Country
code

Oise

Crash of an Antonov AN-2 in Betz

Date & Time: Jun 15, 2008
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
F-AZHB
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Lille - Lognes
MSN:
173 473 09
YOM:
1957
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On approach to Lognes-Emerainville Airport, pilot encountered engine problem and elected to make an emergency landing in a field located in Betz, Oise. On touch down, aircraft sunk into mud, overturned and came to rest on its back. All four occupants were rescued and a passenger was slightly injured. Aircraft was considered as damaged beyond economical repair and was later cannibalised.
Probable cause:
Engine failure.

Crash of a Piper PA-31-310 Navajo in Creil: 2 killed

Date & Time: May 19, 1982
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
G-BBML
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
31-7401210
YOM:
1974
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The twin engine airplane was completing a flight from south of France to Liverpool when it crashed in unknown circumstances in Creil, about 45 km north of Paris. The aircraft was destroyed and both occupants were killed.

Crash of a Douglas DC-10-10 in Ermenonville: 346 killed

Date & Time: Mar 3, 1974 at 1141 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
TC-JAV
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Ankara - Paris - London
MSN:
46704
YOM:
1972
Flight number:
TK981
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
12
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
334
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
346
Captain / Total flying hours:
7003
Captain / Total hours on type:
438.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
5589
Copilot / Total hours on type:
628
Aircraft flight hours:
2955
Circumstances:
On Sunday March 3, 1974 flight TK981 departed Istanbul for a flight to Paris and London. The DC-10 landed at Paris-Orly at 11:02 and taxied to stand A2. There were 167 passengers on board, of whom 50 disembarked. The aircraft was refueled and baggage was loaded onto the plane. The planned turnaround time of one hour was delayed by 30 minutes. An additional 216 passengers embarked. Most of the passengers were booked on this flight because of a strike at British Airways. The door of the aft cargo compartment on the left-hand side was closed at about 11:35. When all preparations were complete the flight received permission to taxi to runway 08 at 12:24. Four minutes later the crew were cleared to line up for departure and were cleared for departure route 181 and an initial climb to flight level 40. The aircraft took off at approximately 12:30 and was cleared by Orly Departure to climb to FL60, which was reached at 12:34. The North Area Control Centre then cleared TK981 further to FL230. Three or four seconds before 12:40:00 hours, the noise of decompression was heard and the co-pilot said: "the fuselage has burst" and the pressurization aural warning sounded. This was caused by the opening and separation of the aft left-hand cargo door. The pressure difference in the cargo bay and passenger cabin, the floor above the cargo door partly collapsed. Two occupied tripe seat units were ejected from the aircraft. All the horizontal stabilizer and elevator control cables routed beneath the floor of the DC-10 and were thus also severely disrupted. Also the no. 2 engine power was lost almost completely. The aircraft turned 9 deg to the left and pitched nose down. The nose-down attitude increased rapidly to -20 deg. Although the no. 1 and 3 engines were throttled back the speed increased to 360 kts. The pitch attitude then progressively increased to -4 degrees and the speed became steady at 430 kts (800 km/h). At a left bank of 17 degrees the DC-10 crashed into the forest of Ermenonville, 37 km NE of Paris. The aircraft disintegrated on impact and all 346 occupants were killed, among them 48 Japanese citizens and almost 250 British people.
Probable cause:
The accident was the result of the ejection in flight of the aft cargo door on the left-hand side: the sudden depressurization which followed led to the disruption of the floor structure, causing six passengers and parts of the aircraft to be ejected, rendering No.2 engine inoperative and impairing the flight controls (tail surfaces) so that it was impossible for the crew to regain control of the aircraft. The underlying factor in the sequence of events leading to the accident was the incorrect engagement of the door latching mechanism before take-off. The characteristics of the design of the mechanism made it possible for the vent door to be apparently closed and the cargo door apparently locked when in fact the latches were not fully closed and the lock pins were not in place. It should be noted, however that a view port was provided so that there could be a visual check of the engagement of the lock pins. This defective closing of the door resulted from a combination of various factors:
- Incomplete application of Service Bulletin 52-37;
- Incorrect modifications and adjustments which led, in particular, to insufficient protrusion of the lock pins and to the switching off of the flight deck visual warning light before the door was locked;
- The circumstances of the closure of the door during the stop at Orly, and, in particular, the absence of any visual inspection, through the viewport to verify that the lock pins were effectively engaged, although at the time of the accident inspection was rendered difficult by the inadequate diameter of the view port.
Finally, although there was apparent redundancy of the flight control systems, the fact that the pressure relief vents between the cargo compartment and the passenger cabin were inadequate and that all the flight control cables were routed beneath the floor placed the aircraft in grave danger in the case of any sudden depressurization causing substantial damage to that part of the structure. All these risks had already become evident, nineteen months earlier, at the time of the Windsor accident, but no efficacious corrective action had followed.
Final Report:

Crash of an Airspeed AS.57 Ambassador 2 in Beauvais

Date & Time: Apr 14, 1966
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-ALZX
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
London - Beauvais
MSN:
5220
YOM:
1951
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
55
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On final approach to Beauvais-Tillé Airport, the aircraft was too high on the glide after it broke out from the clouds. Rather than making a go around procedure, the crew continued the approach but landed too far down the runway 13. Unable to stop within the remaining distance of 3,500 feet, the airplane overran, lost its left main gear and nose gear and came to rest against a mount of earth. At the time of the accident, the runway surface was wet, which was considered as a contributing factor.
Probable cause:
Wrong approach configuration on part of the flying crew.

Crash of a Lockheed 18-56-24 LodeStar in Creil

Date & Time: Jun 22, 1962
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
F-BKBY
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
2363
YOM:
1943
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
0
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
While flying in the vicinity of the Creil Airbase, the twin engine aircraft was too low and struck trees, causing one of the engine to fail. The pilot was forced to attempt an emergency landing in a field. There were no injuries but the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Douglas DC-3 in Beauvais: 9 killed

Date & Time: Mar 18, 1955
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
F-BAXL
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Beauvais - Beauvais
MSN:
20047
YOM:
1944
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
9
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
9
Circumstances:
The crew was conducting a local training flight at Beauvais-Tillé Airport. On takeoff from runway 31, the airplane encountered difficulties to gain height, hit power cables and crashed in a field. The aircraft was destroyed and all nine occupants were killed.

Crash of a SNCAC NC.702 Martinet in Pontarmé: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jul 22, 1946
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
F-BBFA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Nice – Paris
MSN:
0124
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Aircraft flight hours:
76
Circumstances:
While descending to Paris-Le Bourget Airport while on a mail flight from Nice, the twin engine aircraft went into a nose down attitude and crashed in a huge explosion in a field located in Pontarmé, south of Senlis. The aircraft was destroyed and both crewmen were killed. Brand new, the aircraft was delivered to Air France last February 21st.
Crew:
Jean Moreau, pilot,
André Furelaud, radio navigator.

Crash of a Douglas DC-2-115B in Senlis: 5 killed

Date & Time: Jan 7, 1939 at 1630 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
HB-ITA
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Zurich – Paris
MSN:
1329
YOM:
1935
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
12
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
While descending to Paris-Le Bourget Airport in marginal weather conditions, the crew did not realize he was flying too low. The twin engine aircraft hit the ground and lost partially its both wings before coming to rest in an open field located in Senlis, some 25 km north of Le Bourget Airport. The cabin remained relatively intact while the cockpit was destroyed. Five occupants were killed, among them three crew members.
Crew killed:
Egon Frei, pilot,
Kurt Walter, radio navigator,
Josie Brooke, stewardess.

Crash of a Waco UIC in Mont-l’Évêque: 4 killed

Date & Time: Jan 19, 1937 at 1445 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
PH-MAG
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Paris – Rotterdam
MSN:
3790
YOM:
1933
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
Aircraft left Paris-Le Bourget Airport at 1415LT on a flight to Rotterdam with two passengers and a crew of two on board. Thirty minutes after take off, while cruising at an altitude of 300 metres, the aircraft banked left, stalled and crashed in a swampy area located in Mont-l'Evêque, east of Senlis. All four occupants were killed. Crew was repatriating the aircraft to The Netherlands as his owner, Mr. M. A. G. van der Leeuw, died in another Waco crash near Rotterdam last 3rd of December 1936.
Crew:
Joachim Tissot, pilot,
Albertus Sommer, pilot.
Passengers:
Adriamis Hoertens
Jacob Maltha.
Probable cause:
L’accident est imputable à une rupture en vol de la cellule gauche à la suite, semble t-il, d’une ressource consécutive soit à une descente en vrille, soit à une descente en spirale et en piqué. Le pilote qui, à un moment donné se trouvait dans les nuages, aurait donc, pour une cause que la commission n’a pu préciser, perdre le contrôle de l’avion. Celui-ci se serait alors engagé en vrille ou en piqué accentué et le pilote l’aurait vivement redressé à la vue du sol, au sortir des nuages. Il convient d’observer que la charge maximum de 1'540 kilos indiquée sur le certificat de navigabilité était largement atteinte et que la vitesse de l’avion devait, au moment où il fut redressé, se trouver très près de la vitesse limite de 300 km/h et qu’il ne pouvait, dans ces conditions, résister à l’accélération due à une ressource brutale.

Crash of a Fokker F7/3m in Silly-le-Long: 2 killed

Date & Time: Apr 21, 1936
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
OO-AIF
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Paris – Brussels – Cologne
YOM:
1929
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
Crew was performing a cargo flight from Paris to Cologne with an intermediate stop in Brussels. Few minutes after takeoff from Paris-Le Bourget Airport, the three engine aircraft went out of control and crashed in Silly-le-Long, some 30 km northeast of Le Bourget Airport. Both crew were killed.