Zone

Crash of a Cessna 441 Conquest II in Battle Creek

Date & Time: Mar 27, 2012 at 0730 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N1212C
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Muskegon - Aurora
MSN:
441-0346
YOM:
1984
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
20154
Captain / Total hours on type:
13000.00
Circumstances:
After the pilot finished the preflight inspection in the hangar, the maintenance technician pulled the airplane out of the hangar and connected the auxiliary power cart to the airplane. Shortly thereafter, the pilot boarded the airplane and proceeded with the normal checklist. The pilot signaled to the maintenance technician to disconnect the power cart. The maintenance technician subsequently signaled that the pilot was clear to start the engines. After departure, the pilot noted a problem with the landing gear, and, after establishing that the tow bar was, most likely, still attached to the nosewheel, he diverted to a nearby airport for a precautionary landing. During the landing, the nose landing gear collapsed and the primary structure in the nose of the airplane was substantially damaged.
Probable cause:
The maintenance technician did not remove the tow bar prior to the flight.
Final Report:

Crash of a Rockwell Grand Commander 690A in Lansing: 2 killed

Date & Time: Sep 27, 1993 at 1123 LT
Registration:
N242TC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Lansing - Battle Creek
MSN:
690-11219
YOM:
1974
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
8790
Aircraft flight hours:
4373
Circumstances:
The airplane departed in IMC conditions on an IFR flight plan. Shortly after takeoff the pilot told the departure controller he had '...a problem.' The airplane's flight path was a series of left hand turns while performing descents and ascents. Reports of engine sounds varied from high rpm to low rpm. Many witnesses reported the airplane descending out of, and climbing into, clouds. The airplane was observed in a 45° angle descent, right wing low, as it collided with trees and the ground. The on-scene investigation found an intermittent electric gyro system inverter, a broken filament on the inverter power 'out' light bulb, electrically powered gyro's rotors did not have rotational damage, and a vacuum powered attitude indicator rotor with rotational damage. The pilot's toxicology report stated 45 mg/dl of ethanol detected in his muscle tissue.
Probable cause:
The pilot-in-command not maintaining aircraft control during the intermittent operation of the electrically operated attitude gyro. Factor's associated with this accident are an fluctuating (intermittent) electrical system inverter and the pilot-in-command not performing remedial action by using the vacuum powered attitude gyro and other flight instruments once the airplane was making a series of climbs, descents, and heading changes.
Final Report:

Crash of a Dassault Falcon 10 in Chicago: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jan 30, 1980 at 1548 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N253K
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Chicago - Battle Creek
MSN:
10
YOM:
1974
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
3453
Captain / Total hours on type:
635.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
8845
Copilot / Total hours on type:
1163
Aircraft flight hours:
3196
Circumstances:
The airplane was unable to takeoff from Chicago-Merrill C. Meigs Airport runway 18, overran and crashed into Lake Michigan. A pilot and a passenger were killed while four other occupants were seriously injured. The aircraft came to rest in 25 feet of water about 300 feet past the runway end.
Probable cause:
The flightcrew's failure to release the parking brake before the takeoff roll was started, which resulted in significant wheel/brake drag and a nosedown pitching moment that inhibited the aircraft's capability to effect a normal acceleration and rotation for takeoff. Contributing to the accident was the lack of adequate company checklist procedures to insure the timely release of the parking brakes.
Final Report:

Crash of a Lockheed P-3A-60-LO Orion near Battle Creek: 4 killed

Date & Time: Jul 4, 1966 at 2040 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
152172
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Floyd Bennett Field – Glenview – Moffett
MSN:
185-5142
YOM:
1965
Flight number:
PE-05
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
The crew departed Floyd Bennett Field Airport in New York on a flight to Moffett Airbase, California, with an intermediate stop at Glenview Airport, Illinois, under call sign PE-05. At 2035LT, while cruising at an altitude of 22,000 feet, the crew informed ATC about his position. Shortly later, the airplane entered a spin, crossed the last cloud layer at an altitude of 3,000 feet in a right turn and struck the ground in a 60° nose down attitude at a speed of 800 km/h. The aircraft disintegrated on impact and all four crew members were killed. The wreckage was found seven miles northeast of Battle Creek.
Crew:
Lt William E. Xiques, pilot,
Lt John P. Fitzmaurice III, copilot,
ADJ2 Charles J. Lurvey, flight engineer,
ADJ3 Larry W. Battson, flight engineer.
Probable cause:
Investigations determined that there was no in-flight fire and no major structural failure had occurred. The plane was only about a year old at the time of the accident. The only clues were unintelligible voice transmissions at 2037 and again at 2039. The voice was masked by extreme high frequency background noise. Despite attempted computer analysis of the voice and an extended accident investigation, the cause was never determined. It was believed that some kind of catastrophic failure had occurred that incapacitated the crew. It was also surmised that it was possible that the windshield failed in-flight under decompression forces causing sound comparable to high velocity air in the cockpit. Not enough of the windshield was recovered to perform an analysis and come to any conclusions about this possibility.

Crash of a Douglas C-47-DL in Cincinnati: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jan 12, 1955 at 0904 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N999B
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Battle Creek – Lexington – Miami
MSN:
4255
YOM:
1942
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The crew departed Battle Creek Airport at 0733LT bound for Miami with an intermediate stop at Lexington, Kentucky. While cruising at an altitude between 700 and 900 feet, the left wing of the aircraft collided with the right engine of a Trans World Airlines (TWA) Martin 202 registered N93211 that just took off from Cincinnati-Greater Cincinnati Airport. Following the collision, both aircraft went into a dive and crashed in a snow covered field and a wooded area located in the suburb of Cincinnati. Both aircraft were completely destroyed upon impact and all 15 occupants on both airplanes were killed.
Probable cause:
The probable cause of this accident was operation of the DC-3 in the control zone as unknown traffic, without clearance, very close to the base of, or in, the overcast.
Final Report: