Crash of a Piaggio P.180 Avanti off Puerto Limón: 6 killed

Date & Time: Oct 23, 2022 at 1855 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
D-IRSG
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Palenque – Puerto Limón
MSN:
1196
YOM:
2009
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Circumstances:
The airplane departed Palenque Airport, Chiapas, on a private flight to Puerto Limón, Costa Rica. While on approach at an altitude of about 2,000 feet at night, the airplane entered an uncontrolled descent and crashed into the sea some 28 km southeast of the destination airport. The accident occurred three minutes prior to ETA. Few debris and two dead bodies were found two days later. On board were the German businessman Rainer Schaller, founder of the fitness chain 'McFit', his wife, two children and a friend.

Crash of a Boeing 757-27A in San José

Date & Time: Apr 7, 2022 at 1024 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
HP-2010DAE
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
San José – Guatemala City
MSN:
29610/904
YOM:
1999
Flight number:
DHL7216
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The airplane departed San José-Juan Santamaría Airport runway 07 at 0940LT bound for Guatemala City, carrying two pilots and a load of various goods. When the crew reached FL210, he declared an emergency and reported technical problems with the hydraulic system. After being cleared to return, the crew followed a holding pattern and the aircraft landed on runway 07 at 1024LT. After touchdown, the crew initiated the braking procedure then the aircraft started to veer to the right, apparently to vacate via taxiway Delta and Kilo. It skidded to the right, made an almost 90° turn, descended a bank, lost its undercarriage and came to rest in a grassy area located about five metres below the runway elevation, broken in two. Both pilots evacuated with minor injuries.

Crash of a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan in Punta Islita: 12 killed

Date & Time: Dec 31, 2017 at 1216 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
TI-BEI
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Punta Islita – San José
MSN:
208B-0900
YOM:
2001
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
10
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
12
Captain / Total flying hours:
14508
Captain / Total hours on type:
11587.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
453
Aircraft flight hours:
12073
Circumstances:
The two pilots were conducting a commercial charter flight to take 10 passengers to an international airport for connecting flights. The flight departed a nontower-controlled airport that was in a valley surrounded on all sides by rising terrain, with the exception of the area beyond the departure end of runway 21, which led directly toward the Pacific Ocean. The accident airplane was the second of a flight of two; the first airplane departed runway 3 about 15 minutes before the accident airplane and made an immediate right turn to the east/southeast after takeoff, following a pass in the hills over lower terrain that provided time for the airplane to climb over the mountains. Both a witness and surveillance video footage from the airport indicated that, 15 minutes later, the accident airplane also departed from runway 3 but instead continued on runway heading, then entered a left turn and descended into terrain. Analysis of the video determined that the airplane reached a maximum bank angle of about 75° and an airspeed below the airplane's published aerodynamic stall speed before impact. Examination of the airplane was limited due to impact and postcrash fire damage; however, no defects consistent with a preimpact failure or malfunction were observed, and the engine exhibited signatures consistent with production of power during impact. The captain was appropriately rated and had extensive experience in the accident airplane make and model. He had been employed by the accident operator for about a year in 2006 and had recently been re-hired by the operator; however, records provided by the operator did not indicate that he had completed all of the training and check flights required by the operator's General Operations Manual (GOM). The first officer was appropriately rated but had little experience in the accident airplane. The GOM also stated that pilots would receive additional, airport-specific training before operating to or from airports with special characteristics; however, the operator provided no listing of such airports, including the airport from which the accident flight departed. The pilots' experience at the departure airport could not be determined. It is possible the psychiatric diagnoses in 2011 were correct and the pilot suffered from a number of conditions which can cause a variety of symptoms. However, given the extremely limited information, what his symptoms were around the time of the accident, whether they were being addressed or effectively treated, and what his mental state was at the time could not be determined from the available information. Therefore, whether or not the pilot's medical or psychological conditions or their treatment played a role in the accident circumstances could not be determined by this investigation. There were no weather reporting facilities in the vicinity of the airport. Although the airport was equipped with two frames for windsocks, no windsocks were installed at the time of the accident to aid pilots in determining wind direction and intensity. Although a takeoff from runway 21 afforded the most favorable terrain since the airplane would fly over lower terrain to the ocean, it is possible that a significant enough tailwind existed for runway 21 that the pilots believed the airplane's maximum tailwind takeoff limitation may be exceeded and chose to depart from runway 3 in the absence of any information regarding the wind velocity. Performance calculations showed that the airplane would have been able to take off with up to a 10-kt tailwind, which was the manufacturer limitation for tailwind takeoffs. The witness who saw the accident reported that he spoke with the pilots of both airplanes before the flights departed and that the pilots acknowledged the need to use the eastern pass in order to clear terrain when departing from runway 3. The reason that the flight crew of the accident airplane failed to use this path after takeoff could not be determined. It is likely that, after entering the valley ahead of the runway, with rising terrain and peaks that likely exceeded the climb capability of the airplane, they attempted to execute a left turn to exit the valley toward lower terrain. During the steep turn, the pilots failed to maintain adequate airspeed and exceeded the airplane's critical angle of attack, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall and impact with terrain. Performance calculations using weights that would allow the airplane to operate within manufacturer weight and balance limitations at the time of the accident indicated that it was unlikely that the airplane would have had sufficient climb performance to clear the terrain north of the airport. However, the airplane would likely have had sufficient climb performance to clear terrain east of the airport had the crew performed a right turn immediately after takeoff like the previous airplane.
Probable cause:
The flight crew's failure to maintain airspeed while maneuvering to exit an area of rising terrain, which resulted in an exceedance of the airplane's critical angle of attack and an aerodynamic stall. Contributing to the accident was the flight crew's decision to continue the takeoff toward rising terrain that likely exceeded the airplane's climb capability, the lack of adequate weather reporting available for wind determination, and the lack of documented training for an airport requiring a non-standard departure.
Final Report:

