Crash of a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan in Victoria: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 9, 2019 at 2010 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N4602B
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Victoria – Houston
MSN:
208B-0140
YOM:
1988
Flight number:
MRA679
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The single engine airplane, en route to Houston-George W. Bush Intl Airport, crashed in unknown circumstances shortly after takeoff from Victoria Airport, Texas. The wreckage was found in a wooded area and the pilot, sole on board, was killed.

Crash of a Cessna 208B Super Cargomaster in Victoria: 2 killed

Date & Time: Nov 23, 1998 at 0030 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N9352B
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Vancouver - Victoria
MSN:
208-0061
YOM:
1987
Flight number:
RXX434
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
1653
Captain / Total hours on type:
400.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
120
Aircraft flight hours:
6717
Circumstances:
Regency Express Air Operations Flight 434, a Cessna 208 Caravan (serial number 208B0061), was en route from Vancouver International Airport to Victoria International Airport, British Columbia, on a night visual flight rules (VFR) flight when it collided with trees on Saltspring Island, about five nautical miles (nm) north of the Victoria International Airport. The aircraft broke apart on impact and a post-crash fire occurred. The two pilots, who were the sole occupants of the aircraft, sustained fatal injuries, and the aircraft was destroyed. The accident occurred at 0030 Pacific standard time (PST).
Probable cause:
Findings as to Causes and Contributing Factors:
A. Although weather information was available by radio from the Vancouver FSS specialists or from the Victoria Terminal controllers, there is no indication that the pilots requested weather updates from either of these units.
B. The crew of RXX434 would have encountered the lower ceiling in the vicinity of Beaver Point. This lower layer of cloud would have restricted the crew's view of the ground lighting and reduced the ambient lighting available to navigate by visual means.
C. With the loss of ground references, it is unlikely that the crew would have been able to perceive the divergence of the aircraft's flight path away from its intended track by visual means.
D. The crew was unable to maintain separation between the aircraft and the terrain by visual means.
E. The published VFR arrival and departure routes for Victoria were not consistent with obstacle clearance requirements for commercial operators.
F. Regency Express Air Operations' crew manual suggested an en route altitude of 1,500 feet for this particular flight. That route and altitude combination is not consistent with published obstacle clearance requirements.
Other Findings:
1. At the time the crew completed their flight planning, the weather at the departure airport of Vancouver and the arrival airport of Victoria was suitable for a night VFR flight.
2. An amended terminal forecast for Victoria indicating the presence of a temporary ceiling at 2,000 feet asl was issued after the crew had completed their preflight planning activities.
3. The regulation requiring GPWS equipment does not apply to air taxi operations because the aircraft used in those operations do not meet weight or propulsion criteria.
Final Report:

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-6 Twin Otter 100 off Victoria

Date & Time: Dec 16, 1976
Operator:
Registration:
C-FAJB
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Vancouver - Victoria
MSN:
19
YOM:
1966
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
14
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Approaching Victoria on a flight from Coal Harbour in Vancouver, the crew encountered limited visibility due to foggy conditions. The seaplane landed hard, causing both floats to be damaged. All 16 occupants were evacuated safely while the aircraft sank in the Juan de Fuca Strait, by a depth of 300 feet, about 4 miles south of Victoria Harbour.

Crash of a Consolidated PBV-1A Canso near Victoria: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jul 16, 1967 at 1740 LT
Registration:
CF-FFX
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Victoria - Victoria
MSN:
CV-293
YOM:
1941
Flight number:
Tanker 772
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
10300
Captain / Total hours on type:
500.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
3600
Copilot / Total hours on type:
53
Circumstances:
The crew was called at 1630LT for a forest fire that erupted on Skirt mountain near Victoria. The crew first made a scooping mission on the Saanich Inlet with more than 1,000 gallons of water. About an hour later, while flying at low height, the left wing of Tanker 772 struck a tree and the airplane crashed. Both pilots were killed, Alex Davidson (founder of The Flying Fireman) and Robert 'Paddy' Moore. The mission was completed on behalf of the BC Forest Service.
Probable cause:
Misjudgement of altitude on part of the flying crew.
Final Report: