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Crash of a Pilatus PC-12/47E near Chamberlain: 9 killed

Date & Time: Nov 30, 2019 at 1230 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N56KJ
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Chamberlain – Idaho Falls
MSN:
1431
YOM:
2013
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
11
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
9
Circumstances:
The single engine airplane departed Chamberlain Airport in marginal weather conditions. Few minutes later, while flying in snow falls, the airplane went out of control and crashed in a cornfield located about 30 miles west-southwest of Chamberlain. Three passengers aged 17, 27 and 28 were injured and evacuated to hospitals in Chamberlain, Mitchell and Sioux Falls while nine other occupants were killed.

Crash of a Beechcraft C90A King Air in Idaho Falls

Date & Time: Sep 19, 2013 at 1553 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N191TP
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Pocatello - Boise - Idaho Falls
MSN:
LJ-1223
YOM:
1989
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3975
Captain / Total hours on type:
2500.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4468
Circumstances:
The airplane was equipped with two main fuel tanks (132 usable gallons each) and two nacelle fuel tanks (60 usable gallons each). In normal operation, fuel from each nacelle tank is supplied to its respective engine, and fuel is automatically transferred from each main tank to its respective nacelle tank. While at the airplane's home airport, the pilot noted that the cockpit fuel quantity gauges indicated that the nacelle tanks were full, and he believed that the main tanks had fuel sufficient for 30 minutes of flight. The pilot did not verify by any other means the actual fuel quantity in any of the tanks. Thirty gallons of fuel were added to each main tank; they were not topped off. The airplane, with two passengers, then flew to an interim stop about 45 miles away, where a third passenger boarded. The airplane then flew to its destination, another 165 miles away. The pilot reported that, at the destination airport, he noted that the cockpit fuel quantity gauges indicated that the nacelle tanks were full; he surmised that the main fuel tanks were not empty but did not note the actual quantity of fuel. Forty gallons of fuel were added to each main tank. Again, the main tanks were not topped off, and the pilot did not verify by any other means the actual fuel quantity in any of the tanks. The return flight to the interim stop was uneventful. The third passenger deplaned there, and the airplane departed for its home airport. While on final approach to the home airport, both engines stopped developing power, and the pilot conducted a forced landing to a field about 1.2 miles short of the runway. The pilot later reported that, at the time of the power loss, the fuel quantity gauges indicated that there was still fuel remaining in the airplane. Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that all four fuel tanks were devoid of fuel. The examination did not reveal any preimpact mechanical anomalies, including fuel leaks, that would have precluded continued flight. The airplane manufacturer conducted fuel-consumption calculations for each of the two city pairs. Because the pilot did not provide any information regarding flight routes, altitudes, speeds, or times for any of the flight segments, the manufacturer's calculations were based on direct routing in zero-wind conditions, nominal airplane and engine performance, and assumed cruise altitudes and speeds. Although the results are valid for these input parameters, variations in any of the input parameters can significantly affect the calculated fuel requirements. As a result, although the manufacturer's calculations indicated that the round trip would have burned less fuel than the total available fuel quantity that was derived from the pilot-provided information, the lack of any definitive information regarding the actual flight parameters limited the utility of the calculated value and the comparison. The manufacturer's calculations indicated that the accident flight leg (from the interim airport to the home airport) would have consumed about 28.5 gallons total. Given that the airplane was devoid of fuel at the accident site, the pilot likely departed the interim airport with significantly less than the manufacturer's minimum allowable departure fuel quantity of about 39.5 gallons per side. The lack of any observed preimpact mechanical problems with the airplane, combined with the lack of objective or independently substantiated fuel quantity information, indicates that the airplane's fuel exhaustion was due to the pilot's inadequate and improper pre- and inflight fuel planning and procedures.
Probable cause:
The pilot's inadequate preflight fuel planning, which resulted in departure with insufficient fuel to complete the flight, and consequent inflight power loss due to fuel exhaustion.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-31 Navajo Chieftain in Idaho: 3 killed

Date & Time: Mar 12, 2002 at 1437 LT
Registration:
N2336V
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Idaho Falls-Boisé
MSN:
31-135
YOM:
1968
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
20647
Captain / Total hours on type:
338.00
Aircraft flight hours:
7940