Crash of a Rockwell Sabreliner 75 in San José

Date & Time: Sep 3, 2007
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N726JR
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
San José – Cartagena
MSN:
370-4
YOM:
1971
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
During the takeoff roll from San José-Juan Santamaria Airport runway 07, one of the tyre burst. The captain decided to abandon the takeoff procedure and initiated an emergency braking manoeuvre. Unable to stop within the remaining distance, the aircraft overran, lost its undercarriage, hit obstacles and came to rest near the perimeter fence. All six occupants escaped uninjured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Gippsland GA8 Airvan in Monteverde National Park: 1 killed

Date & Time: Nov 2, 2006 at 0530 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
TI-BAH
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
San José – Liberia
MSN:
GA8-05-069
YOM:
2003
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The pilot, sole on board, departed San José-Alajuela-Juan Santamaria Airport at 0500LT on a positioning flight to Liberia-Daniel Oduber Quiros Airport located in the Guanacaste cordillera. About 30 minutes into the flight, the single engine aircraft crashed in unknown circumstances in the Monteverde National Park. The aircraft was destroyed and the pilot was killed.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-6 Twin Otter 300 in Tamarindo

Date & Time: Dec 16, 2005 at 1150 LT
Operator:
Registration:
TI-AZQ
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
San José - Tamarindo
MSN:
805
YOM:
1984
Flight number:
5C330
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
5297
Circumstances:
Following an uneventful flight from San José-Tobías Bolaños Airport, the crew started the descent to Tamarindo Airport runway 07. On short final, at a height of about 500 feet, control was lost and the aircraft crashed in a wooded area located 2 km short of runway. All eight occupants were injured while the aircraft was destroyed.
Probable cause:
The accident was the consequence of a loss of control on short final following the combination of the following factors:
- An elevator cable probably broke away due to a progressive wear combined with a damaged pulley,
- The proximity of the terrain,
- The low speed of the aircraft,
- The lack of crew training in such situation,
- The loss of control of the aircraft occurred at a critical phase of the flight, initially caused by a mechanical failure and later to human factors.

Crash of a Pilatus PC-6/B2-H4 Turbo Porter off Brasilito: 6 killed

Date & Time: Jul 16, 2005 at 0945 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N908PL
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Tamarindo - Tamarindo
MSN:
908
YOM:
1994
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Circumstances:
The single engine aircraft departed Tamarindo on a sightseeing flight with five passengers and one pilot on board. While flying at low height, the aircraft went out of control and crashed in the sea some 1,300 metres offshore. The aircraft sank by a depth of 50 metres and all six occupants were killed.

