontinuity with the flight controls. Investigators were unable to identify any potential source of interference, other than a control lock, that could have simultaneously jammed both pitch and roll control. According to the airplane's manufacturer, about 3 to 6 degree of trim would have been normal for the airplane's takeoff conditions.
Probable cause:
The pilot's inadequate preflight inspection and his failure to complete the pre-takeoff checklist which resulted in a takeoff roll with the control lock in place.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft C90 King Air in Locust Grove: 6 killed

Date & Time: Nov 18, 1988 at 1833 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N308PS
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Orange - Locust Grove
MSN:
LW-92
YOM:
1974
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Captain / Total flying hours:
2300
Aircraft flight hours:
6964
Circumstances:
Before and during flight, the pilot received info about thunderstorms in the vicinity of the destination airport. During arrival, the pilot was given the Little Rock altimeter setting. He was cleared to descend and cross the NDB (initial approach fix) at or above 3,100 feet msl, then was cleared for the approach. About 7-1/2 minutes later, the pilot declared a missed approach and requested another. He acknowledged clearance for the 2nd approach, then there was no further radio contact with the aircraft. Subsequently, the aircraft hit trees and crashed on high (mtn) terrain about 6-1/2 miles west-southwest of the airport. Impact occurred while the aircraft was on an easterly heading at about 1,195 feet msl. Minimum altitude for the approach was 2,300 feet until established inbound from the NDB, then when using a Little Rock altimeter setting, a minimum altitude of 1,860 feet was required until passing the baiks fan marker, 4.6 miles from the runway. A pilot, who was waiting to depart the airport, estimated there was a variable overcast at 300 feet to 700 feet and the visibility was 1 to 2 miles with rain. The airport elevation was 464 feet. The aircraft was destroyed and all six occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain obstacle clearance altitude and exceeding the minimum descent altitude published in the approach procedure.
Occurrence #1: in flight collision with object
Phase of operation: approach - iaf to faf/outer marker (ifr)
Findings
1. (c) ifr procedure - not followed - pilot in command
2. (f) light condition - dark night
3. (f) weather condition - low ceiling
4. (f) weather condition - fog
5. Weather condition - rain
6. (f) terrain condition - mountainous/hilly
7. Object - tree(s)
8. (c) proper altitude - not maintained - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #2: in flight collision with terrain/water
Phase of operation: descent - uncontrolled
Final Report:

Crash of a Nord 262A-34 near Mézilhac: 21 killed

Date & Time: Jan 21, 1971 at 0940 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
44/F-RBOA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Vélizy-Villacoublay - Orange
MSN:
44
YOM:
1968
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
8
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
13
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
21
Circumstances:
The airplane departed Vélizy-Villacoublay Air Base on a special flight to Orange AFB, carrying six officers, seven engineers of the CEA - Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique (Central commission for nuclear energy) and a crew of eight who were scheduled to conduct an inspection of the nuclear center of Pierrelatte. The pilot was cleared by Marseille ATC to descent to 8,000 feet until Montélimar then to 5,000 feet to Orange. For unknown reason, the crew started the descent prematurely and in marginal weather conditions, the airplane stuck the slope of Mt Suc de Pradou (1,342 meters high) located about 3 km southeast of Mézilhac. The wreckage was found about 200 meters below the summit and all 21 occupants have been killed.
Crew:
Lt Pierre Chaintreau,
Adj/C Jean-Michel Reig,
Adj/C Jacques Deville,
Adj Alain Gaudy,
Sgt/C Claude Touzeau,
Sgt/C Jean-Pierre Boutin,
Off Alain Giblan,
Sdt Bertrand Courbier.
Passengers:
Amiral Robert Landrin,
Gen Édouard Billion,
Gen Jean-Marc Pineau,
Col Charles Birckel,
Col Alain Rolland de Chambaudoin d’Erceville,
Cpt André Bouteiller,
Jean Gaume, engineer,
Paul Johann, engineer,
Jean Labussière, engineer,
Hubert Lefèbvre de Laboulaye, engineer,
Jacques Mabile, engineer,
François Ronteix, engineer,
Georges Tirole, engineer.
Probable cause:
It is believed that the crew may misunderstood and mixed both altitude clearances of 8,000 feet till Montélimar and 5,000 feet till Orange, descending prematurely. In consequence, the accident was the result of a controlled flight into terrain.