Crash of a Cessna 425 Conquest in Idaho Falls: 2 killed

Date & Time: Nov 10, 2000 at 1215 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N41054
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Idaho Falls-Idaho Falls
MSN:
425-0172
YOM:
1983
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
8000
Aircraft flight hours:
4027

Crash of a Piper PA-31T-620 Cheyenne II in Cody: 3 killed

Date & Time: May 20, 1987 at 1722 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N2336X
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Idaho Falls - Cody
MSN:
31-8120002
YOM:
1981
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
6500
Circumstances:
N2336X was on a business flight to Cody, WY. The pilot executed a missed approach on the first attempt of the VOR-A approach. A pilot who landed at Cody minutes before the accident said the visibility had decreased to 3/4 of a mile when N2336X made the first approach and approx 1/2 mile when N2336X crashed. Examination of the wreckage revealed no evidence of a mechanical malfunction or failure of the aircraft prior to accident. The sas servo arm was found in the full up position. The aircraft struck the terrain in a steep nose low attitude on a heading that was opposite to the direction of flight. Approach minimums at Cody are 5,800 feet and 1 mile visibility. All three occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: in flight encounter with weather
Phase of operation: circling (ifr)
Findings
1. (f) weather condition - below approach/landing minimums
2. (f) weather condition - low ceiling
3. (f) weather condition - snow
4. (c) in-flight planning/decision - improper - pilot in command
5. (c) ifr procedure - improper - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #2: loss of control - in flight
Phase of operation: circling (ifr)
Findings
6. (c) airspeed - not maintained - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #3: in flight collision with terrain/water
Phase of operation: descent - uncontrolled
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna T303 Crusader near Willard: 5 killed

Date & Time: Jan 3, 1983 at 1818 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N6087C
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Portland - Idaho Falls
MSN:
303-00144
YOM:
1982
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
7657
Captain / Total hours on type:
100.00
Aircraft flight hours:
25
Circumstances:
Before takeoff, the pilot received a weather briefing and filed an IFR flight plan to Idaho Falls, ID at 13,000 feet. He took off at 1804 pst. At 1814 pst, just prior to calling level at 13,000 feet, he reported he was encountering light turbulence and light rime ice. Approximately four min later, the pilot reported experiencing heavy vibrations. He requested and received a clearance to return to Portland and descend to 7,000 feet. Shortly after that, the aircraft entered a tight descending turn which the pilot reported he was having difficulty arresting. He reported regaining directional control at 6,000 feet and said the aircraft had a heavy load of ice. Shortly thereafter, the aircraft crashed in mountains at the 3,130 feet level. Due to damage from impact and wreckage retrieval, the preimpact condition of all deicing components was not verified. The aircraft was not certified for flight in known icing conditions. Moderate mixed icing condition and moderate turbulence were forecast. The pilot was briefed there had been reports of moderate icing thru-out the area. All five occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: in flight encounter with weather
Phase of operation: climb - to cruise
Findings
1. (f) weather condition - turbulence in clouds
2. (f) weather condition - icing conditions
3. (c) flight into known adverse weather - continued - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #2: loss of control - in flight
Phase of operation: descent
Findings
4. (c) wing - ice
5. (c) stabilizer - ice
6. (c) aircraft performance - deteriorated
7. (c) spiral - uncontrolled - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #3: in flight collision with terrain/water
Phase of operation: descent
Findings
8. (f) terrain condition - mountainous/hilly
9. (f) terrain condition - high terrain
Final Report:

Crash of a Consolidated B-24J-40-CO Liberator near Idaho Falls: 7 killed

Date & Time: Jan 8, 1944 at 2040 LT
Operator:
Registration:
42-73365
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Pocatello - Pocatello
MSN:
2935
YOM:
1942
Crew on board:
7
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Circumstances:
The crew was engaged in a night training flight in the region of Idaho Falls and Pocatello. En route, pilot lost control of the aircraft that crashed in a desert area located some 50 km west of Idaho Falls. All seven crewmen were killed.
Crew:
Richard A. Hedges,
Lonnie L. Keepers,
Robert W. Madsen,
Richard R. Pitzner,
Louis H. Rinke,
Charles W. Eddy,
George H. Pearce Jr.

Crash of a Consolidated B-24D Liberator in Idaho Falls

Date & Time: Jun 10, 1943
Operator:
Registration:
40-699
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
170
YOM:
1941
Crew on board:
0
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Crashed landed at Idaho Falls Airport. No casualties.