Crash of a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan near Quepos: 3 killed

Date & Time: Nov 29, 2001 at 1148 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
HP-1405APP
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
San José – Quepos – Puerto Jiménez
MSN:
208B-0788
YOM:
1999
Flight number:
LRS1625
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
5000
Copilot / Total flying hours:
800
Aircraft flight hours:
1955
Circumstances:
The single engine airplane departed San José Airport on a schedule flight to Puerto Jiménez with an intermediate stop in Quepos, carrying six passengers (3 Americans, 2 Germans and one Dutch) and two pilots. While descending in clouds to Quepos Airport, the aircraft collided with trees and crashed on the slope of a wooded mountain located about 13 km from Quepos Airport. Both pilots and one passenger were killed while five other passengers were seriously injured. The aircraft was totally destroyed by impact forces.
Probable cause:
Collision with terrain after the captain failed to ensure that the vertical, horizontal and lateral separation was sufficient to fly over the mountains while descending under VMC conditions. Also the crew failed to take appropriate corrective actions to prevent the aircraft to continue the descent until it impacted ground, resulting in a controlled flight into terrain. The following contributin factors were identified:
- Momentary loss of situational awareness on the part of the flight crew,
- Inadequate supervision by the pilot-in-command,
- Non-compliance with standard operating procedures published by the operator,
- Use of flight procedures neither written down in manuals nor approved by the authority,
- Violation of safety rules,
- Non-application of visual flight rules by the flight crew,
- Shortcomings in the crew resources management,
- Adverse weather conditions.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 402B in Nosara

Date & Time: Dec 20, 2000 at 1045 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N908AB
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Nosara - San José
MSN:
402B-0908
YOM:
1975
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On December 20, 2000, about 1045 mountain standard time, a Cessna 402B, N908AB, registered to Pitts Aviation, Inc., and operated by TS Aviation, as a Costa Rican air taxi flight from Nosara, Costa Rica, to San Jose, Costa Rica, crashed while making a forced landing following loss of engine power shortly after takeoff from Nosara. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed. The aircraft was destroyed and the pilot and one passenger received serious injuries. Five passengers received minor injuries. The flight was originating at the time of the accident. Civil aviation authorities reported the flight had a loss of power in one engine during initial climb after takeoff, was unable to maintain altitude, and collided with trees. A post crash fire erupted.
Probable cause:
Engine failure for unknown reasons.

Crash of a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan on Mt Arenal: 10 killed

Date & Time: Aug 26, 2000 at 1210 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
HP-1357APP
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
San Juan – La Fortuna – Tamarindo
MSN:
208-0709
YOM:
1998
Flight number:
RZ1644
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
10
Captain / Total flying hours:
2354
Copilot / Total flying hours:
350
Aircraft flight hours:
792
Circumstances:
The single engine airplane departed San Juan Airport at 1138LT on a flight to Tamarindo with an intermediate stop in La Fortuna on behalf of SANSA - Servicios Aéreos Nacionales. At La Fortuna Airport, a Japanese tourist was drop off and the aircraft took off at 1205LT. About five minutes after takeoff, while cruising in IMC conditions at an altitude of 5,380 feet, the aircraft struck the slope of the Arenal Volcano. The wreckage was found about 200 metres below the summit and all 10 occupants were killed.
Crew:
Karl Acevedo Neverman, pilot,
William Badilla Salazar, copilot.
Passengers:
Terry Pratt,
Silvia Rhissiner,
Catherine Shoep,
Steven Bohmer,
Helena Gutierrez-Bohmer,
Frank Consolazio,
Yudi Consolazio,
Cristopher Damia.
Probable cause:
Controlled flight into terrain after the crew continued under VFR mode in IMC conditions. The following findings were identified:
- The pilot's unsafe flying and failure to maintain adequate separation (vertical and horizontal) with mountainous terrain and not remain in VMC. Moreover, lack of timely corrective action by the crew allowed the aircraft to fly in a controlled manner and unnoticed into the ground.
- Loss of situational awareness and attention from the crew.
- Inadequate monitoring and enforcement by the pilot not flying.
- Lack of application or adherence to standard operating procedures established by SANSA.
- Using flight procedures not written or approved.
- Lack of culture regarding operational safety.